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Dr. Aric Krause, UMUC Dr. Matthew Prineas, UMUC.  Traditional Programs, with courses based on stand-alone subjects, may not take advantage of all a service.

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Presentation on theme: "Dr. Aric Krause, UMUC Dr. Matthew Prineas, UMUC.  Traditional Programs, with courses based on stand-alone subjects, may not take advantage of all a service."— Presentation transcript:

1 Dr. Aric Krause, UMUC Dr. Matthew Prineas, UMUC

2  Traditional Programs, with courses based on stand-alone subjects, may not take advantage of all a service member/veteran (SM/V) learned to DO in their service.

3  It’s not that the SM/V didn’t learn, its that what was learned may not translate easily to the constructs of the traditional academic program. ◦The problem is program design, not the SM/V.

4  Is there an alternative way to design programs that naturally invoke SM/V prior learning and experience more purposefully?

5 Definition: programs in which students progress toward a degree as they demonstrate mastery of new academic content (Kelchen, 2015, Landscape of Competency-based Education: Enrollments, Demographics, and Affordability, American Enterprise Institute)

6  Definition REVISED: programs in which students learn to demonstrate mastery of a program’s domain/field and related abilities.

7  FIXED: What a student must know and be able to do in order to graduate.  VARIABLE: time on task, path, overall time.

8  Unit of analysis is the program, not the course.  Focuses on behaviors/abilities as well as the content/knowledge.  Requires a total refocus on the end, away from the particular means.

9 1. Articulate what it is a student must know and be able to do when they graduate The articulation is not a list of “must understands”, but instead is about what the student can do with their knowledge. Validate with employers, accrediting organizations, professional standards.

10  How are traditional programs built?

11 A CB Program - Disaggregated Domain changes over time DomainAbilities A graduate should be able to DO all of the Abilities, deftly, within the context of their field/profession (Domain). Abilities apply continually

12  Traditionally-designed programs tend to focus primarily on domain. ◦The Reality: no matter how much time we spend on domain today, it will change – sometimes very quickly.  If we instead focus equally on abilities, such as how to learn and analyze, wherever the student or domain goes, the student has the capacity to keep up and move forward.

13 Example: Cyber Domain Abilities Detect an IntrusionLearn, Analyze, Evaluate Classify a ThreatResearch, Analyze, Evaluate, Prioritize Respond to a ThreatPlan, Implement, Lead Offensive/Defensive StrategyPlan, Implement, Communicate, Evaluate, innovate Find a threatEvaluate contexts, Analyze Develop PolicyFacilitate, communicate, analyze, create

14 Learn, Analyze, Evaluate, Research, Plan, Implement, Communicate, Contextualize, Create, Innovate, Facilitate, Prioritize Abilities  A student only achieves mastery of these things through carefully planned iterative repetition, over multiple domain contexts.  Repeat, repeat, repeat.

15 Program Design Challenge Learning Ability What a student must be able to DO to graduate; fixed Where are student starts is a variable Design carefully planned iterative repetition that moves student toward mastery of the domain and the abilities

16 Courses in the Program Learning Ability Course 1 Course 2 Course 3 Course 4 Course 5 Course 6 Courses become about the student practicing their abilities within the domain, over and over in a very intentional manner

17 Detect an Intrusion Classify a Threat Respond to a Threat Offensive/Defensive Strategy Find a threat Develop Policy Course 1 Course 2 Course 3 Course 4 Course 5 Course 6 Courses are no longer subject- specific; they are about doing what is contextually relevant within the profession or domain.

18  Each experience in each course: ◦Carefully mapped to program competencies; ◦Builds precisely on what was done prior; ◦Requires higher-order thinking, analysis, creation or innovation; ◦Contributes to the journey from where the student started to where they need to be; and ◦Contributes to their portfolio of career- relevant experiences.

19  CB programs naturally lend themselves to career-relevant contexts – real-world scenarios and exercises – allowing the student to build experience in the field.  Faculty Scholar/practitioners help students build their mastery at wielding the domain in these career-relevant contexts.

20  Bringing these important abilities to the forefront of the academic program may more purposefully invoke what the SM/V does in their service. Learn, Analyze, Evaluate, Research, Plan, Implement, Communicate, Contextualize, Create, Innovate, Facilitate, Prioritize Abilities

21  They may or may not be getting “credits” up front, but they can move faster and more purposefully by using the capacities they’ve built in their service.

22  The SM/V transitioning to a civilian career gets domain and ability mastery AND relevant experience in the field.

23  Refocuses the purpose and path of a degree to be laser focused on the end: the mastery required in a program.  How a student gets there (where/how they learn) is tertiary.  SM/V Can use the abilities they’ve mastered in their service to accelerate in ways not necessarily present in traditionally designed programs.

24  Transitioning all of its programs (undergrad and grad) to the CB approach ◦Working to validate what a student must know and be able to do with employers, accrediting and professional organizations. ◦Designing career-relevant learning demonstrations, in which students learn and demonstrate mastery.

25 Traditional Approach UMUC’s Approach Subject specific coursesLearning in real-world cross-functional applications. Get a passing gradeAchieve mastery through application Faculty as teachers – “sage on the stage” Faculty Practitioners as mentors, helping “guide on the side” Tests, quizzes, papersReal-world learning activities that mirror the profession. General understanding/ knowledge recall Contextual iterative application – creation, synthesis Theory & conceptsAbilities & Domain built through application Traditional program design Program goals continuously updated and aligned with employers, standards bodies, professional organizations,

26 Thank You!


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