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Determining the Mole Ratio in a Chemical Reaction Chemistry 117

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Presentation on theme: "Determining the Mole Ratio in a Chemical Reaction Chemistry 117"— Presentation transcript:

1 Determining the Mole Ratio in a Chemical Reaction Chemistry 117

2 Videos Stoichiometry and Limiting Reactants (8a & b): stry_player/

3 Limiting Reactant Limiting Reactant: the reactant that is completely consumed in a reaction. The available amount of it determines the maximum possible reaction yield. (Brown and Holme’s definition)

4 Limiting Reactant Example Example Limiting Reactant Calculation: (http://www.chem.tamu.edu/class/majors/tutorialnotefiles/limiting.htm) A 2.00 g sample of ammonia is mixed with 4.00 g of oxygen. Which is the limiting reactant and how much excess reactant remains after the reaction has stopped? First, we need to create a balanced equation for the reaction: 4 NH 3(g) + 5 O 2(g) 4 NO (g) + 6 H 2 O (g) Then we use stoichiometry to calculate how much product is produced by each reactant. The reactant that produces the lesser amount of product is the "limiting reactant.” (in this case is the oxygen)

5 Limiting Reactant Example Continued Example Limiting Reactant Calculation: (http://www.chem.tamu.edu/class/majors/tutorialnotefiles/limiting.htm) Next, to find the amount of excess reactant, we must calculate how much of the non-limiting reactant (ammonia) actually did react with the limiting reactant (oxygen). We're not finished yet though g is the amount of ammonia that reacted, not what is left over. To find the amount of excess reactant remaining, subtract the amount that reacted from the amount in the original sample


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