Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Familial Roots of Adolescents’ Autonomy with Peers: Family Interactions as Predictors of Susceptibility to Peer Influence Joseph P. Allen University of.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Familial Roots of Adolescents’ Autonomy with Peers: Family Interactions as Predictors of Susceptibility to Peer Influence Joseph P. Allen University of."— Presentation transcript:

1 Familial Roots of Adolescents’ Autonomy with Peers: Family Interactions as Predictors of Susceptibility to Peer Influence Joseph P. Allen University of Virginia Collaborators: Maryfrances Porter Christy McFarland Penny Marsh Kathleen McElhaney Heather Tencer Sally Kaufman Farah Williams Debbie Land Martin Ho Jess Meyer Mindy Schmidt Glenda Insabella Copies of Today’s Talk & Related Papers will be available at:

2 The Transition from Parent- to Peer-Orientation Parents vs. Peers as influences? or, Parents via Peers as influences?? Peer Pressure and Negative Peer Influence as Primary Adolescent Challenges Susceptibility to Peer Pressure as an Autonomy Challenge “Giving in” as a lack of autonomy Links to Family Interactions??

3 Overarching Question: Does Autonomy with Parents Predict Developing Autonomy with Peers (i.e. resistance to peer influence)?

4 Sample 168 Adolescents, their Parents, and Best Friends Equal numbers of Males and Females Assessed Annually, Beginning at Age 13 Community-based Sample from a small urban area. Highly Socio-economically Diverse (Median Family Income= $38,000) 31% African American; 69% European American

5 Measures: Susceptibility to Peer Influence Experimental Paradigm “The Mars Task” 2 best friends separately decide which hypothetical characters will be rescued first following a space accident. The 2 friends are then brought together and come to a “consensus” answer. Susceptibility to Peer Influence = # of Disagreements where the Target Teen’s Position is NOT Adopted X 100% # of Total Disagreements Mean Score = 51% (i.e. teens and friends each change the other’s mind ~ half the time.)

6 Susceptibility to Peer Influence: Correlates, Predictors, and Sequelae Susceptibility to Peer Influence (13) Behavioral Markers: ?

7 Predicting Alcohol and Drug Use Problems from Susceptibility to Peer Influence Target Teen Problems with Alcohol and Drug Use R2R2 Total R 2 Step I. Gender (1=M; 2=F).04 Race (1=White; 2= Afr. Amer.) II. Susceptibility to Peer Influence.24**.06**.10** More susceptible teens have greater difficulty with alcohol and drug use.

8 Predicting Alcohol and Drug Use Problems from Susceptibility to Peer Influence Target Teen Problems with Alcohol and Drug Use R2R2 Total R 2 Step I. Gender (1=M; 2=F).04 Race (1=White; 2= Afr. Amer.) II. Susceptibility to Peer Influence.24**.06**.10** III. Peer Alcohol & Drug Usage IV. Peer Usage X Teen Susceptibility.25**.19*.10**.03*.16***.19***. Susceptibility moderates the effect of peer drug use on teen use.

9 Interaction of Peer Substance Use & Teen Susceptibility to Peer Influence Predicting Teen Substance Use More susceptible teens more closely mimic their peers’ levels of alcohol and drug use.

10 Predicting Likelihood of Prior Sexual Intercourse from Susceptibility to Peer Influence Previously Had Sexual Intercourse  χ 2 Odds Ratio Step I. Gender (1=M; 2=F) -.40*5.41*0.48* II. Susceptibility to Peer Influence.43*5.76*2.20* 11.51** Odds ratios are based on standardized predictor variables. More susceptible teens are twice as likely to become precociously sexually active as average teens.

11 Predicting Changes in Depressive Symptoms from Susceptibility to Peer Influence Depressive Symptoms Age 14 R2R2 Total R 2 Step I. Depressive Symptoms (Age 13).60***.36*** II. Gender (1= M; 2=F) *** III. Susceptibility to Peer Influence.14*.02*.39*** Note: β weights are from variable’s entry into model. Susceptibility predicts increasing levels of depressive symptoms over time

12 Susceptibility to Peer Influence: Correlates, Predictors, and Sequelae Susceptibility to Peer Influence (13) Behavioral Markers: Drug/Alcohol Use Depression Early Sex

13 Susceptibility to Peer Influence: Correlates, Predictors, and Sequelae Susceptibility to Peer Influence (13) Behavioral Markers: Drug/Alcohol Use Depression Early Sex Family Correlates: ?

14 Relation of Susceptibility to Peer Influence to Teen Recanting Behavior with Mother Susceptibility to Peer Influence (Observed) R2R2 Total R 2 Step I. Gender (1=M; 2=F) Step II. Teen Recanting Behavior with Mother (Observed during Interactions – Teen gives in without appearing persuaded).28***.08***.09*** Teens who give in overly easily to their mothers also give in very easily with their peers.

15 Relation of Susceptibility to Peer Influence to Maternal Psychological Control Susceptibility to Peer Influence (Observed) R2R2 Total R 2 Step I. Gender (1=M; 2=F) Step II. Maternal Psychological Control (Teen report, CRPBI, Guilt-inducing, Pressuring, and Autonomy-Undermining Behavior).19*.03*.04* Teens whose mothers are more psychologically controlling give in more easily to their peers.

16 Relation of Susceptibility to Peer Influence to Maternal Firm Control Susceptibility to Peer Influence (Observed) R2R2 Total R 2 Step I. Gender (1=M; 2=F) Step II. Maternal Firm Control (Maternal report, CRPBI).24***.05***.06*** Teens whose mothers exert more firm control give in more easily to their peers.

17 Relation of Susceptibility to Peer Influence to Unresolved Teen-Parent Disagreements Susceptibility to Peer Influence (Observed) R2R2 Total R 2 Step I. Gender (1=M; 2=F) Step II. Unresolved Disagreements (Paternal report, % of disagreements where “no one” decides the outcome).21*.04*.05* When “no one” resolves family disagreements, teens may avoid disagreements with peers by giving in easily.

18 Relation of Susceptibility to Peer Influence to Marital Dyadic Consensus Susceptibility to Peer Influence (Observed) R2R2 Total R 2 Step I. Gender (1=M; 2=F) Step II. Marital Dyadic Consensus (Maternal report, Dyadic Adjustment Scale) -.18*.03*.04* When teens’ see that their parents can’t agree with each other, they give in more easily to their peers.

19 Conjoint Predictors of Susceptibility to Peer Influence Susceptibility to Peer Influence (Observed) R2R2 Total R 2 Step I. Gender (1=M; 2=F) Step II. Unresolved Familial Arguments Matn’l Psychological Control Matn’l Firm Control Adolescent Recantations with Mthr. Marital Dyadic Consensus Statistics for Step.33***.27**.22*.19* ***.27*** These familial factors “add up” to a striking degree to predict teen susceptibility to peer influence. (Multiple R =.51***)

20 Susceptibility to Peer Influence: Correlates, Predictors, and Sequelae Susceptibility to Peer Influence (13) Behavioral Markers: Drug/Alcohol Use Depression Early Sex Family Correlates: Unresolved Arguments Teen recanting behavior Hi Maternal Control

21 Susceptibility to Peer Influence: Correlates, Predictors, and Sequelae Susceptibility to Peer Influence (13) Family Correlates: Unresolved Arguments Teen recanting behavior Hi Maternal Control Susceptibility to Peer Influence (14) Family Predictors: ? Behavioral Markers: Drug/Alcohol Use Depression Early Sex

22 Predicting Change In Susceptibility to Peer Influence from Unresolved Parent-Teen Arguments Susceptibility to Peer Influence (Age 14) (Observed) R2R2 Total R 2 Step I. Gender (1=M; 2=F) Step II. Susceptibility to Peer Influence (Age 13) Step III. Unresolved Parent-Teen Arguments (Maternal report).18*.04*.05* When “no one” resolves family disagreements, teens increasingly give in to their peers one year later.

23 Predicting Change In Susceptibility to Peer Influence from Overpersonalized Arguments by Mother Susceptibility to Peer Influence (Age 14) (Observed) R2R2 Total R 2 Step I. Gender (1=M; 2=F) Step II. Susceptibility to Peer Influence (Age 13) Step III. Overpersonalized Arguments by Mother (observed).18*.04*.05* Teens whose mothers’ overpersonalize disagreements increasingly give in to their peers one year later.

24 Predicting Change In Susceptibility to Peer Influence from Maternal Confidence in Arguments Susceptibility to Peer Influence (Age 14) (Observed) R2R2 Total R 2 Step I. Gender (1=M; 2=F) Step II. Susceptibility to Peer Influence (Age 13) Step III. Maternal Confidence in Arguments (observed).25**.07**.08* Teens whose mothers’ are highly confident in disagreements, increasingly give in to their peers one year later.

25 Predicting Change In Susceptibility to Peer Influence from Paternal Physical Aggression Toward Teen Susceptibility to Peer Influence (Age 14) (Observed) R2R2 Total R 2 Step I. Gender (1=M; 2=F) Step II. Susceptibility to Peer Influence (Age 13) Step III. Paternal Physical Aggression Toward Teen (Paternal report).24*.07*.08* Teens whose fathers’ are physically aggressive toward them increasingly give in to their peers one year later.

26 Susceptibility to Peer Influence: Correlates, Predictors, and Sequelae Susceptibility to Peer Influence (13) Family Correlates: Unresolved Arguments Teen recanting behavior Hi Maternal Control Susceptibility to Peer Influence (14) Family Predictors: Overpersonalized Arguments Maternal Confidence in Arguing Unresolved Arguments Paternal Phys. Aggression Behavioral Markers: Drug/Alcohol Use Depression Early Sex

27 Conclusions Copies of this paper are available at: Susceptibility to Peer Influence as an Autonomy Issue Linked to Critical Behavioral Outcomes Correlated With and Predicted by Familial Autonomy Processes Peers May be Quite Influential, but Parents DO Matter Autonomy Challenges Begin, But don’t End, In the Family

28


Download ppt "Familial Roots of Adolescents’ Autonomy with Peers: Family Interactions as Predictors of Susceptibility to Peer Influence Joseph P. Allen University of."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google