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Local Children’s Partnerships Reducing teenage conceptions - everybody’s business! Jayne Shelbourn-Barrow, Strategic Manager Teenage Pregnancy, HPDW Team.

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Presentation on theme: "Local Children’s Partnerships Reducing teenage conceptions - everybody’s business! Jayne Shelbourn-Barrow, Strategic Manager Teenage Pregnancy, HPDW Team."— Presentation transcript:

1 Local Children’s Partnerships Reducing teenage conceptions - everybody’s business! Jayne Shelbourn-Barrow, Strategic Manager Teenage Pregnancy, HPDW Team

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3 The impact on the outcomes for children and young people who become teenage parents less likely to finish their education, and more likely to bring up their child alone and in poverty; The infant mortality rate for babies born to teenage mothers is 60% higher than for babies born to older mothers; Teenage mothers have three times the rate of post- natal depression of older mothers and a higher risk of poor mental health for three years after the birth

4 The impact on the outcomes for children of teenage parents Children of teenage mothers are generally at increased risk of poverty, low educational attainment, poor housing and poor health, and have lower rates of economic activity in adult life

5 Key facts and measures – national data Provisional 2009 under-18 conception data shows 5.7% reduction from 2008 – bringing decline from 1998 to 18.1% Under 18 conceptions and births to lowest level for nearly 30 years. % leading to abortion is 49.0% Provisional 2009 under 16 conception data shows a rate of 7.5 – a decrease of 4% from the 2008 rate with 60.2% leading to abortion.

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7 Hampshire Data Provisional 2009 Hampshire under 18 conception data was 28.9 showing a decrease of 5.1 from the final 2008 rate of This was an decrease in the number of conceptions from 819 to 687 (less 132). Our percentage reduction from 1998 is now -19.6% ( %). The England % reduction is -18.1% and the South East region -20.4%.

8 Evidence review Vast majority of teenage pregnancies are unplanned Provision of high quality SRE (Kirby 2007) and improved use of contraception (Santelli 2008) are areas where strongest empirical evidence exists on impact on teenage pregnancy rates Qualitative evidence identifies senior leadership, workforce training and effective use of data as also being critical No evidence that alternative approaches (e.g. abstinence-based/benefit conditionality) are effective

9 So how are we doing in Basingstoke & Deane? For the under 18 conception rate ( data) – 3rd highest rated district with a conception rate of 34.0 (per 1000 young women)for under 18’s (with 48% resulting in abortion) In number terms this means an average of 97 conceptions per year (2.4 decrease from ) no. of conceptions = 291 (21 decrease from 312 in ) For the under 16 conception rate ( data) – 3 rd highest rated district with a conception rate of 7.2 (with 59% resulting in abortion). Numbers approx 20 per year REMEMBER a good % of these are our most vulnerable young women

10 Hampshire Districts – U18 conception rate Hampshire County rate ( ) number ( ) % leading to abortion ( ) % change in rate 98/00 – 07/09 Hampshire31.5 (32.7)2266 (2366)52% (53%) Gosport52.3 (56.9)223 (245)44% (48%) 3.4% Havant41.7 (42.5)281 (292)50% (49%) -33.9% Rushmoor33.4 (41.2)173 (208)50% (51%) -18.7% Basingstoke34.0 (36.4)291 (312)48% (50%) -6.6% Test Valley33.1 (31.8)219 (211)55% (55%) 10.3% New Forest29.6 (30.0)270 (276)50% (53%) -9.7% Eastleigh33.9 (31.3)237 (223)54% (54%) 6.7% Fareham28.9 (29.6)177 (184)66% (64%) -3.5% East Hampshire24.5 (26.0)166 (178)50% (52%) 6.7% Winchester20.9 (21.4)134 (136)58% (60%) 0.4% Hart18.5 (19.7)95 (101)54% (60%) -13.4%

11 B&D Wards WARDUnder 18 UNDER 18 CONCEPTION RATE IMD Score 2007 Popley West Eastrop South Ham Buckskin Brookvale and Kings Furlong Popley East Norden Brighton Hill North Brighton Hill South Pamber Tadley North Tadley South Winklebury Basing East Woodhay

12 Some new challenges since 1998 (when the TP strategy baseline data was calculated) ▪ Increasing use of the internet and mobile phone technology by young people ▪ Early sexualisation and celebrity culture ▪ Alcohol-fuelled sexual activity – and the impact on consensual, safe relationships ▪ Potential impact of recession on poverty and aspiration ▪ A tougher financial climate in public services – doing more with less!

13 Good practice examples to support improvements in Hampshire Helping schools to improve delivery of SRE Improving access to contraception (GET IT ON website, community schemes, clinics in FE colleges, outreach) Children’s Trust SRE policy / workforce development programme Promoting work on teenage pregnancy within the wider health and well-being agenda (health and well- being drop ins on school sites) Work of Children’s centres in supporting teenage parents Helping parents to talk to their children about SRE (Speakeasy and Teen Triple P)

14 Good Practice in B&D – Sure Start Children’s Centres Linked midwives and health visitors to each CC Young parents groups established Postnatal and baby clinics running in centres PEEP programme – 0-3 yrs Antenatal programme – joint delivery through HV/midwifery /FSOW and delivered in the community Breastfeeding support – young parents trained as supporters Links with vulnerable pregnancy group at NHH Speakeasy programme JCP support and advice

15 Amy is 17 years old Amy is currently pregnant Amy has a supportive partner who is working Amy’s mum is going to evict her from the family home Amy’s attendance was poor at school Amy is currently not in work, education on training Amy has low self esteem Amy does not have many friends Amy does not have a good relationship with her parents Amy is currently being treated for a Sexually Transmitted Infection What could your agency have done to improve this young person’s outcomes?

16 Charlie is 18 years old and a dad Charlie’s girlfriend has just had a baby Charlie is excited about becoming a dad but also very scared Charlie has a good relationship with his mum but doesn’t see his dad None of Charlie’s friends are dads and he is feeling overwhelmed Charlie is worried about how he will provide for his family as he currently doesn’t have a job Charlie obtained some GCSE’s and went to college but dropped out of college as he didn’t like the course. What could your agency have done to improve this young person’s outcomes?

17 Daisy is a school pupil Daisy is 15 years old Daisy has just discovered she is 18 weeks pregnant Daisy’s mum has informed the school she is pregnant Daisy has not told any of her friends she is pregnant and is scared of their reaction Daisy’s boyfriend is also 15 years old and Daisy is worried he might get in trouble with the police for getting her pregnant Daisy’s attendance has never been good at school and now her mum is worried now that she is pregnant she may use this as an excuse not to go to school What could your agency have done to improve this young person’s outcomes?

18 How can local children’s partnerships contribute to improvement? A member of the Local Children’s Partnership should sit on the Local Implementation Team (LIT) for TP The LIT should be a sub group of the Local Partnership The LCP should provide challenge for LIT The LCP should ensure that TP ‘everyone’s business’


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