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Extended Services – ‘Myth Buster’  ES distract a school from its core business of teaching and learning  There is no funding – who’s going to pay for.

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Presentation on theme: "Extended Services – ‘Myth Buster’  ES distract a school from its core business of teaching and learning  There is no funding – who’s going to pay for."— Presentation transcript:

1 Extended Services – ‘Myth Buster’  ES distract a school from its core business of teaching and learning  There is no funding – who’s going to pay for this?  Schools always have to offer all the services themselves  The main focus of ES is childcare and after-school clubs

2 ES distract a school from its core business of teaching and learning Removing barriers to learning Providing opportunities that will enhance young people’s outcomes ECM is core business for a school and extended services are ECM in action Pupils only spend 14% of their time in school [Joseph Rowntree Foundation] There is growing independent evidence of the impact that these services have on children’s achievement January 08 Ofsted report: “Schools with the most effective services had integrated the development of extended provision within their school improvement plans with a clear focus on improving positive outcomes for children and young people”

3 There is no funding – who is going to pay for this? There has been a substantial investment in the development of ES in Surrey through confederations. This is set to continue with funding committed up to School can also spend from budgets such as school standards grants Additional funding can be made available from other sources Schools can use this funding flexibly to cover their particular needs, eg. new staff, new roles Schools can charge for some services in order to ensure their sustainability Schools can get help to explore funding through their Confederation Manager and Four S Much of extended services are not about providing new services but ensuring existing services can be better accessed and utilised

4 Schools always have to offer all the services themselves There is not a one-size-fits-all solution for each school. Services should be provided to meet local demand/need and to fit in with local and schools’ improvement planning priorities Where community consultation has shown that there is no demand for a particular service (or it already exists), schools do not need to offer this Schools do not have to offer the services themselves or on the school site

5 The main focus is childcare and after-school clubs Childcare and a varied menu of activities are just two of the five elements of the core offer: Parenting support: equipping parents with the skills to support and encourage their child’s education and helping them with issues that affect the well-being of the family Swift and easy access: ensuring that pupil’s barriers to learning are overcome through health and preventative work, effective support for those with additional needs and fast access to specialist services where necessary Community access: benefiting children, young people, parents/carers and other members of the community by offering the school’s facilities as a base for positive activities Childcare: giving children a good start in those crucial early years, supporting working parents to the benefit of the whole family Varied menu of activities: giving children and young people a choice of opportunities to enjoy and excel at outside of the classroom, adding to the school offer, which can transform their attitudes to school


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