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Facilitation Skills EduStudy Corporate Training 1 EDUSTUDY COPYRIGHT © EDUSTUDY EDUCATIONAL GROUP (PTY) LTD.

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Presentation on theme: "Facilitation Skills EduStudy Corporate Training 1 EDUSTUDY COPYRIGHT © EDUSTUDY EDUCATIONAL GROUP (PTY) LTD."— Presentation transcript:

1 Facilitation Skills EduStudy Corporate Training 1 EDUSTUDY COPYRIGHT © EDUSTUDY EDUCATIONAL GROUP (PTY) LTD

2 2 EDUSTUDY Centre for Community Assistance and Training (CENCAT) - Copyright © 2011 Module One: Getting Started Facilitation is often referred to as the new cornerstone of management philosophy. With its focus on fairness and creating an easy decision making, facilitation can make any organization make better decisions. This Course will give participants an understanding of what facilitation is all about, as well as some tools that they can use to facilitate small meetings. Facilitative skills are increasingly becoming a core competency for leaders, consultants, and others who work with groups. Roger Schwarz

3 3 EDUSTUDY Centre for Community Assistance and Training (CENCAT) - Copyright © 2011 Course Objectives Define facilitation and identify its purpose and benefits. Clarify the role and focus of a facilitator. Differentiate between process and content in the context of a group discussion. Provide tips in choosing and preparing for facilitation. Identify a facilitator’s role when managing groups in each of Tuckman and Jensen’s stages of group development: forming, storming, norming, and performing. Identify ways a facilitator can help a group reach a consensus: from encouraging participation to choosing a solution. Provide guidelines in dealing with disruptions, dysfunctions, and difficult people in groups.

4 4 EDUSTUDY Centre for Community Assistance and Training (CENCAT) - Copyright © 2011 Module Two: Understanding Facilitation Groups are powerful resources in any organization. When you tap into groups, you don’t just get the best of individual members, you also get the best of group interaction. The result is a more dynamic, creative and empowered team. Managers who fail to learn facilitation skills are getting buried. Their traditional “direct control” approach to managing just does not work when there is so much to do and so little time to do it Richard Weaver & John Farrell

5 5 EDUSTUDY Centre for Community Assistance and Training (CENCAT) - Copyright © 2011 What is Facilitation Facilitation is a manner of handling group meetings in a way that takes the focus away from just one leader, and instead distributes leadership to all members of the group. FACILITATION: “How do you think the company can solve this problem? Does anyone have any ideas?” PRESENTATION: “This is how we will solve the problem…”

6 6 EDUSTUDY Centre for Community Assistance and Training (CENCAT) - Copyright © 2011 What is a Facilitator? Group-centered meetings require an individual or individuals in the case of larger groups to manage the process. This person(s) is a facilitator. A facilitator is a person who helps groups to arrive at their objective by ensuring that everyone’s contribution is heard and the processes being used are both productive and empowering to all. Facilitation can also involve managing group member’s emotions, defusing tensions and encouraging team cohesiveness.

7 7 EDUSTUDY Centre for Community Assistance and Training (CENCAT) - Copyright © 2011 When is Facilitation Appropriate? When you want to encourage group motivation, commitment and confidence. When you want to make the most of group knowledge, experience and diversity. When there is more than one answer to a question, or one side to a story. When a person in power wants to just be a participant. When you want to learn about your group’s process, or challenge an inefficient process. When there are psychological blocks that need to be addressed in an issue.

8 8 EDUSTUDY Centre for Community Assistance and Training (CENCAT) - Copyright © 2011 Module Three: Process vs. Content Facilitators are process experts; they are as interested in the “how?” as much as the “what?” To produce quality output, you must arrive at it functionally. In this module, we will discuss the difference between process and content, and which among the two should be a facilitator’s focus. The new leader is a facilitator, not an order giver. John Naisbitt

9 9 EDUSTUDY Centre for Community Assistance and Training (CENCAT) - Copyright © 2011 About Process Process elements include: Meeting Flow Participation Communication Roles Power/ Influence Problem-Solving Process Decision-Making Process Group Atmosphere

10 10 EDUSTUDY Centre for Community Assistance and Training (CENCAT) - Copyright © 2011 About Content Content refers to the subject matter of a discussion: the actual words or ideas that were spoken independent of contextual variables like non-verbal cues and procedural variables. It refers mainly to the literal meaning of words and makes no reference to connotations, subtexts, and insinuations behind messages. Content in a facilitated discussion should all come from the group and not the facilitator.

11 11 EDUSTUDY Centre for Community Assistance and Training (CENCAT) - Copyright © 2011 A Facilitator’s Focus A facilitator should attend to both process and content. Facilitators are primarily process experts; they manage information flow and treatment. They’re also content neutral; they should never take sides in a debate. When a facilitator adds to the content of a discussion, the facilitator’s role is confused from neutral guide to biased participant or a trainer/ coach.

12 12 EDUSTUDY Centre for Community Assistance and Training (CENCAT) - Copyright © 2011 Module Four: Laying the Groundwork A facilitated approach is not just a technique; it’s an attitude and disposition to doing things that should be shared by the whole organization. To best benefit from group facilitation, you need to set the stage for it. In this module, we will discuss choosing a facilitated approach, planning for a facilitated meeting and collecting data. It’s amazing what you can accomplish when it doesn’t matter who gets the credit. Anonymous

13 13 EDUSTUDY Centre for Community Assistance and Training (CENCAT) - Copyright © 2011 Choosing a Facilitated Approach Orient the participants about what facilitation is, and what it can do for them. If a team is new to the facilitated approach, they might find difficulty with the process. Make sure that facilitation has the administration’s support. The incentive to make the most out of a facilitated discussion can be nullified if the people who make decisions still prefer a top-down, autocratic approach. Choose the right facilitator. Facilitators can be from within the organization or a freelance professional.

14 14 EDUSTUDY Centre for Community Assistance and Training (CENCAT) - Copyright © 2011 Planning for a Facilitated Meeting Set the venue. Facilitation works best if the venue is conducive to a comfortable discussion. Set aside time. Facilitated meetings should not be rushed; minding process is the reason why it works well. Prepare a Facilitation Plan. As a facilitator, never go blindly into a meeting. While an experienced facilitator would likely have enough skills enough to “wing it”, it always pay to be prepared. Make plans for documentation. To better be able to follow up, and identify process issues in a group, it always helps if a meeting is documented. Prepare Psychologically. Lastly, it’s important that you take the time to prepare internally if you’re going to facilitate a meeting.

15 15 EDUSTUDY Centre for Community Assistance and Training (CENCAT) - Copyright © 2011 Collecting Data Communicate ahead with the person who invited you to facilitate the meeting to understand what is expected from the meeting and what is expected from you as a facilitator. Ideally, you should also be able to interview or survey participants ahead of time. This can give you time to understand the dynamics of the situation, as well as establish rapport. Request documentation about the group’s previous meetings e.g. minutes or progress reports. They will give you an idea of where the group is at the moment. If there’s a sensitive issue involved, know as much as you can about the situation – and even the personalities involved. Understand the subject matter of the meeting. While facilitators are not content experts, you must know enough about the topic to be able to track the discussion.

16 16 EDUSTUDY Centre for Community Assistance and Training (CENCAT) - Copyright © 2011 Module Five: Tuckman and Jensen’s Model of Team Development In this module, we will discuss one of the most widely-used theories of group development: Tuckman and Jensen’s Model of Team Development. We will also discuss how a facilitator can best respond to groups depending on what stage of development they are in. Every company has two organizational structures: the formal one is written on the charts; the other is the everyday relationship of the men and women in the organization. Harold H. Geneen

17 17 EDUSTUDY Centre for Community Assistance and Training (CENCAT) - Copyright © 2011 Stage One: Forming During the forming stage, it is important for the facilitator to: Establish rapport among group members Encourage members to be comfortable with one another Make everyone feel accepted in the group Establish rules and guidelines for both task and relational behavior Encourage the group to be comfortable with the organization

18 18 EDUSTUDY Centre for Community Assistance and Training (CENCAT) - Copyright © 2011 Stage Two: Storming During the storming stage, it is important for the facilitator to: Defuse tensions Promote positive communication in the group Identify problems areas Facilitate conflict resolution processes

19 19 EDUSTUDY Centre for Community Assistance and Training (CENCAT) - Copyright © 2011 Stage Three: Norming If you’re a facilitator handling a group in the norming stage, it helps to: Practice skills in identifying possible solutions Define roles and expectations Manage change Help the group to reach a consensus

20 20 EDUSTUDY Centre for Community Assistance and Training (CENCAT) - Copyright © 2011 Stage Four: Performing When groups are able to successfully implement a new rule or system, they can begin a period of optimum productivity. The group goes into the height of task success: the performing stage. The relationships among group members also become more relaxed and involved.

21 21 EDUSTUDY Centre for Community Assistance and Training (CENCAT) - Copyright © 2011 Module Six: Building Consensus The aim of facilitated discussions is to create participatory groups: one where the goal is cooperative rather than competitive decision-making. All members should have equal input in the process, and equal opportunity to voice opposition to an idea or conclusion. In this module, we will discuss the key facilitation skills needed to build consensus: encouraging participation, gathering information, presenting information, synthesizing and summarizing. A genuine leader is not a searcher for consensus but a molder of consensus. Martin Luther King, Jr.

22 22 EDUSTUDY Centre for Community Assistance and Training (CENCAT) - Copyright © 2011 Encouraging Participation Provide preparation guidelines in the meeting agenda. Before starting a group meeting, check on everyone’s comfort level. State at the start of the meeting that members’ participation is not just welcome, but is integral to the process. Acknowledge responses. Avoid discounting responses. Solicit group members’ responses. Build on responses. Intentionally keep silent. Thanking the Group.

23 23 EDUSTUDY Centre for Community Assistance and Training (CENCAT) - Copyright © 2011 Gathering Information GO-ROUND. In this technique, each member of the group gets a turn to speak without getting interrupted. BREAK OUT GROUPS. In this technique, the facilitator divides the participants into smaller groups and then later allots time for a representative from each group to share their point of view. BRAINSTORMING. Brainstorming is a method of gathering information that involves getting as many ideas from the group in limited time. FISHBOWL METHOD. In the fishbowl method, a sample of the group discusses the topic, while the rest function as observers. Ideally, the discussion sample should represent the diversity in the group.

24 24 EDUSTUDY Centre for Community Assistance and Training (CENCAT) - Copyright © 2011 Presenting Information Separate presentation from discussion time. Assign a time particularly for presentation of information. Going back and forth between discussion and presentation can disrupt group process and may even make for ineffective decision-making. If there are more than one side to an issue, or more than one option in consideration, make sure you assign equal time for each. Process can be helped if each party feels that they are being treated fairly. Use a multi-media guide if possible. When presenting information, it helps to know that information can be presented in visual, auditory, and bodily/kinesthetic ways.

25 25 EDUSTUDY Centre for Community Assistance and Training (CENCAT) - Copyright © 2011 Synthesizing and Summarizing The following are some ways a facilitator can synthesize or summarize during a group discussion: Let the group summarize or synthesize for themselves. Example: Ask group members “What have we discussed so far?”, “What did you learn from this discussion?” or “What have we decided about this situation?” Ask a group member/ group members to provide a synthesis or summary. Offer your tentative synthesis/ summary and seek for the group’s clarification. For example: “This is what we have discussed so far….Did I miss anything out?” Refer to the agenda or published documentation in a flip chart paper. “So far, we have discussed Topic A and B. These are our resolutions…”

26 26 EDUSTUDY Centre for Community Assistance and Training (CENCAT) - Copyright © 2011 Module Seven: Reaching a Decision Point When it comes to the actual decision point, it helps that a facilitator knows ways to guide a group towards optimal decision-making. In this module, we will discuss ways to identify options, create a short list, and choose a shortlist. We will also use a way of deciding not often considered by many, called the multi-option technique. Choose always the way that seems the best, however rough it may be. Custom will soon render it easy and agreeable. Pythagoras

27 27 EDUSTUDY Centre for Community Assistance and Training (CENCAT) - Copyright © 2011 Identifying the Options Brainstorm. Brainstorming is the process of coming up with as many ideas as you can in the shortest time possible. Round Robin. Ask each member of the group to suggest one option for consideration. All members must contribute an idea. Facilitated SWOT Analysis. Some teams create each option as a group, and they do so by conducting a facilitated analysis of the organization’s strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats, as they relate to the problem.

28 28 EDUSTUDY Centre for Community Assistance and Training (CENCAT) - Copyright © 2011 Creating a Short List Costs and benefits. An ideal solution is one that has the least costs and most benefits. Disagreeing parties’ interests. An ideal solution has factored in the impact on all parties concerned and has made adjustments accordingly. Foresight. An ideal solution doesn’t have just short-term gains bit long term ones as well. Obstacles. An ideal solution has anticipated all possible obstacles in its implementation and has made plans accordingly. Values. An ideal solution is one that is consistent with the mission-vision of the organization and or its individual members.

29 29 EDUSTUDY Centre for Community Assistance and Training (CENCAT) - Copyright © 2011 Choosing a Solution Decide on a criterion (or criteria). Ask the group to come up with the criteria to be used to evaluate each option. These criteria could be costs and benefits, consistency with the values of the organization, feasibility, etc. Survey which options members like. A facilitator can also conduct a quick survey of what each group members like in the list. Survey which options members don’t like. Similarly, a facilitator can ask the group which options from the short list are no-no’s and eliminate them.

30 30 EDUSTUDY Centre for Community Assistance and Training (CENCAT) - Copyright © 2011 Using the Multi-Option Technique When coming up with solutions to an issue, you are not limited to choosing one best one. You can also pick several solutions to a problem, and follow through on these many solutions simultaneously. This is process called the multi-option technique. A group following the multi-option technique will assign a person or team to follow through on each option. The solutions followed through in a multi-option technique are not necessarily complimentary to one another.

31 31 EDUSTUDY Centre for Community Assistance and Training (CENCAT) - Copyright © 2011 Module Eight: Dealing with Difficult People In this module, we will discuss how to address disruptions, common types of difficult people in groups and how to handle them, and how to let the group resolve issues on their own. I think you have to work with people, and when I talk about managing relationships, don’t think about the derogatory “managed relationships. Anil Ambani

32 32 EDUSTUDY Centre for Community Assistance and Training (CENCAT) - Copyright © 2011 Addressing Disruptions Refocus the discussion on the agenda. If a disruption occurs, gently remind the group of the topic. Identify the intention behind the disruption and address it. Reiterate rules. You may refer to ground rules set at the beginning of the session. If no rule against the disruption exists, then take it as an opportunity to set one.

33 33 EDUSTUDY Centre for Community Assistance and Training (CENCAT) - Copyright © 2011 Common Types of Difficult People and How to Handle Them Type of Difficult Person DescriptionTypical Behavior Ways to Deal with Them Dominating These are members who monopolize the conversation and even overtly block other members from making a contribution. “I am the only one with experience in this matter. Let me tell you what to do.”  Solicit other members’ opinion. “We appreciate your experience and we’ll take what you said into account. But let’s see what others think too.” Aggressive Members who resort to personal attacks. “You just don’t know what you’re doing!”  Reiterate the ground rules. “We have agreed that there will be no personal attacks.”  Get back on topic. “Remember all comments are useful as long as they relate to the topic.  Re-state their position in objective terms Quiet and Non- Participative Group members can be quiet for a variety of reasons: they can be shy, intimidated, or uncomfortable joining in the topic.  Establish eye contact and invite them to join in. “We’d like to hear from people we haven’t heard from before. Could you give us your take on this issue?” Overly TalkativeMembers talk too much.  Remind them of the time limit.  Tell them you can only discuss one point at a time.  Ask them for key summary points.

34 34 EDUSTUDY Centre for Community Assistance and Training (CENCAT) - Copyright © 2011 Helping the Group Resolve Issues on Their Own The following are two ways a facilitator can help groups resolve issues on their own: Ignore. For cooperative teams, natural facilitators will emerge if the facilitator doesn’t make immediate interventions. Promote direct feedback. Ask the group members what they think about the situation or a particular person’s behavior.

35 35 EDUSTUDY Centre for Community Assistance and Training (CENCAT) - Copyright © 2011 Module Nine: Addressing Group Dysfunction In this module, we will discuss three ways to address group dysfunction: setting ground rules, restatement and reframing issues and keeping the discussion on track. The key elements in the art of working together are how to deal with change, how to deal with conflict, and how to reach our potential. Max DePree

36 36 EDUSTUDY Centre for Community Assistance and Training (CENCAT) - Copyright © 2011 Using Ground Rules to Prevent Dysfunction Ground rules in a group meeting can relate to: How to make the most of the meeting. How to make a contribution to the discussion. How members should treat other members. Issues relating to confidentiality. How violations of ground rules would be addressed.

37 37 EDUSTUDY Centre for Community Assistance and Training (CENCAT) - Copyright © 2011 Restating and Reframing Issues Some of the ways of restating and reframing includes: Changing “hot buttons” or value-laden words into neutral ones. Reminding the group of larger goals/ smaller goals the entire group is working on. Changing a problem into workable terms. Approaching an issue from another perspective.

38 38 EDUSTUDY Centre for Community Assistance and Training (CENCAT) - Copyright © 2011 Getting People Back on Track Review the agenda. Reflect to the group what is happening, and reintroduce the correct topic. Offer to put the off-topic on a “parking lot” for possible later discussion. Ask the group if they are finding the discussion helpful to the goal. Ignore the off-topic discussion and reintroduce the correct topic.

39 39 EDUSTUDY Centre for Community Assistance and Training (CENCAT) - Copyright © 2011 Module Ten: About Intervention In general, facilitators neither inject themselves in issues nor direct the flow of discussion; they merely go where the group wants to go. There are occasions, however, when stronger responses are needed to make the group more functional and productive. In this module, we will discuss what these stronger responses are, why they are necessary, and when is it appropriate to use them. It is always possible to argue against an interpretation, to confront interpretations, to arbitrate between them and to seek for an agreement, even if this agreement remains beyond our reach. Paul Ricoeur

40 40 EDUSTUDY Centre for Community Assistance and Training (CENCAT) - Copyright © 2011 Why Intervention May Be Necessary To help the group achieve their goals. If an on-going dynamic in the group is keeping the entire team from reaching their objective, then it’s time to intervene. To protect group process. If the integrity of the chosen methodology in getting results is being compromised, then a facilitator must intervene. To prevent the escalation of an issue. Generally, facilitators should let the group handle things on their own. To sample “skills” to the group. In some occasions, group members lack the skills to deal with a group issue.

41 41 EDUSTUDY Centre for Community Assistance and Training (CENCAT) - Copyright © 2011 When to Intervene The group is stuck. This means that the process is not producing results, or the process is not progressing to the next level. The group is about to move on to the next agenda without realizing that an important aspect of the discussion is unresolved or unaddressed. The group continues to follow a negative pattern despite soft interventions. (We will discuss levels of interventions in the next section.) Group process is being hampered by a dominant person or clique. Group members are misunderstanding each other. The facilitator perceives tension and suspiciousness in the group.

42 42 EDUSTUDY Centre for Community Assistance and Training (CENCAT) - Copyright © 2011 Levels of Intervention No intervention. Reflective Technique. Solicit the Group’s Observations. Interpret observations. Suggest solutions. Restructure the process or an aspect of it Confront

43 43 EDUSTUDY Centre for Community Assistance and Training (CENCAT) - Copyright © 2011 Module Eleven: Intervention Techniques In the previous module, we introduced intervention and the different levels of intervention. In this module, we will focus on particular intervention techniques: use of processes, boomerang it back, and ICE it. It is common sense to take a method and try it. If it fails, admit it frankly and try another. But above all, try something. Franklin Roosevelt

44 44 EDUSTUDY Centre for Community Assistance and Training (CENCAT) - Copyright © 2011 Using Your Processes As process experts, the best way a facilitator can intervene in an unproductive or dysfunctional group is by introducing a process that would directly address the problem or issue. If the problem is the lack of information about the issue in contention, the facilitator can make presentation part of the agenda. If the problem is a lack of understanding between management and staff, the facilitator can break the group into pairs of management and staff.

45 45 EDUSTUDY Centre for Community Assistance and Training (CENCAT) - Copyright © 2011 Boomerang it Back To “boomerang” an issue back is to present an issue back to the group for them to resolve. The reflective technique (discussed in the previous module) is one of the basic ways of mirroring an issue to a group. Another way to do this is to rephrase a group’s concern into a question addressed to the group. Or if a group member asks a facilitator a question, the facilitator can just bounce the question back.

46 46 EDUSTUDY Centre for Community Assistance and Training (CENCAT) - Copyright © 2011 ICE It: Identify, Check for Agreement, Evaluate How to Resolve ICE stands for: Identify Check for Agreement Evaluate How to Resolve. When you ICE it, you surface what the problem is, verify with the group its accuracy, and then start the process of looking for solutions.

47 47 EDUSTUDY Centre for Community Assistance and Training (CENCAT) - Copyright © 2011 Module Twelve: Wrapping Up Although this Course is coming to a close, we hope that your journey to improve your facilitation skills is just beginning. Please take a moment to review and update your action plan. This will be a key tool to guide your progress in the days, weeks, months, and years to come. We wish you the best of luck on the rest of your travels! This feeling, finally, that we may change things - this is at the center of everything we are. Lose that... lose everything. Sir David Hare

48 48 EDUSTUDY Centre for Community Assistance and Training (CENCAT) - Copyright © 2011 Words from the Wise Yogi Berra: In theory there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice there is. Dwight Eisenhower: Plans are nothing; planning is everything. Jonas Salk: The reward for work well done is the opportunity to do more.


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