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Design Specifications Design is directed toward human beings. To design is to solve human problems by identifying them and executing the best solution.

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Presentation on theme: "Design Specifications Design is directed toward human beings. To design is to solve human problems by identifying them and executing the best solution."— Presentation transcript:

1 Design Specifications Design is directed toward human beings. To design is to solve human problems by identifying them and executing the best solution. Ivan Chermayeff Ivan Chermayeff

2 Design Specifications Example Design Specification Design Specification Design Specification vs. Product (Technical) Specification Design Criteria Performance Product Size and Shape Aesthetics Materials Safety and legal Issues Ergonomics Environment Life Cycle Durability and Maintenance Measurable Values

3 Example Design Specification Design a pet restraint system to keep a dog safe.

4 Design Specification Specific, concise written information about the requirements that must be met in order to attain the intended outcome Design Specifications include: –Criteria –Constraints Must be specific and unambiguous Client must be involved

5 Design Specification vs. Product (Technical) Specification Design Specification: Precise and explicit information about the requirements for a successful solution to a problem Product (Technical) Specification: Explicit set of requirements that must be met in order for a product to operate as designed

6 Design Criteria The explicit requirements that a product must meet in order to be successful Used to evaluate a product’s potential to be successful Used to create testing procedures May address − Performance − Product Size and Shape − Aesthetics − Materials − Safety and Legal Issues − Ergonomics − Environment − Life Cycle − Maintenance − Customer Needs − Others

7 Specify the function of the product –What will the product need to do? Example: When designing a special fork lift for a warehouse, –How will the vehicle be powered? –What is the maximum speed? –On what surfaces must the vehicle operate? –What turning radius is required? –What are the dimensions of the cargo to be lifted? –What is the maximum load to be lifted? –How high must the cargo be lifted and stored? Performance ©iStockphoto.com

8 Product Size and Shape Form Dimensions Weight

9 Aesthetics The way that a product looks will affect marketability, especially for a consumer item. –Color –Surface Treatment –Shape –Material

10 Materials Often chosen by the design team to meet criteria, but sometimes dictated based on special needs or availability ©iStockphoto.com

11 Safety and Legal Issues Human health and safety Product liability laws expose manufacturers to lawsuits if their products fail ©iStockphoto.com

12 Ergonomics The science of designing according to human needs Products should be designed for human comfort, efficiency, safety, and ease of use

13 Operating Environment –Product will encounter a wide range of environments from manufacture to operation by the customer Temperature range Corrosive environments Dust or dirt Pressure and humidity Vibration and noise Degree of abuse Environment

14 Global Environment –What affect will the product have on the Earth’s environment? –How will the product be disposed of? Environment

15 Life Cycle Service Life: The length of time a product is expected to operate properly without need for repair Product Life: The length of time a product will undergo production before being replaced with a newer version Planned Obsolescence: A manufacturing decision by a company to make consumer products in such a way that they become out-of-date or useless within a known period.

16 Durability and Maintenance Product should not need major repairs within the service life Routine maintenance should be planned Routine maintenance should be easy –Plan for access –Necessary tools –Replacement parts

17 Design Specification – Design Constraints The limits on the design and production of a product –Resources (people, equipment, etc.) –Budget –Time –Energy –Materials –Manufacturing Process –Others

18 Measurable Values Each criteria and constraint should be expressed with specific or measurable value(s). –Evaluation of Conceptual Designs –Testing Criteria

19 Measurable Values Poor Specification: The device must warn the driver and slow the vehicle when the car is too close to an object. Better: Within one second the device must warn the vehicle driver and disengage the cruise control when the car attains a distance of less than 50 ft directly between itself and another vehicle.

20 Design Specifications Example Design Specification Design Specification Design Specification vs. Product (Technical) Specification Design Criteria Performance Product Size and Shape Aesthetics Materials Safety and legal Issues Ergonomics Environment Life Cycle Durability and Maintenance Measurable Values

21 Image Resources Microsoft, Inc. (n.d.). Clip art. Retrieved from iStockphoto. Retrieved from


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