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REMM: Riparian Ecosystem Management Model USDA-Agricultural Research Service University of Georgia California State University – Chico USDA-Natural Resources.

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Presentation on theme: "REMM: Riparian Ecosystem Management Model USDA-Agricultural Research Service University of Georgia California State University – Chico USDA-Natural Resources."— Presentation transcript:

1 REMM: Riparian Ecosystem Management Model USDA-Agricultural Research Service University of Georgia California State University – Chico USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service

2 Outline n Model Components n Applications of REMM n Integration with watershed models/other ongoing work

3 REMM: Components n Adding pesticides hydrology sediment vegetative growth nutrient dynamics

4 Three Zone Buffer System

5 Riparian Ecosystem Management Model n Quantify water quality benefits of multiple zone buffers and account for: n Climate (either real or synthetic) n Slope (variable among zones) n Soils (hydrologic, nutrient, carbon) n Vegetation (above and below) n loadings from nonpoint source

6 REMM: Vegetation Types coniferous trees deciduous trees herbaceous perennials/ annuals annuals

7 REMM: Vegetation Upper canopy/lower canopy Multiple vegetation types in both canopies based on percent cover Any/all vegetation can be in each zone

8 Phosphorus Pools in Soil and Litter

9 Nitrogen Pools in Soil and Litter

10 Litter and Soil Interactions in REMM

11 REMM: Input Required n Upland inputs – daily surface runoff and subsurface flow, associated sediment and chemistry n Daily Weather Data n Site Description n Soil Characteristics n Erosion Factors n Vegetation Characteristics

12 REMM: Documentation n Coded in C++, primarily by R.G. Williams n Executable version available for download n Editing tools to build data sets available for download n Text of users guide available online n Graphical user interface developed by L. S. Altier at Cal State.

13 REMM: Documentation n Published as USDA Conservation Research Report No. 46 in We have copies!! n General article on REMM structure with some sensitivity analysis in JSWC n REMM tested (validation) in two articles in Trans. ASAE n Applications of REMM for coastal plain systems published in JAWRA and Trans. ASAE

14 Uses for REMM n Predict load reductions for buffer scenarios n Predict outputs to streams for different nonpoint source loadings n Predict changes in pollutant transport processes

15 Uses for REMM n Compare buffers with different vegetation n Predict changes in pollutant removal mechanisms n Examine behavior of riparian systems as represented by REMM

16 Example - Buffer Scenarios n 14 buffers ranging from minimum Zone 1 buffer (5 m) to 52 m three zone buffer n Simulated both conventional row crop loading (normal) and dairy lagoon effluent loading (high).

17 Loading Scenarios

18 Buffer Scenarios

19 Total Water Output

20 Total N Output

21 Total N load reduction

22 Sediment Output

23 Sediment Load Reduction

24 Use of REMM to Simulate Mature Buffer on Highly P Loaded Soils (All values kg P/ha) ResidueHumusLabile Inorganic Active Inorganic Stable Inorganic Litter +Soil (Base) Litter+ Soil (High)

25 Long Term Phosphorus Losses from Buffer with Highly Enriched Soil P

26 After about 500 years – near background levels

27 Use of REMM to simulate mature buffer receiving increased loadings of P n Increase the P pools in buffer from measured (base case) to 10x base case n Increase the dissolved P input in surface runoff from measured (base case) to 10x base case

28 Use of REMM to simulate mature buffer receiving increased loadings of P Litter + Soil (kg P/ha) (1x to 10x) Dissolved P Surface Runoff inputs (kg P/ha/yr) (1x to 10x) 1,868 to 18,6806 to 60

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31 Model nonpoint source pollution control by a wide range of buffers

32 Future Work with REMM n Integration with ARS watershed models – SWAT and AnnAGNPS n Testing with data from ARS buffer research sites – currently working on Beltsville site, Ames, Corvallis, Coshocton, Florence, Oxford, Tifton, University Park. n Addition of new components for pesticides to be compatible with WS models n Consultation with diverse groups of users

33 Integration with SWAT n Conceptually fits between upland sources areas and channel processes. n Preliminary work plan developed between modeling teams

34 Integration with SWAT n Require surface and subsurface outputs from source areas n Change from 3 zone to variable zone with default of one zone. Alternatively, change to one zone.

35 Integration with SWAT n Change as many variables as possible in vegetation to default values. Remain as input variables but automatically use default values.

36 Integration with SWAT n Change from 3 layer to multiple layer, default = 3. n Keep all the soil and litter pools. n Initialize all soil carbon pools directly from a soil organic matter value.

37 Integration with SWAT n Initialize soil organic N and soil organic P pools directly from SOC pools based on C/N and C/P ratios. n Standardize temperature and water factors

38 Integration with SWAT - General n Functions of riparian zones will vary with stream order n Some will receive inputs from source areas n Some will receive inputs from upstream watersheds

39 Integration with SWAT -Channels n Can provide some dynamic inputs such as root biomass and coarse woody debris inputs needed to model streams and streambanks

40 Integration with SWAT - VFS n Separate use for VFS from use for riparian buffer? VFS could be based on field border area rather than channel length. Riparian buffer would be based on channel length and/or hydrologic contributing area. How is water delivered to the VFS or to the riparian buffer? Does VFS put its water into the buffer? Is this the same as a multiple zone buffer?


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