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NOTES – 10-1-13. Changes in slavery….  In the 15 th century the primary market for African slaves was Southwest Asia, where they were primarily used.

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Presentation on theme: "NOTES – 10-1-13. Changes in slavery….  In the 15 th century the primary market for African slaves was Southwest Asia, where they were primarily used."— Presentation transcript:

1 NOTES –

2 Changes in slavery….  In the 15 th century the primary market for African slaves was Southwest Asia, where they were primarily used as domestic servants.  Some European countries also had slaves, used as servants for wealthy families.  The demand for slaves rose dramatically with the European voyages to the Americas and the planting of sugar cane there.

3  Plantations, large agricultural estates, were set up on the eastern coast of Brazil and on the islands in the Caribbean to grow sugar cane.  Growing cane is labor intensive.  The small native population, much of which had died from European diseases, could not provide the labor. African slaves were imported to meet the need.

4 Activity 1

5 The First African slaves in the Americas….  A Spanish ship carried the first boatload of African slaves to the Americas in  The trade grew tremendously in the next two centuries, becoming part of the New World economy’s triangular trade.

6 The Triangular Trade Route  This pattern of triangular trade connected Europe, Africa, and the Americas.  European merchants carried finished goods (such as guns and cloth) to Africa, where they traded for slaves.  The slaves were shipped to and sold in the Americas.  European merchants then bought tobacco, molasses, sugar, and cotton (raw materials) and shipped them back to Europe.

7 Raw Materials

8 ACTIVITY 2…  Describe the purpose and path of the triangular trade.  Color code route directions on the map in your notes and label the arrows: “slaves”, “manufactured goods”, and “raw materials”.

9 Activity 3… Wood Cloth Iron Molasses Grain Slaves Sugarcane Rum Gunpowder Tools Furs Tobacco Guns

10 Wood Molasses Grain Sugarcane Furs Tobacco Slaves Cloth Rum Gunpowder Tools Guns Iron Europe to Africa (finished goods) Africa to the Americas Americas to Europe (raw materials)

11 How many slaves?  An estimated 275,000 African slaves were exported during the 16 th century.  Over a million were shipped in the 17 th century and 6 million in the 18 th century.  Up to 10 million slaves in all were shipped from Africa to the Americas.

12 Why so many?  One reason for the high numbers was the death rate.  Many slaves died on the Middle Passage, the journey to the Americas that was the middle leg of the triangular trade route. QUICK RESPONSE – Describe how you would feel if you were all of a sudden captured, forced to stay tightly packed on a boat for months at a time?

13  Many of those who survived died of diseases after arriving.  Since succeeding generations developed immunities, death rates were higher for newly arrived slaves than for those who were born and raised in the Americas.

14 Who became slaves?  Before the Europeans entered the scene, most slaves in Africa were war captives. Europeans bought slaves from African merchants in return for guns, gold, and other European goods.  As the demand for slaves grew, African merchants turned to non-prisoners of war to supply the slave trade.

15 Impact on African societies…  Some local rulers became concerned about the impact of the slave trade on their societies.  In a letter to the king of Portugal in 1526, King Afonso of Congo said, “So great is the corruption that our country is being completely depopulated.”  These protests were ignored, and many other local rulers profited from the slave trade.

16  The slave trade depopulated areas, deprived many African communities of their youngest and strongest men and women, and increased local warfare as different traders and rulers competed with each other and raided neighbors for slaves.

17  Some African states, such as the brilliant and creative Benin, were devastated by the slave trade.  As their populations declined and warfare increased, the people lost faith in their gods, their art deteriorated, and human sacrifice increased.  Benin became brutal and corrupt.  Later, it took years to discover the brilliance of the earlier culture destroyed by slavery.


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