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Introducing the Selection Literary Focus: Narrator and Irony Reading Skills: Previewing The Tell-Tale Heart by Edgar Allan Poe Feature Menu.

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Presentation on theme: "Introducing the Selection Literary Focus: Narrator and Irony Reading Skills: Previewing The Tell-Tale Heart by Edgar Allan Poe Feature Menu."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Introducing the Selection Literary Focus: Narrator and Irony Reading Skills: Previewing The Tell-Tale Heart by Edgar Allan Poe Feature Menu

3 The Tell-Tale Heart by Edgar Allan Poe

4 What will he do? What did he do? Can you trust him to tell you? Every night at midnight he creeps into the old man’s room.

5 The Tell-Tale Heart by Edgar Allan Poe [End of Section] “True!—nervous— very, very dreadfully nervous I had been and am; but why will you say that I am mad?”

6 The Tell-Tale Heart Literary Focus: Narrator and Irony As you read “The Tell-Tale Heart,” you will be asked to figure out if the story’s narrator is reliable. The narrator is the person who is telling the story. Sometimes the narrator cannot be trusted to let us know what is really going on. ?

7 As you read “The Tell-Tale Heart,” you will also be asked to identify and appreciate irony in the story. The Tell-Tale Heart Literary Focus: Narrator and Irony Irony can be described as the difference between what you expect—or what the narrator tells you— and what is real. Listen to this excerpt again. What example of irony do you see already in what the narrator has told you?

8 As you read “The Tell-Tale Heart,” you will also be asked to identify and appreciate irony in the story. The Tell-Tale Heart Literary Focus: Narrator and Irony Irony can be described as the difference between what you expect—or what the narrator tells you— and what is real. The narrator claims that he is not mad, yet he says that he is hearing sounds that are not real. Most people consider this a symptom of madness.

9 The Tell-Tale Heart Literary Focus: Narrator and Irony There are three kinds of irony: Verbal irony We say just the opposite of what we mean. Situational irony What happens is different from what we expect. Dramatic ironyWe know something a character doesn’t know.

10 Verbal Irony Verbal irony occurs when there is a contrast between what is said or written and what is really meant. In speech, a person’s tone of voice helps us identify verbal irony. I’m so glad that I brought the sunscreen. © 2003 clipart.com

11 Situational Irony Situational irony occurs when a situation turns out to be the opposite of what we expect. © 2003 clipart.com

12 Dramatic Irony Dramatic irony occurs when the audience or reader knows something that the characters do not know. © 2003 clipart.com I’m picking up speed now!

13 The Tell-Tale Heart Reading Skills: Previewing As you read “The Tell-Tale Heart,” practice the strategy previewing. Follow these steps to preview a story. Look at the story’s title. What does it suggest about the story? Look at the illustrations. What do they tell you about the story’s characters, setting, and events? Guess what will happen in the story.

14 The Tell-Tale Heart Reading Skills: Previewing Follow these steps to preview “The Tell-Tale Heart.” Look at the illustrations. What do they tell you about the story’s characters, setting, and events?

15 The Tell-Tale Heart Reading Skills: Previewing Follow these steps to preview “The Tell-Tale Heart.” What do you think will happen in “The Tell-Tale Heart”? [End of Section]

16 The Tell-Tale Heart Make the Connection: Quickwrite Make the Connection: Quickwrite

17 The Tell-Tale Heart Make the Connection: Quickwrite Many people like a good scare now and then. Conduct a class poll to come up with a list of your top-ten terrors—choose details from scary TV shows, movies, books, and events. [End of Section]

18 The Tell-Tale Heart Preview the Vocabulary Vocabulary

19 The Tell-Tale Heart Preview the Vocabulary Some words in the story may be unfamiliar to you. Get to know these words before starting the story. vexed v.: disturbed. sagacity n.: intelligence and good judgement. refrained v.: held back. wary adj.: cautious. acute adj.: sharp.

20 The Tell-Tale Heart Preview the Vocabulary Some words in the story may be unfamiliar to you. Get to know these words before starting the story. audacity n.: boldness. vehemently adv.: forcefully. gestculations n.: energetic gestures. derision n.: ridicule. suavity n.: smooth manner.

21 The Tell-Tale Heart Preview the Vocabulary Replace each of the vocabulary words in orange with an easier synonym. Use the picture as a hint. 1.Foxhounds have been bred to possess an acute sense of smell. 2.The man on the phone seemed vexed by his conversation.

22 The Tell-Tale Heart Preview the Vocabulary Replace each of the vocabulary words in orange with an easier synonym. Use the picture as a hint. 3. Judge Taylor was well-known for his sagacity. 4.A stop sign on the side of the bus reminds drivers to refrain from passing it. 5.Dad became more wary as he drove past the third deer crossing sign.

23 The Tell-Tale Heart Preview the Vocabulary 7.“I can’t believe,” barked Ryan’s dad, “that you have the audacity to ask for money when the yard hasn’t been mowed in three weeks!” 6. The salesman’s suavity had earned him a hefty bonus—his customers always came back for more.

24 The Tell-Tale Heart Preview the Vocabulary 8.Suzanne argued vehemently that she was old enough to choose her own friends. 9.The umpire’s gesticulations left little doubt about the outcome of the play. 10. To Jared’s dismay, his announcement about entering the talent show was met with derision.

25 The Tell-Tale Heart Preview the Vocabulary Now check your answers. 1.acute: sharp 2.vexed: disturbed 3.sagacity: good judgment 4.refrain: hold back 5.wary: cautious 6.suavity: smooth manner 7.audacity: boldness 8.vehemently: forcefully 9.gesticulations: energetic gestures 10.derision: ridicule

26 The Tell-Tale Heart Meet the Writer Meet the Writer

27 The Tell-Tale Heart Meet the Writer Edgar Allan Poe was born in Boston in He was orphaned by age three and taken in by a foster family. Poe did not get along with his foster father, John Allan, and eventually Allan cut all ties with him. Poe died at the age of forty—a poor man but well- known for his tales of horror and mystery. More about the writer. [End of Section]

28 The End The Tell-Tale Heart by Edgar Allan Poe


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