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Moche (Mochica) society north Peruvian coastal desert 100-800 CE Andean South America: Moche The number and size of key states and empires grew dramatically.

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Presentation on theme: "Moche (Mochica) society north Peruvian coastal desert 100-800 CE Andean South America: Moche The number and size of key states and empires grew dramatically."— Presentation transcript:

1 Moche (Mochica) society north Peruvian coastal desert CE Andean South America: Moche The number and size of key states and empires grew dramatically by imposing political unity on areas where previously there had been competing states. Required examples of key states and empires (Students should know the location and names):

2 Royal Textiles Developed a powerful elite and specialized craft production instituted labor tribute* payments. new technologies in metallurgy, pottery, and textile production, Concept 2.2, III C. Imperial societies relied on a range of methods to maintain the production of food and provide rewards for the loyalty of the elites. Teach one illustrative example of such methods, either from the list below or an example of your choice: Corvee Slavery Rents and tributes Peasant communities Family and household production

3 Teotihuacán The number and size of key states and empires grew dramatically by imposing political unity on areas where previously there had been competing states. Required examples of key states and empires (Student should know the location and names):,... Mesoamerica: Teotihuacan, Maya city-states Cities served as centers of trade, public performance of religious rituals, and political administration for states and empires. Teach one illustrative example of cities, either from the list below or an example of your choice: Persepolis, Chang’an Pataliputra Athens Carthage Rome Alexandria Constantinople Teotihuacan

4 Started building approx 100 BCE; lasted until sometime between the 7th and 8th centuries CE. At its zenith, Teotihuacan largest city in the pre-Columbian Americas. more than 200,000inhabitants multi-floor apartment compounds One of the largest cities of the world

5 Mayan How about: Oh crap those messy Mayans

6 City-__________ of Mayan Civilization

7 The ruins of Palenque. Classical era : CE Codex (Books) The _______

8 Mayan Technology’s role in state building Most lands occupied by the Maya were poorly drained lowlands with poor soil. To improve agricultural production, the Maya constructed terraces, which trapped silt carried by rivers and so retained rich earth for planting, thereby allowing their expansion and population growth.

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10 Corvée unfree and unpaid labor imposed by the state for work on public projects or by a landlord Early form of taxation differs from chattel slavery in that the worker is not owned outright and the work is usually intermittent; typically only a certain number of days' or months' work is required each year. Used by Imperial China, in the Egyptian Old Kingdom (ca 2613 BCE) for construction projects such as pyramids, temples, quarries, canals, roads, and in the Late Roman Empire the citizens performed opera publica in lieu of paying taxes in goods; often it consisted of road and bridge work. Concept 2.2, III C. Imperial societies relied on a range of methods to maintain the production of food and provide rewards for the loyalty of the elites. Teach one illustrative example of such methods, either from the list below or an example of your choice: Corvee Slavery Rents and tributes Peasant communities Family and household production

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12 Slavery in China Slaves (nuli 奴隸 ) comprised roughly 1% of the population, a proportion far less than the contemporary Greco-Roman world which relied on the labor of a large slave population. Slaves were classified into two categories: those who were privately owned, and those who were owned by the state

13 Persia basis of agriculture was the labor of free farmers and tenants and in handicrafts the labor of free artisans Small number of slaves from conquered populations Satrapies collected tribute

14 The number and size of key states and empires grew dramatically by imposing political unity on areas where previously there had been competing states. Required examples of key states and empires (Student should know the location and names):,... Mediterranean region: Phoenicia and its colonies, Greek city-states and colonies, and Hellenistic and Roman Empires

15 Hellenistic Era: Time period where Greek (and then Roman) culture spread and blended with civilizations conquered by__________ the __________.

16 Greco-Buddhism, cultural syncretism between Hellenistic culture and Buddhism, developed between the 4th century BCE and the 5th century CE cultural consequence of a long chain of interactions begun by Greek forays into India from the time of Alexander the Great, carried further by the establishment of Indo-Greek rule in the area for some centuries, and extended during flourishing of the Hellenized empire of the Kushans. The convergence of Greco-Roman culture and Buddhist beliefs affected the development of unique sculptural developments.

17 The Buddha, in Greco-Buddhist style, 1st-2nd century CE, Gandhara (Modern Pakistan). (Standing Buddha (Tokyo National Museum)).

18 Major Developments: 200 CE to 600 CE Collapse of empire; Han china, western portion of Roman empire, Gupta Collapse of empire was more severe in _______ Europe than it was in the ________Med or China

19 SIMILARITIES Several common factors caused H, R and G empires to fall:  Attacks from ___________ or migratory groups Their migration was probably caused by drought and lack of pasture, and the invention and use of the s__________facilitated their attacks on all three established civilizations.  Deterioration of political institutions - All three empires were riddled by political ___________during their latter days, and all three suffered under weak-willed rulers. Moral decay also characterized the years prior to their respective falls.  Protection/maintenance of __________- which had grown so large that their military had trouble guarding them. A primary example is the failure of the Great Wall to keep the Huns out of China. The Huns generally just went around it.  __________that followed the trade routes - Plagues and epidemics may have killed off as much as half of the population of each empire. COMMON CONSEQUENCES ____________was disrupted but survived, keeping intact the trend toward increased long-distance contact. Trade on the ________ _________even increased as conflict and decline of political authority affected overland trade. (ooh ccot pt) The importance of ____________increased as political authority decreased. In the west religion, particularly______, developed authority in many areas of people's lives. ________also spread quickly in China, presenting itself as competition to Confucian traditions.

20 DIFFERENCES in the effect of the fall The fall of the Gupta probably had the least impact, partly because political unity wasn't the rule anyway, and partly because the traditions of _________ and the ________system continued on after the empire fell. The fall of the Han Dynasty –takes several 100 years before next dynasty—but tho discredited, __________traditions continued to give coherence to Chinese society. Nomads (as usual) adopted Ch ways The most devastating fall of all occurred in the _______ part of the Roman Empire. Roman civilization depended almost exclusively on the ability of the government and the military to control territory. Even though __________emerged as a major religion, it appeared so late in the life of the empire that it provided little to unify people as Romans after the empire fell. Instead, the areas of the empire fragmented into small parts and developed unique characteristics, and the Western Roman Empire never united again.

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23 Spread of __________

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25 "[Sugar cane] was brought to the [Indian] subcontinent during the B.C.E., era but it was not until the Gupta period that someone in India discovered how to reduce the juice of the sugar cane into crystallized sugar and thereby began an industry that has played a significant role in history for more than a millennium." -Asia in Western and World History, by Ainslie T. Embree & Carol Gluck Gupta Golden Age

26 records of knowledge of sugar among the ancient Greeks and Romans, but only as an imported medicine, and not as a food. For example Dioscorides in Greek in the 1st century (AD) wrote: "There is a kind of coalesced honey called sugar found in reeds in India and Arabia Felix [Yemen], similar in consistency to salt and brittle enough to be broken between the teeth like salt. It is good dissolved in water for the intestines and stomach, and taken as a drink to help a painful bladder and kidneys."DioscoridesArabia Felix

27 Key Concept 2.3 Emergence of Transregional Networks of Communication and Exchange With the organization of large-scale empires, the volume of long-distance trade _________ dramatically. Much of this trade resulted from the demand for raw materials and l________ goods. Land and water routes linked many regions of the E_________Hemisphere, while somewhat later separate networks connected the peoples and societies of the Americas. Exchanges of people, technology, religious and cultural beliefs, food crops, domesticated animals and disease pathogens developed alongside the trade in goods across far-flung networks of communication and exchange.

28 I. Land and water routes became the basis for transregional trade, communication and exchange networks in the Eastern Hemisphere, while somewhat later separate networks connected the peoples and societies of the Americas. NOTE: Students should know how factors including the climate and location of the routes, the typical trade goods, and the ethnicity of people involved shaped the distinctive features of the following trade routes. A. Eurasian ________Roads B. Trans-Saharan c_________routes C. Indian Ocean sea lanes D. Mediterranean sea lanes Check out that chart....

29 The earliest evidence for domesticated ________ in the region about 7 th cent BCE; late centuries BCE special camel _________ developed. Used by the B_______ people, they enabled more regular contact across the entire width of the Sahara. By 300s CE camels repalce donkey and horse. But... it was not until the 7 th and 8 th centuries, with the conversion of West Africa to I_______ that routes became regular. --- ooh CCOT point

30 Trade on what sea lanes? By whom????? Mare Nostrum

31 Who participated: Chinese, Indians, Malays, Persians, Arabs, East Africans Created a trading class with _________of cultures Imp of ___________; use of ________ sails

32 II. New technologies facilitated long-distance communication and exchange. A. New technologies (such as yokes, saddles or stirrups) permitted the use of domesticated pack animals (such as horses, o______, l_______ or ca_______) to transport goods across longer routes. B. Innovations in maritime technologies (such as the l________sail or d_______ ships) as well as advanced knowledge of the ___________ winds stimulated exchanges along maritime routes from East Africa to East Asia.

33 III. Alongside the trade in goods, exchanges of people, technology, religious and cultural beliefs, food crops, domesticated animals and disease pathogens developed across far-flung networks of communication and exchange. A. The spread of crops, including rice and cotton from South Asia to the Middle East, encouraged changes in farming and irrigation techniques (such as the development of the q________t system in Persia). B. The spread of disease pathogens diminished urban populations and contributed to the decline of some empires (such as Rome or China) C. Religious and cultural traditions were transformed as they spread including Chinese culture, Christianity, Hinduism and Buddhism. AKA great vehicle bodhisattvas, revere e Buddha influence in China and Japan

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35 _________MIGRATIONS Originated in a region that is now modern Nigeria and Cameroon. By about 3000 BCE they were slowing spreading south and after 2000 BCE their movements increased so that by about 1000 CE Bantu speaking peoples occupied most of Africa south of the equator. Incremental process Spread____, knowledge of _______ and eventually, _________technology.

36 Austronesian-speaking peoples whose superior _______technology led them to establish settlements throughout the islands of the _________ Ocean. Their migrations spread _________ and a_______knowledge as well as crops. Their descendants built strong hierarchical chiefdoms, especially on large islands with relatively dense populations such as Hawaii, Tonga and Samoa. Polynesian ___________

37 Series of tribes from southern Russia, who, over a period of millennia, embarked on a serious of immigrations from India through western Europe; their greatest legacy was the broad distribution of Indo- European ____________ through much of Eurasia. _________________________ Migrations

38 Hsiung-nu—pastoral nomads originate in the ________ lived in areas that sedentary agriculture could not cuz not enuf rain, incursions into China, Gupta and Rome, played major role in rise and fall of empires in civilized cores—courage culture, kin-related bands, honor, vendettas, men dominate, short legged horses, some social stratification

39 Where? New technologies permitted the use of domesticated pack animals to transport goods across longer routes. Teach one illustrative example of new technologies, either from the list below or an example of your choice: Yokes Saddles Stirrups Teach one illustrative example of domesticated pack animals, either from the list below or an example of your choice: Horses Oxen Llamas Camels

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41 Horses in warfare The __________ which gives greater stability to a rider, has been described as one of the most significant inventions in the history of warfare, prior to gunpowder. As a tool allowing expanded use of horses in warfare, the stirrup is often called the third revolutionary step in equipment, after the chariot and the saddle. The invention of the stirrup occurred relatively late in history, considering that horses were domesticated in approximately 4500 BC, and the earliest forms of the saddle—a simple blanket with light padding and a surcingle appeared about 800 BC. Chariots and archers were weapons of war in Ancient Egypt.

42 The Horse: a weapon In most civilizations the horse was used more in chariots than for riding until about 800 BC. Before stirrups most equestrian cultures used no support for the feet at all. There are records of a loose surcingle being employed behind the girth, into which the feet could be tucked. Toe stirrups (loops of rope which held the big toe) were first recorded in Northern India in the 2nd century BC, their use was somewhat limited by climate and footwear. The first stirrups designed to take the entire foot were probably single mounting stirrups recorded in China in the 4th Century AD. The mounting stirrup was easier than using a stool to mount and safer than vaulting on when fully armed (Cambyses, king of Persia stabbed himself while mounting when fully armed in 522 BC - A.D.H.Bivar, "The Stirrup and Its Origins." Oriental Arts, n.s. 1 (1955): )

43 A rider supported by stirrups was less likely to fall off while fighting, and could deliver a blow with a weapon that more fully employed the weight and momentum of horse and rider. Among other advantages, stirrups provided greater balance and support to the rider, which allowed a mounted soldier (part of the cavalry) to use a sword more efficiently without falling, especially against infantry adversaries. The earliest manifestation of the stirrup was a toe loop that held the big toe and was used in India, possibly as early as 500 BC.This ancient foot support consisted of a looped rope for the big toe which was at the bottom of a saddle made of fibre or leather. Such a configuration was suitable for the warm climate of south and central India where people used to ride horses barefootsouth Depiction of a Kushan divinity using an early platform- style stirrup, circa AD 150. British Museum.KushanBritish Museum Real first stirrup was Kush—about 100 CE— founded by white Huns Appears in China in widespread use 400s

44 Trans Saharan Trade gold, ivory trade, and salt sent north and east to population centers in North Africa, the Middle East and Europe in exchange for glassware, cloth, ceramics etc Although there are Classical references to direct travel from the Mediterranean to West Africa most of this trade was conducted through nomads (middlemen), inhabiting the area and aware of passages through the

45 First mention of camels across _______comes in 46 bce, probably from Arabian peninsula by way of Egypt

46 Trans Saharan Trade and Carth age Carthage founded c. 800 BCE, one terminus for West African gold, ivory, and salt. Even after fall of Carthaginian Empire Trade continued into Roman times.

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49 Add east weast point from ap curriculum Innovations in maritime technologies, as well as advanced knowledge of the monsoon winds, stimulated exchanges along maritime routes from East Africa to East Asia. Teach one illustrative example of innovations in maritime technologies, either from the list below or an example of your choice: Lateen sail Dhow ships

50 The M editerranean runs east-west, and so there is little variation in its ecology. Some bits are wetter and some drier, but mostly it’s all “Mediterranean.” By contrast, the Indian Ocean includes environments as varied as tropical East Africa, the deserts that border the Red Sea and Persian Gulf, the intensely wet areas of southern India, and the tropical rainforests of Southeast Asia. This ecological variety served as a stimulus to trade. The Persian Gulf had little in the way of timber, but the teak forests of India and the mangrove swamps of East Africa were only a month away by ship. Horses do not thrive in southern India, but they were needed for military purposes. Arabian horses were exported by ship to the ports of southern India to meet this need. Spices and incenses grew only in a few favored places. P_______was grown throughout southern India, but some of the more valuable spices like nutmeg and cloves were produced in a few little islands in Southeast_______. Frankincense comes from a few places in South Arabia and the Horn of Africa. These goods, however, were desired throughout the Indian Ocean and beyond.

51 The ecological diversity of the region is paralleled by its human diversity. Because of its size, the Indian Ocean connects several regions of Africa, Southwest Asia, South Asia, Southeast Asia, and, to a degree, East Asia. People in these places eat different foods, dress differently, talk differently, build their houses differently, and perhaps most tellingly build their boats differently. Despite their differences, these regions and the people in them were, for most of their history, in regular and intimate contact with each other. What the

52 Trade in the Med First, Phoenicians Then Greeks Carthage and Romans

53 Long banks of oars propelled the Roman warship swiftly through the water and into battle. Roman cargo ships featured the same distinctive square sails, but warships often had additional protective coverings to shield them from fire and missiles.

54 Teach one illustrative example of cities, either from the list below or an example of your choice: Persepolis, Chang’an Pataliputra Athens Carthage Rome Alexandria Constantinople Teotihuacan

55 Teach one illustrative example of cities, either from the list below or an example of your choice: Persepolis (8), Chang’an (7) Pataliputra(6) Athens (3) Carthage (2) Rome (4) Alexandria (5) Constantinople (9) Teotihuacan (1) 5

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57 First Persian Empire Achemenids – founded by Cyrus the Great (r BCE) created largest known empire

58 CLASSICAL CHINA Qin Dynasty BCE Han Dynasty 202 BCE to 220 CE The Location...

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60 Jewish Diasporic Communities Definition: dispersion of Jews outside of Israel from the sixth century B.CE, when they were exiled to Babylonia, until the present time. Psalm 137 By the rivers of Babylon, there we sat, sat and wept, as we thought of Zion. There on the willows we hung up our lyres, for our captors asked us there for songs, our tormentors, for amusement, "Sing us one of the songs of Zion." How can we sing a song of the Lord on alien soil? If I forget you, O Jerusalem, let my right hand wither; let my tongue stick to my palate if I cease to think of you, if I do not keep Jerusalem in memory even at my happiest hour. Remember, O Lord, against the Edomites the day of Jerusalem's fall; how they cried, "Strip her, strip her to her very foundations!" Fair Babylon, you predator, a blessing on him who repays you in kind what you have inflicted on us; a blessing on him who seizes your babies and dashes them against the rocks.

61 ________’s Missionary Activities The Spread of Christianity during A.D


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