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How to Judge a History Fair Website This tutorial will orient you to the website category, its rules, and then steps to judging websites. January 2015.

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Presentation on theme: "How to Judge a History Fair Website This tutorial will orient you to the website category, its rules, and then steps to judging websites. January 2015."— Presentation transcript:

1 How to Judge a History Fair Website This tutorial will orient you to the website category, its rules, and then steps to judging websites. January 2015

2 Website Judging Time Budget Review rules & guidelines orientation, 10 minutes Prep materials, contact partner judge, 10 minutes Website judging, 20 minutes each, taking notes/preliminary scores = 2 hours Discussion with partner judge = 30 minutes Write final evaluations and send = minutes This is the same amount of time that judges spend assessing projects at History Fair events!

3 What is a History Fair Website?

4 A History Fair website is a computer-based representation of a student’s research and argument that is interconnected by hyperlinks.

5 A History Fair website is NOT an online Powerpoint slideshow ( e.g., one or two images + a block of text per page) paper composed of mostly words, few images exhibit without interactivity, audio or visual sources wiki or website full of unanalyzed resources

6 History Fair websites are interpretive histories that are interactive and involve the viewer. Websites may include evidence comprising: Multiple Images Maps Pop-up windows Sound Videos Hyperlinked timelines Dynamic charts Choices of how to explore

7 History Fair Projects are judged on: Historical Knowledge – Solid background and context – Relevant information: who/what/when/where Analysis – Do they have a thesis, backed up by claims and evidence? – Do they address how and why? – Do they demonstrate change over time? – Do they address the significance of the change? Sources – What is the quality, variety, and depth of their primary and secondary sources? Presentation – How well do they use the medium of a website? – Is it structured cogently? – Is careful attention paid to details? Adherence to the specific project rules and guidelines

8 Review the History Fair Scoring Rationale for the four criteria before evaluating and scoring your assigned History Fair websites.

9 Website Rule 1 Topics must connect with Chicago or Illinois history in order to be considered “competitive.” The 2015 theme is “Leadership and Legacy in History.”

10 Website Rule 2 Students are required to post the word count for their own words on the front page of their website and on the Summary Statement. 1,200 words is equal to five page paper. If their reported word count looks “off,” ask History Fair staff to double-check. Website entries may not have more than 1,200 student-composed words. Quotations, source credits, the tabs, annotated bibliography, and Summary Statement do NOT count.

11 Website Rule 3 Students must provide a Summary Statement and Annotated Bibliography in their website.

12 Website Rule 4 Multimedia clips (audio, visual) must not exceed a total of four minutes, combined. Music is included in the four-minute total. Audio may include music or voice recordings, but not student narration. Visual evidence may include primary source interviews (witnesses, participants) or secondary source interviews (experts). It also may include historical footage or clips from documentaries.

13 Website Rules – The “Tech Stuff” 5. No links to other websites. The only external links allowed in a History Fair website are those that allow the viewer to obtain a plug-in to view multimedia (e.g. Flash, QuickTime, etc.) No Google Drive. 6. All pages must be interconnected with hypertext links. Automatic redirects are not permitted. 7. The content and appearance of a page cannot change when the page is refreshed in the browser. Random text or image generators are not allowed. (That means, when you return to a page, it should look the same as when you last viewed it.) Students may use material gathered from other sites (for example, an interview clip provided by YouTube), but the material must be saved within the student’s site, not through link that takes you outside the website. No Google Drive links.

14 Website Rule 8 The first page of the website serves the “home page.” The homepage should include: Student name(s) Entry Title Division (Senior=high school, Junior=elementary school) Word Count of students’ own words Main Menu (the navigational tabs) A tab called “References” or “Student Materials” for the Summary Statement and Annotated Bibliography

15 The home page may include thesis and/or brief introduction. Students’ Names and Division and word count Main Menu (organization tabs)—may be on top or on the side “Student Materials” or “References” tab contains the Summary Statement and Annotated Bibliography Title Front Page

16 PENALTY POINTS (High School only) High School websites that violate the rules will be subject to penalty point deductions. Note these infractions as you are making your review notes. Exceeds student-composed word limit: Exceeds multimedia time limit: Links to sites outside the website: No Summary Statement : Bibliography not annotated: No bibliography : Minus 2 points for each 100 words beyond 1,200 (10 point maximum penalty) Minus 1 point for each 30 seconds over the four minute total (10 point maximum penalty) Minus 5 points per site (Exceptions: Plug-ins -- Flash, QuickTime, etc.) Minus 10 points Minus 5 points 0 points in the Sources category (Juniors receive lowest possible score in sources) Junior Division websites will not receive separate penalties—take under consideration when scoring each category. However if no Bibliography, give lowest score.

17 First Steps for Judging 1.Contact your partner judge via or phone provided. Set-up a date to talk on the phone or “skype.” Figure a date when you’ll be able to immediately write up your final evaluations while it is still fresh in your minds. PLEASE meet at least a day before the evals are due back at the History Fair, not the same day. 2. Open each website briefly, just to make sure it opens in your browser. If not, try another. If you still have problems, contact HF staff immediately at or 3. Review the Scoring Rationale sheet if you’ve not done so.

18 4. Prep your judging worksheets. Print a copy of the Judging Worksheet (one per project): Be sure to print the appropriate SENIOR or JUNIOR division sheets please! You will use this worksheet to take detailed notes as you review the projects. Students DO NOT receive a copy of your judging worksheet, so feel free to be candid in your worksheet remarks. Your notes should be detailed enough to guide your conversation with your judging partner and help you write your final evaluation afterwards. Record scores in each of the four areas of the History Fair criteria. Rate the project’s integration of the National History Day theme.

19 Judge the Website 5. First, go to the “Reference” or Student Materials tab to review the Summary Statement and Annotated Bibliography. Summary Statement lets you know what the student is intends to do in the website Annotated Bibliography gives you a glance at the sources he/she claims they used…you can keep that in mind when viewing the website. Note in your Sources category. 6. Return to first page to review its navigational tabs. It gives you a sense of the organization and logic of the site 7. NOW read the entire website content, noting its strengths and areas for improvement. Enjoy yourself!

20 Ask, “Does the website: Display content-rich web pages using a variety of sources that demonstrate a depth of knowledge and act as evidence for the students’ thesis and claims Use interactivity that contribute to (not distract from) the historical message Present a strong and clear organization through its navigational tabs For example: A short interview clip may help to personalize the story or convey a sense of historical significance, but some interactive elements (games, etc.)might distract from the project’s primary historical argument. An interactive timeline that links to primary sources can deepen the content and help display cause and effects. A clips of historical footage are better than using clips of an already-made documentary. Music that is primary source evidence is better than music used because it “sounds” related in some general way.

21 STEP 8: Confer with your partner. Discuss your reactions to the project with your partner, making sure that your scores and comments reflect similar responses to the student’s work. Not the same—just within similar range. Your partner judge may have noticed something in the project that you did not: take advantage of the opportunity to share your impressions with one another to ensure that the student will receive a thorough, fair, and consistent evaluation. Your total scores are within 8 points of each other. Scores should be above 70 points, barring any penalties. We ask that you NOT give “fair” ratings, as these projects are the best their schools had to offer. Make sure your penalty points match (if any rule infractions are found).

22 STEP 9: Write your final evaluations on the electronic judging forms provided. After your conversation, plan to immediately write up your final scorecards while the thoughts are still fresh. Both judges write a final evaluation of each project— the student will receive both reviews. Students receive your evaluations, so it is very important that you take care how you phrase your feedback. Use the “sandwich approach.” No matter their scores, students have worked hard on their websites and it is vital that you recognize their work and achievements.

23 Start with a positive comment that relates to their project. Focus on the strengths—every project has something positive. Then turn to areas for improvement and constructive suggestions. Avoid negative language – critiques should be framed in a way that sends an encouraging message to students (e.g. “You might consider…” is a more positive message than “Project lacks…”). Conclude with a positive comment that acknowledges and shows appreciation for their achievement.

24 Samples of Final Evaluations Because “Excellent”-Scoring Websites are the hardest to comment about, here’s two examples: Congratulations! You created a well organized website with a great deal of knowledge. I noticed your thesis on your summary form was more detailed than the on the webpage. It might have been more effective to use that one. I appreciated that your website was divided into separate “organizational buckets” of political, economic, social and environmental It made it easy to follow. You may consider a page on the context too of the national situation since it is so important to your topic. You have an ambitious topic which made a lot to analyze. Perhaps you may have found a narrow topic within? Was there one change in particular that you could have focused on? Some key books may have taken you to more sources by looking at and following the footnotes. Your presentation was solid and would be strengthened with the use of small video clips or music sources that make full use of the medium. Keep up the good work! It’s good to see students taking on a topic that is still very controversial today. Your image captions are very content rich. It was also good to see the use of a political cartoon. However, in the slide show under Women’s Rights, I was surprised to see multiple photos of trains from different periods. Perhaps one would have made the same point? On the other hand, the slideshow about women being lured into prostitution was much more effective. Your analysis of these images, coupled by primary source quotes could make this sequence even more effective! I was surprised that someone didn’t find a song or saloon music from the time. What was Chicago like during this time, and what were the options for single women? How did the Levee District end? Who was against it and what were their views on women’s roles in society? Again, overall a really good job. Some editing and less superfluous images would help tighten up the site.

25 STEP 10: Save each project evaluation individually using the following file name format: Project Entry#-your last name.doc Sample: w115-garcia.doc …and submit your completed final evaluations by the deadline to the History Fair: We cannot announce any results to students and teachers until we receive EVERY judges’ scorecards so it is vital that you observe the deadlines given.

26 A Recap of Rules & Penalties 1.A connection to Chicago/Illinois history required. If not present or very slight, note in remarks & filename. 2.1,200 student-composed rules. 3.The Summary Statement and Annotated Bibliography must be posted in its own tab. 4. Audio or visual sources combined=four minutes total. 5. No links outside the student website. 6. Pages should connect through hyperlinks. 7. No auto-returns or auto-changing pages. 8. Website has a main page that states the Title, Word Count, Student Names, and Division. No school name should be posted.

27 PENALTY POINTS (High School only) High School websites that violate the rules will be subject to penalty point deductions. If a specific penalty point amount is not given, you may decide to reflect in the Presentation category. Exceeds student-composed word limit: Exceeds multimedia time limit: Links to sites outside the website: No Summary Statement : Bibliography not annotated: No bibliography : Minus 2 points for each 100 words beyond 1,200 (10 point maximum penalty) Minus 1 point for each 30 seconds over the four minute total (10 point maximum penalty) Minus 5 points per site (Exceptions: Plug-ins -- Flash, QuickTime, etc.) Minus 10 points Minus 5 points 0 points in the Sources category (Juniors receive lowest possible score in sources) Junior Division websites will not receive separate penalties—take under consideration when scoring each category. However if NO Bibliography, give lowest score.

28 Thank You for Judging Students’ History Fair Websites


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