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An introduction to Ready, Set, Respect! GLSEN’s Elementary School Toolkit.

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Presentation on theme: "An introduction to Ready, Set, Respect! GLSEN’s Elementary School Toolkit."— Presentation transcript:

1 An introduction to Ready, Set, Respect! GLSEN’s Elementary School Toolkit

2 Copyright GLSEN, Inc., the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network. All rights reserved.1 What is GLSEN? GLSEN, the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network, is the leading national education organization focused on ensuring safe schools for all students, regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity/expression. GLSEN envisions a world in which every child learns to respect and accept all people.

3 Copyright GLSEN, Inc., the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network. All rights reserved. What is GLSEN?

4 Copyright GLSEN, Inc., the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network. All rights reserved.3 1. Explore current issues in K-12 schools. 2. Examine findings from GLSEN’s national research. 3. Explore Ready, Set, Respect! a toolkit specifically created to respond to the research findings. Our Objectives

5 Follow the following directions…

6 Are you READY? Copyright GLSEN, Inc., the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network. All rights reserved.5 Consider the following… Think back to a time in elementary school when you or a classmate may have been teased for not fitting in. What might an educator have done to disrupt this behavior or use it as a “teachable moment”? What representations of diverse families (those headed by same-sex couples, adoptive families, step-families, etc.) did you see in your elementary classes when you were in school? Do you recall you or your classmates ever being told that you were not behaving or dressing “boy enough” or “girl enough?” What about your classroom or school made students feel like this was acceptable?

7 Copyright GLSEN, Inc., the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network. All rights reserved.6 Research Base: Playgrounds and Prejudice Assesses teachers’ and students’ perceptions of school climate: Use of biased remarks, incl. homophobic language Culture re: gender expression and gender non-conformity Teaching of diversity, particularly family diversity Teacher Practices School Interventions

8 © GLSEN 2011 Purpose of the Study To understand… What leads to such high incidence of anti-LGBT behavior in secondary schools? What efforts in elementary school might subvert it? What efforts might encourage a climate of respect and diversity?

9 “Headlines” from the Research © GLSEN 2011

10 Bullying is a problem in elementary schools. © GLSEN % of elementary school students report that students at their school are called names, made fun of or bullied with at least some regularity. Nearly half (47%) of teachers believe that bullying, name-calling or harassment is a very or somewhat serious problem at their school.

11 Insults toward perceived intellectual ability and the use of ‘gay’ in a negative way are the most common types of biased language. © GLSEN 2011 Half of students (51%) and about half of teachers (45%) hear comments like “retard” or “spaz” from other kids at school sometimes, often or all the time. About half of students (45%) and teachers (49%) hear comments like “that’s so gay” or “you’re so gay” from other kids at school sometimes, often or all the time.

12 Although less common, homophobic remarks and negative remarks about race/ethnicity and religion are heard by a sizeable % of students. © GLSEN 2011

13 Remarks about gender stereotypes are commonly heard. © GLSEN 2011 Students Hear others make remarks about how boys should act or look (38%) Hear others make remarks about how girls should act or look (33%) Teachers Hear comments about a male acting or looking “too feminine” (25%) Hear comments about a female acting or looking “too masculine” (15%)

14 © GLSEN 2011 Almost 1 in 10 (8%) students report that they do not conform to traditional gender norms. (i.e. that they are a boy/girl who others “sometimes think act or look like a girl/boy”)

15 Compared to other students, gender non-conforming students: © GLSEN 2011 Called names, made fun of or bullied Have mean rumors or lies spread about them Feel very safe at school Miss school for safety reasons

16 The majority of teachers believe that educators have an obligation to ensure a safe and supportive learning environment for gender non-conforming students. © GLSEN 2011

17 The majority of teachers believe that educators have an obligation to ensure a safe and supportive learning environment for LGBT families.

18 © GLSEN 2011 The majority (85%) of teachers received PD on diversity and multicultural issues. However, just over a third (37%) have ever received PD on gender issues. And only a quarter (23%) have received PD on families with LGBT parents. A majority of teachers have, at some point (either in pre-service or on the job) received PD on diversity or multicultural issues but this PD is unlikely to have included content re: LGBT families or gender issues.

19 © GLSEN 2011 Most teachers have had professional development (PD) on bullying and harassment issues, although many believe they need more. Majority of teachers (85%) have personally received PD on bullying or harassment. About half (45%) feel they need further PD in this year.

20

21 Professional Development Instructional Guide Practical Resources Responds to the Needs of Educators

22 Professional Development Designed to provide educators with the tools they need to both teach respectfully and teach about respect! (getting Ready)

23 Instructional Guide Three Sets of Lessons focused on areas teachers and students identified as needs. (getting Set) Each Set contains lessons for grades K-2 and 3-5

24 23 Name-calling and Bullying

25 24 Family Diversity

26 25 Gender Roles and Diversity

27 Lessons aligned to: Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts McRel Standards

28 27

29 28

30 29 Two Dads, No Mom and Two Homes Ms. Ahl is beginning a social studies unit on families. To start the unit she asks the children to list all the people who are in their family and write something they like about each member. Later that day she hears Matt say to Christina, “How can he be your dad if he doesn’t live with you and you already have one dad?” Christina explains, “I have two dads but they are divorced.”

31 30 Up on the Roof A group of students are busy at work when a noise is heard from outside. Their curiosity draws them to the window where they see a tall ladder. Immediately they want to know if someone is on the ladder. Mr. Gomez says, “I don’t know. Do you think someone is up there?” The students answer yes but they can’t see. “Who do you think is up there?” Mr. Gomez inquires. One child says, “A man. He is fixing the roof.”

32 31 Dancing around Name-Calling A class of fourth grade children are brainstorming a list of topics they can write about during writing workshop. The conversation veers towards hobbies and Sami says he wants to write about his dance class. The next day he comes to school in jeans and his dance leotard. Mr. Breen overhears two boys teasing Sami in the hallway as Sami takes off his jacket, “That’s a girl’s shirt. You look weird!” “How come you’re wearing a girl’s body suit?” and “Sami’s a ballerina.” Both break out into laughter.

33 32 What is going on? Think as holistically as possible about the classroom and try to take the perspective of different students in the room. Did all students experience the situation the same way?

34 33 In what ways might the situation suggest that your students are READY for respect-related learning and how READY are you to engage them in that learning?

35 34 In what ways might the situation suggest that your students are READY for respect-related learning and how READY are you to engage them in that learning?

36 35 What learning possibilities and/or learning outcomes does such a moment seem to SET up? How might you use the moment for that learning (either in the moment or soon after)? What learning might result from not seizing the possibilities?

37 * Leads teachers to think deeply about why they would engage learners in the lesson and to consider the most effective time to do so. * Provides “essential questions” that each lesson is designed to consider. Each Lesson Plan: * Includes extension activities and suggested resources for further learning.

38 Tools that guide educators in developing inclusive and responsive practices. Practical Resources

39 38

40 Copyright GLSEN, Inc., the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network. All rights reserved.39

41 Let’s Get Ready and Set!

42 Questions?

43 Contact Name address Name address For more information and resources go to glsen.org


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