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Tuck Everlasting: Part 2 by Natalie Babbitt. Chapter 9 Read to find out Angus Tuck’s reaction when he meets Winnie.

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Presentation on theme: "Tuck Everlasting: Part 2 by Natalie Babbitt. Chapter 9 Read to find out Angus Tuck’s reaction when he meets Winnie."— Presentation transcript:

1 Tuck Everlasting: Part 2 by Natalie Babbitt

2 Chapter 9 Read to find out Angus Tuck’s reaction when he meets Winnie.

3 “…it was as if they had slipped in under a giant colander. The late sun’s brilliance could penetrate only in scattered glimmers, and everything was silent and untouched, the ground muffled with moss and sliding needles, the graceful arms of the pines stretched out protectively in every direction.”

4 Chapter 9 – Otherwise known as…?

5 black stove washtub oak wardrobe m/upholstery-supplies- pricing.html cotton batting CHAPTER 10

6 What can you infer about the Tucks/their lifestyle based on the items in their house?

7 Chapter 10 Read to find out about Mae Tuck’s attitude toward her situation of living forever.

8 What’s the Purpose of the Hyperbole? Under the pitiless double assaults of her mother and grandmother, the cottage where [Winnie] lived was always squeaking clean, mopped and swept and scoured into limp submission.

9 “Into it all came Winnie, eyes wide, and very much amazed. It was a whole new idea to her that people could live in such disarray, but at the same time she was charmed. It was…comfortable. …she thought to herself: ‘Maybe it’s because they think they have forever to clean it up.’ And this was followed by another thought, far more revolutionary: ‘ Maybe they just don’t care!’” Why was it “revolutionary” for Winnie to think that the Tucks might not care about cleaning their house?

10 Chapter 10 Why did the author spend three pages describing the Tucks’ house? Do you think she achieved the effect that she wanted? Can you tell from Natalie Babbitt’s descriptions that she was an artist before she became a writer?

11 “ ’We’re plain as salt, us Tucks. We don’t deserve no blessings – if it is a blessing. And, likewise, I don’t see how we deserve to be cursed, if it’s a curse.’” A blessing or a curse? What do YOU think?

12 Chapter 10 – Otherwise known as…?

13 sympathy (sim′ · p ə ·thē) Chapter 11

14 Part of speech: Noun Definition: feeling sorry for someone Example: I felt sympathy for my friend when her grandfather passed away. Ask: How might you show someone sympathy? Related word: sympathetic (adjective) sympathy (sim′ · p ə ·thē)

15 Chapter 11 Read to find out why Winnie’s happy mood changes.

16 Chapter 11 “It was a good supper…., but they ate sitting about in the parlor instead of around a table. Winnie had never had a meal that way before and she watched them carefully at first, to see what rules there might be that she did not know about. But there seemed to be no rules. Jesse sat on the floor and used the seat of a chair for a table, but the others held their plates in their laps. There were no napkins. It was all right, then, to lick the maple syrup from your fingers. Winnie was never allowed to do such a thing at home, but she had always thought it would be the easiest way. And suddenly the meal seemed luxurious. What is the effect of the author’s use of so many contrast words in this paragraph?

17 (Tuck) “We got to get you home as fast as we can. I got a feeling this whole thing is going to come apart like wet bread.” FORESHADOW ALERT!

18 (Tuck) “But first we got to talk, and the pond’s the best place. The pond’s got answers. Come along, child. Let’s go out on the water.” What do you think Tuck means by, “The pond’s got answers”? Read Chapter 12 and then confirm/adjust your ideas.

19 Chapter 11 – Otherwise known as…?

20 rage (rāj) Chapter 12

21 Part of speech: Verb Definition: to speak or act angrily against something/someone Example: Kevin raged against the mistreatment that he suffered at the hands of the bullies. Ask: How is “raging” different from “being upset”? Related word: rage (noun) Other meaning: When something is popular and fashionable, you say it is “all the rage.” rage (rāj)

22 rigid (rij′ · id)

23 Part of speech: Adjective Definition: stiff; not bending Example: I was rigid with fright just at the thought of going through the haunted house. I couldn’t seem to take the first step toward the door. Ask: What is an antonym for “rigid”? Related word: rigidity (noun) rigid (rij′ · id)

24 anguish (aŋ′ · gwish)

25 Part of speech: Noun Definition: great suffering or pain Example: The man’s family was in anguish when the doctor told them that he only had a few months to live. Ask: How is anguish different from rage? How are they similar? anguish (aŋ′ · gwish)

26 Read to find out what Tuck means by, “The pond’s got answers.” Chapter 12

27 “The sky was a ragged blaze of red and pink and orange, and its double trembled on the surface of the pond like color spilled from a paintbox. The sun was dropping fast now, a soft red sliding egg yolk, and already to the east there was a darkening to purple.”

28 “This water, you look out at it every morning, and it looks the same, but it ain’t. All night long it’s been moving, coming in through the stream back there to the west, slipping out through the stream down east here, always quiet, always new, moving on…. it’s always there, the water’s always moving on, and someday, after a long while, it comes to the ocean.” “The water slipped past [the boat], out between clumps of reeds and brambles, and gurgled down a narrow bed, over stones and pebbles, foaming a little, moving swiftly now after its slow trip between the pond’s wide banks. And, farther down, Winnie could see that it hurried into a curve, around a leaning willow, and disappeared. “[The water] was black and silky now; it lapped at the sides of the rowboat and hurried on around them into the stream.” What “answer about life” was the water giving, according to Tuck?

29 “Know what happens then?” said Tuck. “To the water? The sun sucks some of it up right out of the ocean and carries it back in clouds, and then it rains, and the rain falls into the stream, and the stream keeps moving on, taking it all back again. It’s a wheel, Winnie. Everything’s a wheel, turning and turning, never stopping.”

30 “Everything’s a wheel, turning and turning, never stopping. The frogs is part of it, and the bugs, and the fish, and the wood thrush, too.”

31 “And people. But never the same ones. Always coming in new, always growing and changing, and always moving on. That’s the way it’s supposed to be. That’s the way it is.”

32 I can tell that Tuck has a negative attitude toward his situation. PROVE IT!

33 “…dying’s part of the wheel, right there next to being born. You can’t pick out the pieces you like and leave the rest. Being part of the whole thing, that’s the blessing. But it’s passing us by, us Tucks. Living’s heavy work, but off to one side, the way we are, it’s useless, too. It don’t make sense. If I knowed how to climb back on the wheel, I’d do it in a minute. You can’t have living without dying. So you can’t call it living, what we got. We just are, we just be, like rocks beside the road.”

34 “…dying’s part of the wheel, right there next to being born. You can’t pick out the pieces you like and leave the rest. Being part of the whole thing, that’s the blessing. But it’s passing us by, us Tucks. Living’s heavy work, but off to one side, the way we are, it’s useless, too. It don’t make sense. If I knowed how to climb back on the wheel, I’d do it in a minute. You can’t have living without dying. So you can’t call it living, what we got. We just are, we just be, like rocks beside the road.”

35 Why type(s) of persuasive appeal is Tuck using to convince Winnie that living forever is not a good thing? LOGIC (REASON)EMOTION (FEELINGS) ETHICS (VALUES)AUTHORITY (SOURCES)

36 Which sentence best shows that Tuck does not like his situation of living forever? A “What in the world could possibly happen to me?” B “The pond’s got answers.” C “If I knowed how to climb back on the wheel, I’d do it in a minute.” D “Everything’s a wheel, turning and turning, never stopping.”

37 Which sentence best shows that Tuck does not like his situation of living forever? A “What in the world could possibly happen to me?” (Tuck said that.) B “The pond’s got answers.” C “If I knowed how to climb back on the wheel, I’d do it in a minute.” D “Everything’s a wheel, turning and turning, never stopping.”

38 Which sentence best shows that Tuck does not like his situation of living forever? A “What in the world could possibly happen to me?” B “The pond’s got answers.” (Tuck said that.) C “If I knowed how to climb back on the wheel, I’d do it in a minute.” D “Everything’s a wheel, turning and turning, never stopping.”

39 Which sentence best shows that Tuck does not like his situation of living forever? A “What in the world could possibly happen to me?” B “The pond’s got answers.” C “If I knowed how to climb back on the wheel, I’d do it in a minute.” D “Everything’s a wheel, turning and turning, never stopping.”

40 Which sentence best shows that Tuck does not like his situation of living forever? A “What in the world could possibly happen to me?” B “The pond’s got answers.” C “If I knowed how to climb back on the wheel, I’d do it in a minute.” D “Everything’s a wheel, turning and turning, never stopping.” (Tuck said that.)

41 Which sentence best shows that Tuck does not like his situation of living forever? A “What in the world could possibly happen to me?” B “The pond’s got answers.” C “If I knowed how to climb back on the wheel, I’d do it in a minute.” ” D “Everything’s a wheel, turning and turning, never stopping.”

42 “…it’s something you don’t find out how you feel until afterwards…. ‘Cause they wouldn’t know till after, and then it’d be too late.” What are some real-life examples of someone thinking something sounded good at first but realizing afterward that it wasn’t so great?

43 Chapter 12 – Otherwise known as…?

44 earnest (ʉr′ · nist) Chapter 14

45 Part of speech: Adjective Definition: very serious and sincere Example: Carly had an earnest desire to succeed in school. Ask: How are earnest and solemn similar? Related word: earnestly (adverb) earnest (ʉr′ · nist)

46 Chapter 13: Read to find how the actions of the man in the yellow suit advance the plot. Chapter 14: Read to find out what Jesse asks Winnie to do.

47 Chapters 13 & 14 Quiz “Winnie lay there with her eyes wide. She felt cared for and – confused…. She remembered guiltily that at supper she had decided [the Tucks] were criminals. Well, but they were. And yet…” What happened in Chapter 14 that caused Winnie to feel this way?

48 What do you think is the motive of the man in the yellow suit? “Sometime later, the man in the yellow suit slipped down from the saddle and tied the Tucks’ old horse to a bar of the Fosters’ fence…. the man said quickly, ‘Ah! Good evening! May I come in? I have happy news for you. I know where they’ve taken the little girl.”

49 Chapter 13 is only one paragraph long. Only a half page. Why do you think the author made this such a short chapter? What is the effect?

50 Chapter 14 “ ‘You’re too much of a worrier. There’s nothing we can do about it now, so there’s no sense fussing.’” How does this quote from Mae make sense with what we know about her/her personality?

51 What do we learn about Winnie’s hopes … …and fears in Chapter 14?

52 Chapter 14 “ ‛You resting easy, child?’” “‛I know it ain’t very happy for you here….’” “‛I guess we don’t know how to do with visitors. But still and all, it’s a good feeling….’” “‛…if you want something, will you holler?’” “‛I’m just in the next room – I’d be out here like a shot.’” “You think on it, Winnie Foster….’” How does the Tucks’ dialect/conversational voice affect your perception of them?

53 Chapter 13 – Otherwise known as…?

54 Chapter 14 – Otherwise known as…?

55 Chapter 15 Read to find out what lie(s) the man in the yellow suit tells the Fosters. How does this advance the plot?

56 Chapter 15 What is the importance of this chapter to the novel?

57 Chapter 15 How would your understanding of the story at this point be different if it were written from only Winnie’s point of view (a limited point of view), rather than from an omniscient point of view?

58 Chapter 15 – The Missing Scene With a small group, write/act out the conversation that Winnie’s parents and grandmother might have had after the man in the yellow suit left their house.

59 Chapter 15 – Otherwise known as…?

60 courteous (kʉrt′ · ē · əs) Chapter 16

61 Part of speech: Adjective Definition: polite Example: The staff members who worked at the fancy hotel were very courteous to their guests when they spoke. Ask: What is an antonym of “courteous”? Related word: courtesy (noun) courteous (kʉrt′ · ē · əs)

62 Chapter 16 Read to find out what the constable is like and how he creates tension for the man in the yellow suit.

63 Chapter 16 – Otherwise known as…?

64 Quiz Time! Chapters 9-16

65 Chapter 17 Read to find out why Miles didn’t have his own family drink from the spring.

66 Overcrowded? “It’d be nice,” [Winnie] said, “if nothing ever had to die.” “Well, now, I don’t know,” said Miles. “If you think on it, you come to see there’d be so many creatures, including people, we’d all be squeezed in right up next to each other before long.” Winnie squinted at her fishing line and tried to picture a teeming world. “Mmm,” she said, “yes, I guess you’re right.”

67 Overcrowded? Read an excerpt from the book, The Population Explosion. Is overcrowding a real issue in today’s world?

68 How do the ideas presented in The Population Explosion connect with the ideas shared by Tuck and Miles? “…it’s something you don’t find out how you feel until afterwards…. ‘Cause they wouldn’t know till after, and then it’d be too late.” -Tuck “It’d be nice,” [Winnie] said, “if nothing ever had to die.” “Well, now, I don’t know,” said Miles. “If you think on it, you come to see there’d be so many creatures, including people, we’d all be squeezed in right up next to each other before long.”

69 How well do you know the Tucks? Complete the “What are the Tucks’ Takes on Everlasting Life?” activity.

70 Chapter 17 – Otherwise known as…?

71 survey (s ə r · vā′) Chapter 18

72 Part of speech: Verb Definition: to look at/consider the whole Example: The teacher surveyed the class to see who was still working on their assignment. Ask: What might a ship’s captain be looking for if he were surveying the ocean? Related words: survey (noun) surveyor (noun) survey (s ə r · vā′)

73 contented (k ə n · tent′ · id)

74 Part of speech: Adjective Definition: satisfied, happy with how things are Example: Ricardo had a contented smile on his face after his performance in the school play. Ask: How is contented different from elated? Related words: content (same meaning) contentedly (adverb) contented (k ə n · tent′ · id)

75 Chapter 18 Read to find out what spoils the happy mood at the Tucks’ house.

76 Chapter 18 – Otherwise known as…?

77 Chapter 19 As you read this chapter, gather more clues about why the music box has been important to the plot of the story.

78 Why has the music box been important to the plot of the story? It has helped tie together Mae, Winnie, and the man in the yellow suit. It has helped solve problems (like comforting Winnie) but has also created problems (like drawing the attention of the man in the yellow suit). “No connection, you would agree. But things can come together in strange ways.” Mae packed the music box, the one pretty thing she owned, when she went to meet the boys – never went anywhere without it … a faint, surprising wisp of music came floating near Winnie, her grandmother, and the man in the yellow suit … elf music… you’ve heard it before? … the man in the yellow suit whistled the melody as he left Mae played music to get Winnie to stop crying – “It was like a ribbon tying [Winnie] to familiar things.” – not elf music – no one who owned such a thing could be too disagreeable. The man in the yellow suit took his grandmother a music box – reminded her of a family she once knew – “It was a clue.” - “… two evenings ago, I heard that music box.”

79 Why is Chapter 19 important to the story?

80 Chapter 19 – Otherwise known as…?

81 envious (en′ · vē · əs) Chapter 20

82 Part of speech: Adjective Definition: jealous Example: Tamaria was envious of her friend who was going out with the cutest boy in the sixth grade. Ask: Have you ever been envious of someone? Related word: envy (noun) envious (en′ · vē · əs)

83 Chapter 20 Read to find out why Winnie and the Tucks are so concerned about the consequences of what Mae did.

84 Chapter 20 – Otherwise known as…?

85 Chapter 21 Read to find out about what it’s like for Winnie after she goes home.

86 Chapter 21 – Otherwise known as…?

87 Chapter 22 Read to find out Jesse’s and Winnie’s plans.

88 What’s the Purpose of the Hyperbole? It was the hottest day yet, so heavy that the slightest exertion brought on a flood of perspiration, an exhaustion in the joints.

89 Purpose of Repetition At the beginning of the book in Chapter 3, Winnie said to the toad, “I’m not exactly sure what I’d do, you know, but something interesting – something that’s all mine. Something that would make some kind of difference in the world.” In Chapter 22, it says, “Winnie clutched the little bottle in her hands and tried to control the rising excitement that made her breath catch. At midnight she would make a difference in the world.” Why does the author mention the same idea about Winnie’s making a difference in the world – once at the beginning of the book and again toward the end?

90 Chapter 22 – Otherwise known as…?

91 exultant (eg · zult′ · 'nt) Chapters 23 & 24

92 Part of speech: Adjective Definition: very happy and proud Example: Cody and his friends were exultant when the Mavericks won the championship. Ask: Is there a difference between feeling elated and feeling exulant ? Related words: exult (verb) exultation (noun) exultant (eg · zult′ · 'nt)

93 Chapters 23 & 24 As you read, pay attention to how the changing weather reflects the events in the story.

94 “It was the longest day: mindlessly hot, unspeakably hot, too hot to move or even think…. You could not shut it out.” “But later… the sky was changing. The air was noticeably heavier. It pressed on Winnie’s chest and made her breathing difficult.” “…there was a wind beginning, small gusts that rattled the fence gate and set the trees to rustling. The smell of rain hung sweet in the air.” “Outside, the wind had stopped. Everything, it seemed, was waiting.” “Outside, the night seemed poised on tiptoe, waiting, waiting, holding its breath for the storm.” “The storm was moving nearer. “ “Then – a flash of lightning and, soon after, a crack of thunder….. Again a flash of lightning, and this time a crashing burst of noise from the swirling sky.” “And then the first drop of rain plopped precisely on the tip of [Winnie’s] nose.” “When the thunder came, it tore the sky apart with its roar, and as it came, she pulled herself through, and dropped to the cot inside, unharmed.” “The next obliging roll of thunder saw [the window frame] wedged once more into place.” “Rain came in sheets now, riding the wind, flung crosswise through the night. Lightning crackled, a brilliant, jagged streak, and thunder rattled the little building. The tension in the parched earth eased and vanished. Winnie felt it go. “

95 What’s the Purpose of the Hyperbole? It was the longest day: mindlessly hot, unspeakably hot, too hot to move or even think. (p. 89)

96 Purpose of Repetition The thunder ebbed. Winnie’s heart sank. What if it was all impossible? What if the window would never come out? What if... She looked over her shoulder at the dark shape of the gallows, and shuddered. Again a flash of lightning, and this time a crashing burst of noise from the swirling sky. Miles yanked. The window frame sprang free, and still grasping it by the bars, he tumbled backward off the box. The job was done. Two arms appeared in the hole left by the missing frame. Mae! Her head appeared. It was too dark to see her face. The window – what if it was too small for her to squeeze through? What if... But now her shoulders were out.... Mae was free.

97 Chapters 23 & 24 – Otherwise known as…?

98 accomplice ( ə ·käm′ · plis) Chapter 25

99 Part of speech: Noun Definition: a person who helps someone commit a crime Example: The robber’s accomplice drove the get-away car. Ask: Do you think an accomplice is as guilty as the “main criminal”? Related words: accomplish complicit accomplice ( ə ·käm′ · plis)

100 wistful (wist′ · f ə l)

101 Part of speech: Adjective Definition: sad because you want something and know you cannot have it Example: As Kandice looked back over the pictures from her vacation last year, she felt wistful. Ask: Is wistful more or less sad than melancholy? Related words: wistfulness (noun) wistfully (adverb) wistful (wist′ · f ə l)

102 revulsion (ri · vul′ · sh ə n)

103 Part of speech: Noun Definition: a strong feeling of disgust or disapproval Example: Nancy was filled with revulsion when her brother help up the slimy frog. Ask: What is an antonym for “revulsion”? Related word: revulsive (adjective) revulsion (ri · vul′ · sh ə n)

104 Chapter 25 The toad returns! Read to find out why. Warning: Prepare for flash- forwards and flashbacks!

105 Flash-forward (p. 97) Which words/phrases indicate that the story has “flashed forward” in time since the end of the last chapter? The first week of August was long over. And now, though autumn was still some weeks away, there was a feeling that the year had begun its downward arc, that the wheel was turning again, slowly now, but soon to go faster, turning once more in its changeless sweep of change. Winnie, standing at the fence in front of the touch-me-not cottage, could hear the new note in the voices of the birds. Whole clouds of them lifted, chattering, into the sky above the wood, and then settled, only to lift again. Across the road, goldenrod was coming into bloom. And an early-drying milkweed had opened its rough pod, exposing a host of downy-headed seeds. As she watch, one of these detached itself into a sudden breeze and sailed sedately off, while others leaned from the pod as if to observe its departure. Winnie dropped down cross-legged on the grass. Two weeks had gone by since the night of the storm, the night of Mae Tuck’s escape. And Mae had not been found…. It had been a trying two weeks.

106 Flash-forward (p. 97) Which words/phrases indicate that the story has “flashed forward” in time since the end of the last chapter? The first week of August was long over. And now, though autumn was still some weeks away, there was a feeling that the year had begun its downward arc, that the wheel was turning again, slowly now, but soon to go faster, turning once more in its changeless sweep of change. Winnie, standing at the fence in front of the touch-me-not cottage, could hear the new note in the voices of the birds. Whole clouds of them lifted, chattering, into the sky above the wood, and then settled, only to lift again. Across the road, goldenrod was coming into bloom. And an early-drying milkweed had opened its rough pod, exposing a host of downy-headed seeds. As she watch, one of these detached itself into a sudden breeze and sailed sedately off, while others leaned from the pod as if to observe its departure. Winnie dropped down cross-legged on the grass. Two weeks had gone by since the night of the storm, the night of Mae Tuck’s escape. And Mae had not been found…. It had been a trying two weeks.

107 Flashback (pp ) How can you tell that Winnie’s thoughts have “flashed back” to what happened the first week in August? “For the hundredth time she reviewed it all: how the constable had come into the cell soon after she had settled herself on the cot; how he had let down a shutter over the window to keep out the rain; how, then, he had stood over her as she hunched under the blanket...; how, finally, he had gone away and not come back till morning. But oh! – it made her tremble still to remember the constable’s face when he found her.

108 Flashback (pp ) How can you tell that Winnie’s thoughts have “flashed back” to what happened the first week in August? “For the hundredth time she reviewed it all: how the constable had come into the cell soon after she had settled herself on the cot; how he had let down a shutter over the window to keep out the rain; how, then, he had stood over her as she hunched under the blanket...; how, finally, he had gone away and not come back till morning. But oh! – it made her tremble still to remember the constable’s face when he found her.

109 Flashback (pp ) What is the purpose of this flashback? (How does it help the reader?) “For the hundredth time she reviewed it all: how the constable had come into the cell soon after she had settled herself on the cot; how he had let down a shutter over the window to keep out the rain; how, then, he had stood over her as she hunched under the blanket...; how, finally, he had gone away and not come back till morning. But oh! – it made her tremble still to remember the constable’s face when he found her. It helps the reader know what happened between the time that the Tucks escaped and the time that Chapter 25 starts, when Winnie is back at home later in the year.

110 Back to the Present! (p. 99) Which words/phrases indicate that the flashback is over? Winnie sighed and plucked at the grass around her ankles. School would open soon. It wouldn’t be so bad. In fact, she thought as her spirits lifted, this year might be rather nice. And then two things happened….

111 Back to the Present! (p. 99) Which words/phrases indicate that the flashback is over? Winnie sighed and plucked at the grass around her ankles. School would open soon. It wouldn’t be so bad. In fact, she thought as her spirits lifted, this year might be rather nice. And then two things happened…. Not “had sighed” or “had plucked” Talking about the future Not “had happened”

112 Chapter 25 – Otherwise known as…?

113 Epilogue Flash forward to find out what happened to Winnie. Did she drink the water???

114 Now We Know…. How does Tuck feel about Winnie’s decision not to drink the water? How can you tell? How does Mae feel about Winnie’s decision? How can you tell?

115 Chapter 3 How does Natalie Babbitt use the toad to craft an ironic ending? Ironic: Odd or amusing because it is the opposite of what is expected or meant to happen

116 Quiz Time! (Chapter 17 – Epilogue)

117 Resolution/ Denouement Introduction/ Exposition Rising Action Falling Action The Novel in a Nutshell Turning Point – sometimes also the Climax

118 Winnie’s Metamorphosis Work with a partner/small group to complete the “Winnie’s Metamorphosis” activity.

119 How does this story address our darkest fears and greatest hopes? How did Winnie’s hopes and fears change throughout the story? What can we learn about our own hopes and fears from this story?

120 What do we learn about the real world and how it should be lived? What can we learn from Winnie and the other characters about how to live our lives?

121 Choose a character from the novel. What trades did that character make? Are there any trades that you think he/she regrets? Which trades affected him/her the most? Write a letter or monologue from that character’s point of view, talking about the trades that they have made and how those trades have affected their life. What do we learn about the impact of our decisions/choices on our lives (the “trades” that we make)?


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