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National Conference Niagara Falls May 2014 MOVING THE NEEDLE ON HIGH SCHOOL COMPLETION DAWN LEONARD KAREN LOVE KRISTIN JOHNSTON.

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Presentation on theme: "National Conference Niagara Falls May 2014 MOVING THE NEEDLE ON HIGH SCHOOL COMPLETION DAWN LEONARD KAREN LOVE KRISTIN JOHNSTON."— Presentation transcript:

1 National Conference Niagara Falls May 2014 MOVING THE NEEDLE ON HIGH SCHOOL COMPLETION DAWN LEONARD KAREN LOVE KRISTIN JOHNSTON

2 Education Stream Services Preschool Parent Talk Rogers Raising the Grade JUMP Math Beltline Youth Center All In for Youth Hera Aboriginal Services

3 THE CALGARY CONTEXT In 2013, Calgary had a population of 1.15 million people Oil and gas plays a primary role in our economy and has a direct impact on our workforce Calgary is located in Blackfoot Territory and has seen an increase in the urban Aboriginal population Pockets of poverty throughout the city

4 OUR CITY’S REALITY FOR GRADUATION Every year in Calgary, 3,000 youth drop out of high school 25% of Calgary youth do not finish high school on time 42% of high school graduates do not go on to further education 70% of new jobs require some post-secondary education Graduate vs. non-graduate report for Urban Aboriginal Youth $15,850 is the estimated annual cost to our society for every high school dropout

5 COLLECTIVE IMPACT MODEL A theoretical model that works in and with the community and tackles collective and complex issues How do we capitalize on our resources in our community Proto-typing implementing a model that is adaptable and based on learning Collective impact models are meant to be long-term (5-10 years) Common agenda establishing a “wicked question”

6 OUR WICKED QUESTION “Will a series of supports and services assist youth in completing high school” WHO ARE OUR COMMUNITY STAKEHOLDERS? Convener (United Way) Other non-profits Funders School divisions For-profit companies Parents

7 COLLABORATION Collaboration between BGCC, the partners and agencies that we work with has been an essential component to the success of our programs. Some of our key learnings came from: RADAR HERA ALL IN FOR YOUTH CIRCLE OF SUPPORTS

8 OUR ROAD TO SUCCESS IN CALGARY Remove barriers to high school completion Connect youth to positive adults Bring youth back to school and engage them in their education Individualized supports and programming Encourage varied paths of learning and career success Change attitudes and behaviors

9 BUILDING PROGRAMS FOR MULTI-RISK YOUTH Youth who are seriously disconnected need to engage in comprehensive and intentional programming. Youth need supports to engage with this programming and then to transition. There needs to be collaboration. The program should engage in a trauma informed approach. Address root causes. Engage in evaluation

10 SUCCESS OF OUR PROGRAMS RADAR: served 130 youth from Hera: served 72 young women from All In For Youth: served 174 youth since 2013

11 BEST AND PROMISING PRACTICES Strength based approach Assessment of readiness Involve the families Wraparound supports Advocacy Transitional supports

12 STRENGTH BASED APPROACH Trauma Informed Care Focusing on areas of strengths as a resource for development areas. View the youth as a resource who is capable of changing, growing and becoming connected to their community. Allowing the youth to make mistakes and learn from them, educating that mistakes don't equal failure. Celebrating all successes

13 STAGES OF CHANGE Typically found in addiction work Supports the idea of meeting youth and families where they are at Fosters trust in working relationships Empowers youth and families

14 FAMILY CONNECTIONS Enhancing family connections and relationships Connecting youth and families to natural supports Helping families connect to community resources Helping families identify strengths

15 CONNECTING WRAP AROUND SUPPORTS Building a team that has the best interest of the youth at the forefront Having someone to act as a point person and to ensure efficient and effective communication Providing system navigation Quality information sharing

16 ADVOCACY Acting as an advocate can include challenging ‘norms’ within processes and establishments. Supporting and teaching youth how to advocate for themselves. Working within the best interest of the youth and the systems to ensure quality of service and care.

17 RECREATIONAL AND SUMMER PROGRAMMING Providing healthy activities during critical hours with the hope they are sustained once the youth leaves the program. A combination of activities that are within and out with their comfort level is optimal. Giving the youth voice and choice to foster individual interests and skills. Offering programming that is group based or one-to-one

18 TRANSITIONAL SUPPORTS Imperative for youth both pre and post program to promote engagement. Strengthens relationships between youth, family and supports. Essential for identifying and attaining goals. Facilitates system navigation.

19 How to implement these practices into programs It starts with your program development, design and evaluation ex: logic model, program description, program goals Integrate service delivery tools that compliment the desired outcomes and foster the practice within your program ex: outcome star, satisfaction surveys. Train and coach the staff team, provide learning opportunities and share new strategies ex: team meeting discussions, reading clubs, program evaluation as a team, foster learning and ownership.

20 Now for some activities………

21 Questions? Dawn Leonard Director of Education, Employment and Aboriginal Initiatives Karen Love Manager of Education Initiatives Kristin Johnston Program Coordinator


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