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EtextBook – Elearning for Children Presented by, Neelima Krishnan.

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Presentation on theme: "EtextBook – Elearning for Children Presented by, Neelima Krishnan."— Presentation transcript:

1 EtextBook – Elearning for Children Presented by, Neelima Krishnan

2 Overview of presentation 1. Introduction to E Textbooks 2. Children and whats available. 3. Discuss 4 papers on Etextbooks for children 4. Advantages and Disadvantages of Ebooks. 5. Going through surveys by Scholastic, Apple etc.

3 What’s an ebook  "An electronic version of a printed book”- with more multimedia attached!History  The first e-book:- The Index Thomisticus- 1946, by Roberto Busa.  Andries van Dam from Brown University. coined the term "electronic book", in  Project Gutenberg- first digital library 1970 Early eReaders: 1. Rocket eBook -NuvoMedia [1998] 2. Gemstar International and Softbook Press Inc- reintroduced it as RCA eBook Reader [2000]

4 Children and Ebooks. In 2001, Acrobat and Amazon joined hands. Examples:

5 The Young eReader The Tech lab's Vinci Tablet for children from 0-5 years, by Dr. Dan Yang. For Kindergarden kids: For School children: redden-chab

6 Paper 1: Reading electronic books as a support for vocabulary, story comprehension and word reading in kindergarten and first grade – Ofra Korat Paper 2: Electronic books versus adult readers: Effects on children’s emergent literacy as a function of social class. O. Korat & A. Shamir Paper 3: The Electronic Library Emerald Article: Can electronic textbooks help children to learn? By Sally Maynard, Emily Cheyne Paper 4: Using Electronic Books in the Classroom to Enhance Emergent Literacy Skills in Young Children

7 Paper 1 1. What they did? 2. Do educational e-book support young children’s vocabulary, story comprehension and early word reading? 3. Does this support differ for kindergarten children compared to first graders. 4. E-books as a support for oral language 5. E-books as a support for word reading 6. Focus of this study

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9 Result of survey 1. First graders were better in reading the frequent words from the e-book than the kindergarten children before beginning their work with the e-book. 2. Both age groups exhibited good progress in their word meaning knowledge from the e-book, while the kindergarten children exhibited more significant progress in word reading than the first graders. 3. Both age groups showed a good story understanding level in the less demanding task of story comprehension (answering true/false questions), whereas first graders presented significantly higher results in the more demanding task of story production. 4. Story understanding has several levels, and that children in different age groups function differently according to their age level.

10 Paper 1: Reading electronic books as a support for vocabulary, story comprehension and word reading in kindergarten and first grade – Ofra Korat Paper 2: Electronic books versus adult readers: Effects on children’s emergent literacy as a function of social class. O. Korat & A. Shamir Paper 3: The Electronic Library Emerald Article: Can electronic textbooks help children to learn? By Sally Maynard, Emily Cheyne Paper 4: Using Electronic Books in the Classroom to Enhance Emergent Literacy Skills in Young Children

11 Paper 2 1. What they did? 2. Questions Posed: a) What type of activity, children reading the e-book independently or being read to by an adult, will better improve the child’s overall emergent literacy? b) Will there be any difference in the degree of improvement in the children’s levels of emergent literacy as a function of their SES group?

12 Children’s emergent literacy level 1. Vocabulary 2. Word recognition 3. Phonological awareness 4. Story comprehensionProcedure 1. The pre-intervention stage 2. The activity with the e-book 3. Adult reading to the child 4. The post-intervention stag e

13 Results

14 Results: Summation 1. new technologies have the potential to support cognitive development and learning. 2. Ebooks could constitute a good source for supporting young children’s language development, story comprehension and other emergent literacy skills. 3. Effectiveness depends on how well have they been designed to specifically meet the children’s developmental needs. 4. We need software that incorporates the special advantages of electronic and the interactive media and, also support children’s comprehension of the story and their exploration of the written text.

15 Paper 1: Reading electronic books as a support for vocabulary, story comprehension and word reading in kindergarten and first grade – Ofra Korat Paper 2: Electronic books versus adult readers: Effects on children’s emergent literacy as a function of social class. O. Korat & A. Shamir Paper 3: The Electronic Library Emerald Article: Can electronic textbooks help children to learn? By Sally Maynard, Emily Cheyne Paper 4: Using Electronic Books in the Classroom to Enhance Emergent Literacy Skills in Young Children

16 Paper 3 : Can Etextbooks help children learn – Age Group years. 1. What they did? 2. Design/methodology/approach 3. Findings 4. Research limitations/implications 5. Advantages 6. Disadvantages

17 Results

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19 Conclusion 1. Using e-textbooks for educational purposes can affect the learning and understanding of pupils. 2. In the group tests, those who used the e-textbook scored significantly higher marks than those who used the printed equivalent. 3. Children are keen and willing to use textbooks on a computer, and as a result increase their learning capacity. 4. The consequence of introducing e-textbooks into schools would mean a wider range of learning tools. 5. Cost Effectiveness? 6. E-textbook can change and influence creativity and motivate learning. 7.Introduction of e-textbooks into schools would complement the printed textbook, not replace it.

20 Paper 1: Reading electronic books as a support for vocabulary, story comprehension and word reading in kindergarten and first grade – Ofra Korat Paper 2: Electronic books versus adult readers: Effects on children’s emergent literacy as a function of social class. O. Korat & A. Shamir Paper 3: The Electronic Library Emerald Article: Can electronic textbooks help children to learn? By Sally Maynard, Emily Cheyne Paper 4: Using Electronic Books in the Classroom to Enhance Emergent Literacy Skills in Young Children

21 Paper 4 1. Main goal a) assesses the current research on e-storybooks for supporting young children b) offers suggestions about how this evidence can be translated into best practice in classroom 2. Findings The Quality of eBook is important.

22 Emergent Literacy Development No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (a) oral language (b) phonological awareness (c) print awareness (d) alphabet knowledge. Shared Storybook Reading the following instructional interventions can promote emergent literacy development: (a) exposure to print through reading and writing, (b) opportunities to learn and use language (c) letter instruction, (d) phonological awareness instruction.

23 Potential Benefits of E-storybooks in the Classroom Reading Engagement 1. Allow young children and struggling readers to enjoy books independently due to electronic features. 2. E-storybooks are widely used with students who are beginning to learn to read or diagnosed with reading disabilities 3. provide supports to include the use of digital scaffolding supports 4. word pronunciation tools to assist students with phonological awareness and decoding of text.

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26 Using Etextbooks in Classrooms- What needs to be considered: 1.Developmental appropriateness of e-textbooks Developmentally appropriate practice (DAP) is defined by the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC, 1997) has the guidelines. 3 dimensions to be considered: a. age b. individuality c. cultural and social contexts. 2. Considerations about matching digital features within books to emergent literacy goals. 3. Information regarding the overall quality of research behind e- storybook use for young children.

27 4. Design Considerations: (1) multimedia design for presentation of words and Pictures (2) interface design for format and control (3) learning design for purpose, content, and feedback. Distracting E-storybook Features 1. Hotspots can be overwelming for children, especially those unrelated to the story. 2. The animations in ebook can distract children from actually reading the text.

28 Advantages of Etextbooks 1. Searching for information is NOT like trolling for fish. 2. Information is available cheaper- The case of Philippine - American war & Christopher Columbus. 3. Libraries and Student Performance 4. No more cutting trees 5. Reduced loads in kids backpacks 6. Ability of the textbook to be more current

29 Cost Effectiveness: Report by the US book Industry Study Group An average book it releases more than 4kg of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere - that's the same as flying 20 miles. cost of transportation during distribution and warehousing the waste and toxic chemicals from the paper mills.Ebooks: Increase in amount of digital data. Many interesting books are available for free. Device/ Handheld is expensive. Parents will be more cautious.

30 What needs to be provided: 1. Support for teachers 2. Support for students

31 Challenges one might face  Online Access  Lack of Basic Computing skill  Responsibility for Technical Instruction  Logistics of text distribution and collection  Adapting Instruction

32 Survey by RR Bowker’s PubTrack Market Basics:  The overall children’s book market was $3.08 billion in  E-books make up about 11 percent of sales for children’s books.  In Q3 2011,the average price of a children’s e-book was $4.57, compared to $10.22 for a hardcover and $8.29 for a trade paperback.

33 The E-Book Market for 0- to 12-Year-Olds More than 85 percent of children’s books are bought on impulse. Special challenges for e-books: 37 percent of the children’s books in their houses were bought new 34 percent hand-me-downs 17 percent given by others as gifts 9 percent borrowed from the library. “It’s still virtually impossible to buy a used e-book or “hand down” an e- book, and e-book library lending, while growing, is in early stages”.

34 Attitude of parents: 2/3 of book-buying parents want to see books identified by grade level or reading level. Parents want their children to read the printed editions. over 50% of the parents expressed concern that the other attractions of digital devices might eventually entice kids away from reading. Attitude of children (9-12 years olds) E-books are “fun and cool,” Cost less Entice them to read more.

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36 The E-Book Market for 13 to 17 Year-Olds Teens lag behind all other age groups in e-book adoption. 66% of 13- to 17-year olds say they prefer print books to e-books 26 percent say they have no preference Only 8 percent prefer e-books. Reason for this resistance 1. Social technology : Liking, sharing and tweeting. 2. “Too many restrictions on using e-books” 3. Small screen for the handhelds. 4. Hunger Games trilogy is an exception!

37 Disadvantages/Issues of Ebooks in schools: 1. No one-stop shopping. 2. Lack of standardization. 3. Incomplete feature list. 4. Terrible pricing models. 5. Access to technology. 6. Increasing screen time. 7. Eco-friendly? 8. Lack of Human Touch! 9. Lack of Imagination.

38 Concern “My daughter can’t stop texting long enough to concentrate on a book,” said one parent surveyed, the mother of a 15-year-old. A mother of a 7-year-old Michigan boy, said, “I am afraid my son’s attention span will only include fast-moving ideas, and book reading will become boring to him.”

39 Video for Etextbook at school Android tablets for ages 11 to 18years. Kurio Android Tablet for Children Lexibook Android Tablet for Kids

40 References: /ebook_summit_preview_should_kids.html.csp ebooks textbooks/ /1 427/are_ebooks_any_good.html.csp classroom/ Papers:

41 Questions?


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