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1 THEN, PIERCED, HE CAST HIMSELF UPON HIS LIFELESS FRIEND; THERE, AT LAST, HE FOUND HIS REST IN DEATH. FORTUNATE PAIR! IF THERE BY ANY POWER WITHIN MY.

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Presentation on theme: "1 THEN, PIERCED, HE CAST HIMSELF UPON HIS LIFELESS FRIEND; THERE, AT LAST, HE FOUND HIS REST IN DEATH. FORTUNATE PAIR! IF THERE BY ANY POWER WITHIN MY."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 THEN, PIERCED, HE CAST HIMSELF UPON HIS LIFELESS FRIEND; THERE, AT LAST, HE FOUND HIS REST IN DEATH. FORTUNATE PAIR! IF THERE BY ANY POWER WITHIN MY POETRY, NO DAY SHALL EVER ERASE YOU FROM THE MEMORY OF TIME…. The Death of Nisus and Euryalus. Aeneid IX. 590+

2 2 …the agreeable manner in which he immediately fell into conversation, though it was only on its being a wet night and on the probability of rainy season, made her feel that the commonest, dullest, and most threadbare topic might be rendered interesting by the skill of the speaker. Pride and Prejudice, Lizzy on Wickham, 57

3 3 In this connexion I sometimes wonder whether it can be right for a prudent theologian, philosopher, or other such person of precise and delicate conscience to write history. How can they pledge their word on a popular belief? How can they answer for the thoughts of unknown persons? Montaigne, On the Power of the Imagination, 47

4 4 Whatever I have done was done of set purpose, for I wished to show you how to be a wife, to teach these people how to choose and keep a wife, and to guarantee my own peace and quiet as long as we were living beneath the same roof. Decameron, X.X Gualtieri to Griselda, 793

5 5 Ulysses, in whose persons and hardships Homer painted a living portrait of prudence and forbearance; Virgil, too, in the person of Aeneas, portrayed the valor of the devoted son…they were depicted not as they were, but as they should have been, to serve as examples of virtue to men who came after them. Don Quixote, DQ to Sancho, 193

6 6 And as she looked at him she began to smile, for though she had not said a word, he knew, of course he knew, that she loved him. He could not deny it. And smiling she looked out of the window and said (thinking to herself, Nothing on earth can equal this happiness)— To the Lighthouse, Mr. + Mrs. Ramsay, 124

7 7 If man in fact is not a scoundrel—in general, that is, the whole human race—then the rest is all mere prejudice, instilled fear, and there are not barriers, and that’s just how it should be!... Crime and Punishment, Raskolnikov to himself, 27

8 8 Where be your gibes now? Your gambols, your songs, your flashes of merriment that were wont to set the table on a roar? Not one now, to mock your grinning? Hamlet, Hamlet on Yoric,

9 9 I’VE KEPT CLOSE TRACK, TO SNATCH HIS SCALP; ONE CAN’T ABSOLVE A MAN WHO’S NOT REPENTED, AND NO ONE CAN REPENT AND WILL AT ONCE; THE LAW OF CONTRADICTION WON’T ALLOW IT. Inferno, XXVII (Bertran, father v. son)

10 10 FOR WHEREVER THE HUMAN SOUL TURNS ITSELF, OTHER THAN TO YOU, IT IS FIXED IN SORROWS, EVEN IF IT IS FIXED UPON BEAUTIFUL THINGS, WHICH WOULD NEVERTHELESS MEAN NOTHING IF THEY DID NOT HAVE THEIR BEING FROM YOU. The Confessions, IV.15. (p.61)

11 11 We could go away and stay together on one of our various country estates, shunning at all costs the lewd practices of our fellow citizens and feasting and merry-making as best we may without in anyway over-stepping the bounds of what is reasonable. Decameron, Prologue

12 12 I SHALL HELP YOU WITH MY WEALTH. AND SHOULD YOU WANT TO SETTLE THIS KINGDOM ON EQUAL TERMS WITH ME, THEN ALL THE CITY I AM BUILDING NOW IS YOURS. Dido to Aeneas, The Aeneid,

13 13 But vanity, not love, has been my folly. Pleased with the preference of one, and offended by the neglect of the other, on the very beginning of our acquaintance I have courted prepossession and ignorance, and driven reason away, where either were concerned; Till this moment I never knew myself! Pride and Prejudice, Lizzy, 156

14 14 Lying is man’s only privilege over all other organisms. If you lie—you get to the truth! Lying is what makes me a man! Crime and Punishment, Razumikhin, 202

15 15 She sensed that he had changed somehow. She had never read a line of his poetry. She thought that she knew how it went though, slowly and sonorously. It was seasoned and mellow. It was about the desert and the camel. It was about the palm tree and the sunset. It was extremely impersonal; it said something about death; it said very little about love. To the Lighthouse, Lily on Carmichael, 195

16 16 HERE WAS THE COMPANY OF THOSE WHO SUFFERED WOUNDS, FIGHTING FOR THEIR HOMELAND, AND OF THOSE WHO, WHILE THEY LIVED THEIR LIVES, SERVED AS PURE PRIESTS; AND THEN THE PIOUS POETS, THOSE WHOSE SONGS WERE WORTHY OF APOLLO, THOSE WHO HAD MADE LIFE MORE CIVILIZED WITH NEWFOUND ARTS… The Underworld, Aeneid, VI

17 17 …madness is so to speak, a logical error, an error of judgment, a mistaken view of things. He would gradually prove his patient wrong, and imagine, they say he achieved results! Crime and Punishment, Lebezyatnikov to Rask, 424

18 18 TO MAKE CONVERSATION, TO SHARE A JOKE, TO PERFORM MUTUAL ACTS OF KINDNESS, TO READ TOGETHER WELL-WRITTEN BOOKS, TO SHARE IN TRIFLING AND SERIOUS MATTERS, TO DISAGREE WITHOUT ANIMOSITY—JUST AS A PERSON DEBATES WITH HIMSELF—AND IN THE VERY RARITY OF DISAGREEMENT TO FIND THE SALT OF NORMAL HARMONY, TO TEACH EACH OTHER SOMETHING OR TO LEARN FROM ONE ANOTHER…THIS IS WHAT WE LOVE IN FRIENDS. The Confessions, IV.13 (p.60)

19 19 HUMAN BEINGS OBTAIN NORMAL PLEASURES OF HUMAN LIFE NOT AS THEY COME ON UNEXPECTEDLY AND AGAINST OUR WILL, BUT AFTER DISCOMFORTS WHICH ARE PLANNED AND ACCEPTED BY DELIBERATE CHOICE. The Confessions, VIII.7. (p.138)

20 20 But here begins a new account, the account of man’s gradual renewal, the account of his gradual regeneration, his gradual transition from one world to another, his acquaintance with a new, hitherto completely unknown reality. Crime and Punishment, the end, 551

21 21 STEP BY STEP WE CLIMBED BEYOND ALL CORPOREAL OBJECTS AND THE HEAVEN ITSELF, WHERE SUN, MOON, AND STARS SHED LIGHT ON THE EARTH. WE ASCENDED EVEN FURTHER BY INTERNAL REFLECTION AND DIALOGUE AND WONDER AT YOUR WORKS, AND WE ENTERED INTO OUR OWN MINDS. WE MOVED UP BEYOND THEM SO AS TO ATTAIN THE REGION OF INEXHAUSTIBLE ABUNDANCE WHERE YOU FEED ISRAEL ENTERNALLY WITH TRUTH FOR FOOD. The Confessions, IX.24. (p.171)

22 22 When he is drunk asleep, or in his rage, Or in th’inscestuous pleasure of his bed, At game, a-swearing, or about some act That has no relish of salvation in’t— Hamlet, Hamlet at Claudius’s confession,

23 23 THIS IS HIS DECISION: TO GO OUT AND EXPLORE THIS FOREIGN COUNTRY, TO LEARN WHAT SHORES THE WIND HAS BROUGHT HIM TO, WHO LIVES UPON THIS LAND—IT IS UNTILLED— ARE THEY WILD BEASTS OR MEN—AND THEN TO TELL HIS COMRADES WHAT HE HAS FOUND. Aeneas, The Aeneid, I

24 24 He rose at once. “I was not bowing to you, I was bowing to all human suffering,” he uttered somehow wildly, and walked to the window. Crime and Punishment, Rask to Sonya, 321

25 25 Mother and child then—objects of universal veneration, and in this case the mother was famous for her beauty—might be reduced, he pondered, to a purple shadow without irreverence. To the Lighthouse, Bankes on Lily’s painting, p. 52

26 26 O YOU POSSESSED OF STURDY INTELLECTS, OBSERVE THE TEACHING THAT IS HIDDEN HERE BENEATH THE VEIL OF VERSES SO OBSCURE. Purgatorio, IX (Dante to the Reader)

27 27 AND LET YOUR COMRADES, TOO, KEEP FAST THIS PRACTICE OF SACRIFICE, YOURSELF MAINTAIN THE CUSTOM; AND MAY YOUR PIOUS SONS CONTINUE IT. Helenus, channeling Apollo, Aeneid III

28 28 The greatest madness a man can commit in this life is to let himself die, just like that, without anybody killing him or any other hands ending his life except those of melancholy. Don Quixote, Sancho to Alonso Quexana, 937

29 29 BECAUSE I SEVERED THOSE SO JOINED, I CARRY—ALAS—MY BRAIN DISSEVERED FROM ITS SOURCE, WHICH IS WITHIN MY TRUNK. AND THUS IN ME ONE SEES THE LAW OF COUNTER-PENALTY. Inferno, XXVIII

30 30 THE BODY OBEYED THE SLIGHTEST INCLINATION OF THE SOUL TO MOVE THE LIMBS AT ITS PLEASURE MORE EASILY THAN THE SOUL OBEYED ITSELF, WHICH ITS SUPREME DESIRE COULD BE ACHIEVED EXCLUSIVELY BY THE WILL ALONE. The Confessions, VIII.20. (p.147)

31 31 But to persever In obstinate condolement is a course of impious stubbornness. ‘Tis unmanly grief. It shows a will most incorrect to heaven, A heart unfortified, a mind impatient, An understanding simple and unschooled. HamletAct I, Claudius on Hamlet

32 32 HOW SUPERIOR ARE THE FABLES OF THE MASTERS OF LITERATURE TO THESE DECEPTIVE TRAPS!...VERSES AND POETRY I CAN TRANSFORM INTO REAL NOURISHMENT. The Confessions, III.11. (p.42)

33 33 Our indiscretion sometime serves us well When our deep plots do pall, and it should learn us There’s divinity that shapes our ends… Hamlet, H to Horatio, 5.2.8, Hamlet on Yoric,

34 34 You all say heaven made me beautiful, so much that this beauty of mine, with a force you can’t resist, makes you love me; and you say and even demand that, in return for the love you show me, I must love you…but I can’t see why, for this reason alone, a woman who’s loved for her beauty should be obliged to love whoever loves her. Don Quixote, Marcela on Grisistomo’s suicide

35 35 His immense self-pity, his demand for sympathy poured and spread itself in pools at her feet, and all she did, miserable sinner that she was, was to draw her skirts a little closer round her ankles, lest they should get wet. To the Lighthouse, Lily + Mr. Ramsay, 152

36 36 I am, you know, a bachelor, an unworldly and unknowing man, and, moreover, a finished man, a frozen man, sir, gone to seed… Crime and Punishment, Porfiry to Rask. 336

37 37 IT IS NOT LOVE OF PRAISE OR FAME HAS LEFT ME, DRIVE OFF BY FEAR, BUT THAT MY BLOOD IS CHILLED AND DULLED BY SLOW OLD AGE, MY BODY’S FORCE IS NUMB, IS COLD IF I COULD ONLY HAVE WHAT ONCE WAS MINE, THE YOUTH OF WHICH THAT SHAMELESS FELLOW THERE SO CONFIDENTLY BRAGS, I SHOULD HAVE BOXED, NOT BECAUSE OF PRAISE OR HANDSOME BULLOCK HAD TEMPTED ME; I DO NOT NEED REWARDS! Entulles to Aeneas, Aeneid, V

38 38 And if it were not because I imagine…did I say imagine?...because I know for a fact that all these discomforts are an integral part of the practice of arms, I would let myself die here out of sheer annoyance. Don Quixote, DQ to Sancho, 106

39 39 Yes, with all its greens and blues, its lines running up and across, its attempt at something. It would be hung in attics, she thought; it would be destroyed. But what did that matter? To the Lighthouse, Lily at the End, 208

40 40 At that point—I would have you see—the force To which one yielded mingles with one’s will; And no excuse can pardon their joint act. Absolute will does not concur with wrong; But the contingent will, through fear that its Resistance might bring greater harm, consents. Paradiso, IV.105+, Beatrice to Dante, 35-36

41 41 She had never seen a place for which nature had done more, or where natural beauty had been so little counteracted by awkward taste. Pride and Prejudice, Lizzy on Pemberly

42 42 But you no longer believe your own theory—what would you run away on? And what would you do to be a fugitive? It’s nasty and hard to be a fugitive… Crime and Punishment, Porfiry to Rask, 461

43 43 INDEED ONE WOULD DO BETTER TO LOVE THIS VISIBLE SUN, WHICH AT LEAST IS EVIDENT TO THE EYES, THAN TO THOSE FALSE MYTHOLOGIES WHICH USE THE EYES TO DECEIVE THE MIND. The Confessions, III.10. (p.41)

44 44 The man who knows how to enjoy his existence as he ought has attained an absolute perfection like that of the gods. Montaigne, On Experience, 496

45 45 THE EAGER MEN OF TYRE WORK STEADILY: SOME BUILD THE CITY WALLS OR CITADEL— THEY ROLL UP STONES BY HAND, AND SOME SELECT THE PLACE FOR A NEW DWELLING, MARKING OUT ITS LIMITS WITH A FURROW; SOME MAKE LAWS, ESTABLISH JUDGES AND A SACRED SENATE; SOME EXCAVATE A HARBOR; OTHERS LAY THE DEEP FOUNDATIONS FOR A THEATRE, HEWING TREMENDOUS PILLARS FROM THE ROCKS, HIGH DECORATIONS FOR A STAGE TO COME. Carthage. The Aeneid. I

46 46 The Aeneid  History  Inheritance  Piety  The Afterlife  Unruly emotion  Futurity  Sacrifice  Custom  Glory of State  Fate

47 47 The Confessions  Biography  Experience  Desire  Transgression  Memory  Transcendence  Disillusionment  Logic v. Faith  Interpretation

48 48 The Divine Comedy  Contrapasso  Redemption  Art  Penance  Journey  Transcendence  Dogma  Limits of Intellect  Interpretation  Humility

49 49 The Decameron  Education  Sex  Gender  Wit  Story-telling  Relativism  Transgression  Escape  Interpretation  Hypocrisy

50 50 The Essays  Biography  Experimentation  Experience  The Body  History  Self-Reliance  Moderation  Interpretation  Relativism  Subjectivity

51 51 Hamlet  Revenge  Objectivity  Loyalty  Mortality  Violence  Inheritance  Art/Acting  Madness  Interpretation  Fate

52 52 Don Quixote  Madness  Literature  The Imaginary  Idealism  Decay  History  Dogma  Genre  Fact v. Fiction  Faith

53 53 Pride and Prejudice  Interpretation  Custom  Dialogue  Marriage  Resistance  Class  Social Progress  Gender  Self-knowledge  Inheritance

54 54 Crime and Punishment  Transgression  Faith  Conversion  Pragmatism  Determinism  Genius  History  Class  Madness  Emotion v. Reason

55 55 To the Lighthouse  Multiplicity  Emotion v. Reason  Simultaneity  Memory  Art  Time  World War I  Gender  Experimentation  Domesticity

56 56 Does the progress of civilization depend upon great men? Is the lot of the average human being better now than in the time of the Pharoahs? Is the lot of the average human being, however, he asked himself, the criterion by which we judge the measure of civilization? Possibly not. To the Lighthouse, Mr. Ramsay, 42-3

57 57 I HAD BECOME DEAFENED BY THE CLANKING CHAIN OF MY MORTAL CONDITION, THE PENALTY OF MY PRIDE. I TRAVELLED VERY FAR FROM YOU, AND YOU DID NOT STOP ME. I WAS TOSSED ABOUT AND SPILT, SCATTERED AND BOILED DRY IN MY FORNICATIONS. AND YOU WERE SILENT. The Confessions, II.2. (p.24)

58 58 BUT OH THE IGNORANCE OF AUGERS! HOW CAN VOWS AND ALTERS HELP ONE WILD WITH LOVE? MEANWHILE THE SUPPLE FLAME DEVOURS HER MARROW; WITHIN HER BREAST THE SILENT WOUND LIVES ON. Describing Dido, Aeneid, IV

59 59 So you shall hear Of carnal, bloody, and unnatural acts, Of accidental judgments, casual slaughters, Of deaths put on by cunning and force cause, And, in this upshot, purposes mistook Fall’n on th’inventors heads. All this can I Truly deliver. Hamlet, Horatio over Hamlet’s body, ,

60 60 They had brewed for themselves a life different than hers; in Paris, perhaps; a wilder life; not always taking care of some man or other for there was in their minds a mute questioning of deference and chivalry, of the Bank of England and they Indian Empire, of ringed fingers and lace… To the Lighthouse, the Ramsay kids, 7

61 61 I HAVE INDEED DESERVED THIS; I DO NOT APPEAL AGAINST IT; USE YOUR CHANCE. BUT IF THERE IS A THOUGHT OF A DEAR PARENT’S GRIEF…SEND ME BACK OR, IF YOU WISH, SEND BACK MY LIFELESS BODY. FOR YOU HAVE WON…DO NOT PRESS YOUR HATRED FURTHER. Turnus to Aeneas. The Aeneid

62 62 A kissed mouth doesn’t lose its freshness: like the moon it turns up new again. Decameron, II.xiii, Alatiel story, 147-8

63 63 Without my swearing to it, you can believe that I would like this book, the child of my understanding, to be the most beautiful, the most brilliant, and the most discreet that anyone could imagine. But I have not been able to contravene the natural order; in it, like begets like. Don Quixote, Prologue, 3

64 64 I regard the place as a hotbed for diabolical rather than devotional activities. As far as I can judge, it seems to me that your pontiff, and all the others too, are doing their level best to reduce the Christian religion… Decameron, I.iii, Abraham, 41

65 65 HERE MULCIBER HAS MODELED NOMAD TRIBES AND AFRICANS, LOOSE-ROBED; THE CARIANS; THE LEGELES; GELONI ARMED WITH ARROWS. AND HE SHOWED EUPHRATES, MOVING NOW WITH HUMBLER WAVES; THE MOST REMOTE OF MEN, THE MORINI; THE RHINE WITH DOUBLE HORNS…. Shield of Aeneas, The Aeneid, VIII

66 66 None but you know whether you are cruel and cowardly, or loyal and dutiful. Others have no vision of you, but judge you of uncertain conjectures; they see not so much your nature as your artifices. Do not rely on your opinion, rely on your own. Montaigne, On Repentance, 239

67 67 BUT WHAT VICIOUS ACTS CAN HURT YOU? YOU ARE NOT CAPABLE OF BEING DAMAGED. OR WHAT INJURIES CAN BE INFLICTED UPON YOU WHO CANNOT BE HARMED? YOUR PUNISHMENT IS THAT WHICH HUMAN BEINGS INFLICT ON THEMSELVES…THEIR WICKED ACTIONS ARE AGAINST THEIR OWN WICKED SOULS. The Confessions, III.16 (p.47)

68 68 How incomplete speech is, how weak, when set against my thought! And this, to what I saw to such—to call it little is too much Eternal light, You only dwell within Yourself, and only You know you; Self-knowing, Self-known, You love and smile upon yourself! Paradiso, XXXIII. Dante describing Heaven, 121+

69 69 But in my anguish I have on occasion derived much relief from the agreeable conversation and the admirable expressions of sympathy offered by friends, without which I am firmly convinced that I should have perished. However, the One who is infinite decreed by immutable law that all earthly things should come to an end. Decameron, Prologue, 1

70 70 …you should strive, in plain speech, with words are straightforward, honest, and well-placed, to make your sentences and phrases sonorous and entertaining, and have them portray, as much as you can and as far as possible, your intention, making your ideas clear without complicating and obscuring them. Don Quixote, Prologue, 8

71 71 And finally, after a series of further eulogies, he came round to the subject they were discussing, stoutly maintaining that she was the most chaste and honest woman to be found anywhere on earth. Decameron, II.ix, Ambrogiulo, 166

72 72 Fortunate the age and fortunate the times called golden by the ancients, not because gold, which in this our age of iron is so highly esteemed, could be found then with no effort, but because those who lived in that time did not know the words thine and mine. In that blessed age all things were owned in common… Don Quixote, DQ’s “Golden Age” speech, 76

73 73 I have a great pleasure in thinking you will be happily settled. I have not a doubt of your doing very well together. Your tempers are by no means unlike. You are each of you so complying that nothing will ever be resolved on… Pride and Prejudice, Mr. Bennet to Jane, 260

74 74 The people go astray; it is very much easier to follow the side-path, where the edges serve as a check and a guide, than to keep to the middle of the road, which is broad and open. It is easier to follow art than nature but it is also much less noble and commendable. Montaigne, On Experience, 399

75 75 There are two kinds of lineage in the world: some who trace and derive their ancestry from princes and monarchs, which time has gradually undone, and in the end they finish in a point, like a pyramid turned upside down; others have their origin in lowborn people, and they rise by degrees until they become great lords. Don Quixote, DQ to Sancho, 161

76 76 But that expression, ‘violently in love’ is so hackneyed, so doubtful, so indefinite, that it gives me very little idea. It is as often applied to feelings which arise from a half- hour’s acquaintance as to a real, strong attachment. Pride and Prejudice, Mrs. Gardiner to Lizzy, 106

77 77 I’ve brought you here through intellect and art; From now on, let your pleasure be your guide; You’re past the steep and narrow paths. Look at the sun that shines upon your brow; Look at the grasses, flowers, and the shrubs Born here, spontaneously, of the earth. Purgatorio, XXVII. Virgil to Dante, 130+

78 78 I found myself heavily weighed down with the sense of being tired of living and scared of dying. I suppose that the more I loved him, the more hatred and fear I felt for the death which had taken him from me, as if it were my most ferocious enemy. Confessions, 59

79 79 There was something else I wanted to know; something else was nudging my arm. I wanted to find out then, and find out quickly, whether I was a louse like all the rest, or a man? Would I be able to step over or not! Crime and Punishment, Rask to Sonya, 419

80 80 …historians must and ought to be exact, truthful, and absolutely free of passions, for neither, interest, fear, rancor, nor affection should make them deviate from the path of the truth, whose mother is history, the rival of time, repository of great deeds, witness to the past, example and adviser to the present, and forewarning to the future. Don Quixote, Cervantes on the original DQ manuscript, 68

81 81 Her mind was less difficult to develop. She was a woman of mean understanding, little information, and uncertain temper. When she was discontented she fancied herself nervous. Pride and Prejudice, On Mrs. Bennet, 3

82 82 AND TIME AND TIME AGAIN THAT READING LED OUR EYES TO MEET, AND MADE OUR FACES PALE, AND YET ONE POINT ALONE DEFEATED US. WHEN WE HAD READ HOW THE DESIRED SMILE WAS KISSED BY ONE WHO WAS SO TRUE A LOVER, THIS ONE, WHO NEVER SHALL BE PARTED FROM ME, WHILE ALL HIS BODY TREMBLED, KISSED MY MOUTH. A GALLEHAULT INDEED, THAT BOOK AND HE WHO WROTE IT… Inferno, V (Francesca)

83 83 As we see ground that lies fallow…to produce a sound and natural birth must be fertilized with different seed, so it is with our minds. If we do not occupy them with some definite subject which curbs and restrains them, they rush wildly to and from in the ill-defined field of the imagination. Montaigne, On Idleness, 27

84 84 “DO YOU NOT ASK WHO ARE THESE SPIRITS WHOM YOU SEEK BEFORE YOU? I’D HAVE YOU KNOW, BEFORE YOU GO AHEAD, THEY DID NOT SIN; AND YET, THOUGH THEY HAVE MERITS, THAT’S NOT ENOUGH, BECAUSE THEY LACKED BAPTISM, THE PORTAL OF FAITH THAT YOU EMBRACE…FOR THESE DEFECTS, AND FOR NO OTHER EVIL, WE NOW ARE LOST AND PUNISHED JUST WITH THIS…” Inferno, IV (Virgil to Dante)

85 85 The reason for the unreason to which my reason turns so weakens my reason that with reason I complain of thy beauty. And also when he read:…the heavens on high divinely heighten thy divinity with the stars and make thee deserving of the deserts they greatness deserves. Don Quixote, Alonso Quexana reading, 20

86 86 This same cause…governs the heart and the lungs, and the pulse, the sight of a charming object imperceptibly spreading within us the flame of a feverish emotion. Are these the only muscles and veins that swell and subside without our consent, not only of our will, but also our thoughts? Montaigne, On the Power of the Imagination, 43

87 87 Not a whit, we defy augury. There is special Providence in the fall of a sparrow. If it be now, ‘tis Not to come; if it be not to come, it will be now; if it Be not now; yet it will come. The readiness is all. Hamlet, Hamlet

88 88 And in order to oppose the laws of Nature, one has to possess exceptional powers, which often turn out to have been used, not only in vain, but to the serious harm of those who employ them. Decameron, Intro to Day 4, Boccaccio, 290

89 89 Indeed, we seem to have to other criterion of truth and reason than the type and kind of opinions and customs current in the land where we live. Montaigne, On Cannibals, 109

90 90 I have often observed how little young ladies are interested by books of a serious stamp, though written solely for their benefit. It amazes me, I confess—for certainly, there can be nothing so advantageous to them as instruction. Pride and Prejudice, Mr. Collins, 52

91 91 Without thinking highly of men or matrimony, marriage had always been her object; it was the only honourable provision for well-educated women of a small fortune, and however uncertain of giving happiness, must be their pleasantest preservation of want. Pride and Prejudice, Charlotte Lucas, 93

92 92 And I say to you, my lord, that the same applies to the three laws which God the Father granted to his three peoples, and which formed the subject of your inquiry. Each of them considers itself the legitimate heir to His estate, each believes it possesses His one true law and observes his commandments. Decameron, I.iv, Melchizedek to Saladin, 44

93 93 Loveliness and stillness clasped hands in the bedroom, and among the shrouded jugs and sheeted chairs even the prying of the wind, and the soft rose of the clammy sea airs, rubbing, snuffling, iterating, and reiterating their questions—“will you fade? Will you perish?” To the Lighthouse, Time Passes, 129

94 94 What other books, what other words, what other letters, are more sacred, more reputable, more worthy of reverence, than those of the Holy Scriptures? And yet there have been many who, by perversely construing them, have led themselves and other to perdition. All things have their own special purpose, but when they are wrongly used a great deal of harm may result… Decameron, Epilogue, 800

95 95 He wept out of six eyes; and down three chins, tears gushed together with a bloody froth. Within each mouth—he used it like a grinder— with gnashing teeth he tore to bits a sinner, so that he brought pain to three at once. Inferno, XXIV. Lucifer

96 96 WHEN I AM IN THIS STOREHOUSE, I ASK THAT IT PRODUCE WHAT I WANT TO RECALL, AND IMMEDIATELY CERTAIN THINGS COME OUT; SOME THINGS REQUIRE A LONGER SEARCH, AND HAVE TO BE DRAWN OUT AS IT WERE FROM MORE RECONDITE RECEPTACLES. The Confessions, X.12 (p.185)

97 97 Hamlet, cast of characters  Hamlet  Hamlet, Sr.  Gertrude Claudius  Ophelia Laertes Rosencrantz Guildenstern Horatio  Marcellus Fortinbras Osric Player-King Polonius  Yoric

98 98 Crime and Punishment Characters  Raskolnikov Sonya Dunya Raskolnikov Porfiry Razumikin Svidrigailov Marmeladov Lizaveta The Pawnbroker Lt. Gunpowder Katerina Ivanova Nastasya Petrovna Pulcheria Raskolnikov Marfa Petrovna Luzhin Zossimov

99 99 Pride and Prejudice  Elizabeth Bennet Charles Darcy Mr. Bennet Mrs. Bennet  Jane  Mary Kitty Lydia Mr. Collins Charlotte Lucas Lady Catherine de Bourgh Anne de Bourgh Mr. Bingley  Miss Bingley Mr. Wickham Colonol Fitzwilliam Georgiana Darcy Mr + Mrs. Gardiner  Sir Lucas + Lady Lucas Maria Lucas

100 100 To the Lighthouse  Mr. Ramsay Mrs. Ramsay Lily Briscoe Charles Tansley Augustus Carmichael William Bankes Paul Rayley Minta Doyle Mrs. McNab Macalister James, Prue, Andrew, Cam, Jasper,  Roger, Rose, and Nancy Ramsay

101 101 Don Quixote  Don Quixote  Alonso Quexana  Sancho Panza  Dulcinea  Aldonza  The Priest  The Barber  Dorotea  Zoidara  Don Diego  Don Lorenzo  Amadis of Gaul  Cide Benengali  Master Pedro  Cardenio  Marcela  Grisostomo  Princess Minocomina

102 102 Decameron  Alatiel  Abraham  Saladin  Ambruglio  Zinerva  Bernabo  Griselda  Gualtieri  Alibech  Rustico  San Ciappaletto  Jehannot  Count of Antwerp  Masetto the Gardener  Madonna Fillippa  Giotto

103 103 The Aeneid  Aeneas  Dido  Creusa  Anchises  Pyrrhus  Turnus  Lavinia  Latinus  Amata  Pallas  Nisus  Euryalus  Dares  Entullus  Polydorus  The Sibyll  Juno  Camilla  Evander (Pallas’ Dad)


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