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Welcome to Basic Orienteering Orienteering is finding your way, at speed, from control point to control point. Across any terrain! To find out how to navigate.

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Presentation on theme: "Welcome to Basic Orienteering Orienteering is finding your way, at speed, from control point to control point. Across any terrain! To find out how to navigate."— Presentation transcript:

1 Welcome to Basic Orienteering Orienteering is finding your way, at speed, from control point to control point. Across any terrain! To find out how to navigate this CD click below, otherwise click NEXT to continue. Click for CD instructions > NEXT

2 Basic Orienteering Skills Within this CD you’ll find an introduction to: The compass and map How to pace to judge distance Techniques to help you Important safety advice Ready for classroom and practical lessons. NEXT

3 The Overall Aim “ By using a range of techniques you will be safe, successful and competitive ”

4 Objectives To understand: Pacing Compass The map The techniques Safety

5 Menu Please select from the following: Study entire CD Jump to pacing Jump to compass work Jump to the map Jump to Techniques Jump to self assessment

6 How to use this CD ?? ( Page 1 of 2 ) To navigate this CD: Return to the menu Back a page Restart current section Next page

7 How to use this CD ?? ( Page 2 of 2 ) To make a choice within this CD: Use this button to make a selection or submit an answer Now lets start. Click the ‘Next page’ button….

8 Safety First !! (Page 1 of 6) Whether training or competing Orienteering is an individual sport therefore ---- Safety comes first ----

9 Safety First !! (Page 2 of 6) The Whistle All orienteers should carry a whistle At all times….! Four blasts is the signal that you are in trouble.

10 Safety First !! (Page 3 of 6) Inform someone If you go training alone let a friend or family know where you are and when you’ll return. The day you’re injured will be the day you didn’t !

11 Safety First !! (Page 4 of 6) Train in pairs Where possible orienteer with a friend and take it in turns to navigate. You could learn more and it is a safer, social event.

12 Safety First !! (Page 5 of 6) Take a mobile phone In this modern age you could take a mobile phone and call for assistance if necessary. The other safety precautions should still be followed.

13 Safety First !! (Page 6 of 6) 1.Take a whistle 2.Inform someone where you’ll be 3.Train with a partner 4.Take a mobile phone Remember ---- Safety comes first ----

14 Pacing (Page 1 of 5) During orienteering you will travel, whether running or walking, over distances from 100 metres (m) up to 1 kilometer (km) which is 1000 m. How can you easily judge distance covered ? PACING

15 All orienteering maps have a scale. See if you can identify the scale on this map? Use the answer buttons. Pacing (Page 2 of 5)

16 Well Done ! This is the ‘scale’ for this map. You can use this and the scale marks on the baseplate of your compass to judge distance from point to point. Pacing (Page 3 of 5)

17 Pacing (Page 4 of 5) When you first reach an orienteering course to practice you need to measure a distance of 100m using the map scale and see how many left foot paces it takes to: >Run? >Walk? Now when you go from point to point on the map you can judge how far you have gone therefore know where you are.

18 Pacing (Page 5 of 5) Here it is about 50m from point 1 to 2. If you paced 70 steps per 100m then count 35 left foot paces in the right direction and you should be within sight of your flag. 1 2

19 The Compass (Page 1 of 5) During orienteering we rely on the compass to travel in the right direction from point to point. On the next slide you will see what makes up a compass.

20 The baseplate has the direction arrow and a scale to judge distance. The round rotating ‘bezel’ is used to set our direction of travel from map to real world. The needle’s red end always points North. Now we can navigate. Move to next page. The Compass (Page 2 of 5)

21 The Compass (Page 3 of 5) We line the edge of the compass up with the line on our orienteering course. We want the black arrow on the baseplate to show us where to go START FINISH MAP

22 The Compass (Page 4 of 5) START FINISH Now we rotate the bezel so its Northing lines line up with those on the map. Remember red is North.

23 The Compass (Page 5 of 5) Now, with the compass off the map, if we physically hold the compass so the bezel Northings line up with the North needle point, the black baseplate arrow will show us the way.

24 The Map (Page 1 of 7) Here is an example of part of a simple orienteering map. The maps cover short distances and are full of useful detail.

25 The map has : Colours Contours Features and a Legend The Map (Page 2 of 7)

26 On each map we have a ‘key’ to the shaded areas. e.g. This colour represents open land. The Map - Colours (Page 3 of 7)

27 Each brown line represents ground at the same height. Between each brown line is 5 metres of climb or descent. Close lines mean the ground slopes more steeply. We can use this fact when we look for proof that we know where we are… The Map - Contours (Page 4 of 7)

28 Which set of contour lines might represent a hill or small valley instead of just sloping ground? The Map - Contours (Page 5 of 7)

29 Well done! This could be a hill with slope on all sides. The challenge is learning to interpret the map against the ground around you. The Map - Contours (Page 6 of 7)

30 The Map - Features (Page 7 of 7) The legend shows us the different features that can help us find our way. Examples: Areas of water Buildings

31 The 5 Basic Techniques (Page 1 of 6) During orienteering we use one or more methods to control our enthusiastic race between control points. The following techniques should be adopted, as appropriate, alongside pacing and compass work to ensure success.

32 By picking features ie boulders, path junctions etc we set up “baby steps” on our way. In this example we don’t go straight from 1 to 2. The red line shows how we navigate to the clearing (a), boulders (b), the ridge (c) and on to the stream to find the control point. These are our chosen attack points. They give us confidence in our position. 1 2 c b a Techniques – Attack points (Page 2 of 6)

33 Handrails are linear (straight) map features that we can “hold on to” at speed to reach our next control or ‘attack point’. Techniques - Handrails (Page 3 of 6) Examples: Paths Streams Fences

34 START 1 Techniques – Traffic lights (Page 4 of 6) AMBER – At your last ‘attack point’ before the control point, here you meet a path, slow to a walk/jog and look all around for the flag. RED – If you think you have passed where the flag should be, you’re at a slope you didn’t expect, stop, look around and if necessary go to the last known location. GREEN – Go fast when you are happy with your exact location and know where you’re going. X

35 When crossing an area of land to meet e.g. a path junction that we want as an ‘attack point’ we “aim off” to one side. If we know we have gone to the right of the junction (see example) we can confidently navigate on to it. If we aim straight for it and miss we won’t know which way to go. Techniques – Aiming off (Page 5 of 6)

36 Finally we use distinct features to “catch” us. In the example, beyond control 1 is a path. If we came across the path it would be a RED light that we need to go back to a known location. We have been caught and saved from getting lost. Techniques – Catching features (Page 6 of 6) X

37 Self Assessment Test The following test is for you to identify weaker areas for yourself to review before teacher led instruction: Select your answer with > If correct you will move on to the next question. If incorrect you will have the choice to retry the question or see the answer.

38 Question 1/10 Pacing – When running uphill we count more steps for the same distance because … ? Our stride lengthens so we travel further. The undergrowth slows us down. Our stride shortens so we travel less distance.

39 Question 2/10 Compass – The red part of our compass needle points … ? Along the Northings on the map. In the direction of travel. Towards magnetic North.

40 Question 3/10 Map – Which of these map features, over time, tends to stay the same? The contours. The linear (straight line) features. The vegetation boundaries (edges).

41 Question 4/10 Technique – Following paths or fence lines is which technique ? Using attack points. Using handrails. Aiming off.

42 Question 5/10 Safety – Why carry a whistle, at all times ? To give 4 blasts in an emergency. To distract the other runners. To indicate you’ve started.

43 Question 6/10 Compass – Where would you find the scale for measuring distances ? On the edge of the compass baseplate. Around the bezel. The edge of the needle itself.

44 Question 7/10 Map – How do you know what the coloured areas represent ? Use the legend. Look around you when running. The colours match their real life equivalent.

45 Question 8/10 Technique – Using “traffic lights” how fast are you travelling on AMBER ? Full speed there’s a way to go. You are going back to a known point. Walking/jogging and look all around.

46 Question 9/10 Pacing – It might take you 60 left foot paces to cover 100 metres. How many for 300 ?

47 Question 10/10 Safety – Why carry a mobile phone when orienteering ? For getting help in an emergency. There is no need to carry one. No public phones are provided on courses.

48 Sorry that’s incorrect. Please click the back button to retry or the next page button to reveal the answer…..

49 Thank you for studying Orienteering

50 Objectives To orienteer successfully you know you need to: Pace yourself Use the compass Study the map Employ the techniques Always think safety AND HAVE FUN ………

51 And remember, if lost …. Don’t panic Look around Distinctive features – linear or hills or buildings Backtrack if necessary Have you stopped short ? What have you passed en route Nearest handrail ? To regroup Still lost ? Whistle, friend or phone !!

52 Menu Please select from the following: Study entire CD Jump to pacing Jump to compass work Jump to the map Jump to Techniques Jump to self assessment

53 Pacing - Sorry that’s incorrect. Please click the back button to retry or the next page button to reveal the answer…..

54 Contours - Sorry that’s incorrect. Please click the back button to retry or the next page button to reveal the answer…..

55 Question 1 - Sorry that’s incorrect. Please click the back button to retry or the next page button to reveal the answer…..

56 Answer 1 Well done! Pacing – Be aware that we step shorter running uphill and through thick vegetation. You will travel a shorter distance.

57 Question 2 - Sorry that’s incorrect. Please click the back button to retry or the next page button to reveal the answer…..

58 Answer 2 Well done! The red end of the needle always points to magnetic North. Now you can orientate the North lines on your map with the red point and orienteer successfully.

59 Question 3 - Sorry that’s incorrect. Please click the back button to retry or the next page button to reveal the answer…..

60 Answer 3 Well done! Map – Over time the “lie of the land” will stay the same. Vegetation grows and changes. Man made features are built and removed. Awareness of the lands shape is an invaluable skill.

61 Question 4 - Sorry that’s incorrect. Please click the back button to retry or the next page button to reveal the answer…..

62 Answer 4 Well done! Technique – Straight line features are “handrails”. Follow fences, paths etc but remember to use the compass, pacing and the other techniques. Linear features can change !

63 Question 5 - Sorry that’s incorrect. Please click the back button to retry or the next page button to reveal the answer…..

64 Answer 5 Well done! Safety – A whistle is an essential piece of equipment. If you have an accident or get very lost the whistle blast is more obvious and travels further than shouting. Remember 4 blasts in an emergency.

65 Question 6 - Sorry that’s incorrect. Please click the back button to retry or the next page button to reveal the answer…..

66 Answer 6 Well done! Compass – The scale is found along the edge of ‘most’ compass baseplates. Measure and pace to be confident of your location.

67 Question 7 - Sorry that’s incorrect. Please click the back button to retry or the next page button to reveal the answer…..

68 Answer 7 Well done! Map – The map legend has the landscape colour codes and a key to all features. Use boundaries and features as attack points or traffic lights.

69 Question 8 - Sorry that’s incorrect. Please click the back button to retry or the next page button to reveal the answer…..

70 Answer 8 Well done! Technique – Remember AMBER means caution. You are nearly at your control and should be looking all around for that elusive flag.

71 Question 9 - Sorry that’s incorrect. Please click the back button to retry or the next page button to reveal the answer…..

72 Answer 9 Well done! Pacing – If it takes 60 left foot paces to cover 100m then it will be: 3 x 60 = 180 paces for 300m.

73 Question 10 - Sorry that’s incorrect. Please click the back button to retry or the next page button to reveal the answer…..

74 Answer 10 Well done! Safety – When training on your own a mobile phone is another means of summoning aid in an emergency. As well as a whistle and informing someone where you will be running.


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