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“I am naturally anti-slavery. If slavery is not wrong, nothing is wrong. I cannot remember when I did not so think and feel.” --Abraham Lincoln ( from.

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Presentation on theme: "“I am naturally anti-slavery. If slavery is not wrong, nothing is wrong. I cannot remember when I did not so think and feel.” --Abraham Lincoln ( from."— Presentation transcript:

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2 “I am naturally anti-slavery. If slavery is not wrong, nothing is wrong. I cannot remember when I did not so think and feel.” --Abraham Lincoln ( from a letter to A G. Hodges, April 4, 1864, Complete Works of Abraham Lincoln, Nicolay and Hay) 1

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4 Crossing the Ohio River from Louisville, Kentucky, to New Albany, Indiana, was a route of freedom for slaves. 3

5 The red line on the map shows a path from Louisville, Kentucky, north across the Ohio River to New Albany, Indiana. New Albany is the county seat of Floyd County which stretches for 13 miles directly across the Ohio River from Louisville. 4

6 Historical Markers in New Albany 5

7 What Was Slavery Like? According to information by the National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom Program: What Was Slavery Like? The National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom Program gives the following information: “The common thread binding all slaves was the fact that they had no legal rights. Slaves were considered property which could be bought and sold at anytime. Slaves could not own property. By law, it was illegal to teach a slave to read and write. Slaves could not legally marry. Slaves had no rights over their children. Slaves could not worship as they chose. Slaves could not come and go as they chose to do so. The Underground Railroad provided the means by which the slave could reach his/her dream of freedom and all the possibilities that came with it.” l 6

8 The Carnegie Center for Art and History in New Albany features a permanent exhibit documenting the critical role New Albany played in the Underground Railroad. 7

9 New Albany resident, Pamela Peters, has been intrigued with the Underground Railroad since girlhood. During extensive research into primary sources she uncovered proof of the Underground Railroad in the area. Her book, The Underground Railroad in Floyd County, Indiana, led to a permanent exhibit at Carnegie Center. 8

10 Introduction to the Exhibit 9

11 Kentucky was a slave-holding state while Indiana was a free state. Many citizens from New Albany and southern Indiana helped Kentucky slaves gain freedom. Primary sources such as letters, diaries, court testimony records, artifacts, newspaper articles and runaway slave ads are shown in the exhibit. 10

12 Henson McIntosh and his wife are listed in the New Albany Black Register. Henson was a skilled rope maker and was arrested for helping a slave escape. He was imprisoned at Frankfort, Kentucky, for a total of seven years for his role in the Underground Railroad. 11

13 When Sarah Lucas applied for freedom papers, she testified she was born to free black parents in Ohio. She was arrested for helping a runaway slave escape and served confinement for six months. 12

14 Louis Hartman’s words reveal the frequent willingness of citizens to help runaway slaves. 13

15 Lucy Bishop was the wife of John Bishop, pastor of Second Presbyterian Church in New Albany from Lucy and other women in the church brought concealed food to the church to feed slaves escaping across the nearby Ohio River. 14

16 Second Presbyterian Church was built in near the Ohio River in New Albany. Since 1898 the church has been owned by Baptists and was renamed Second Baptist Church. 15

17 Kathy Wilkerson, a member of the church, tells about its role in the Underground Railroad providing a secondary source of information. Her family’s history in the church can be traced for four generations. 16

18 Safety signals were given from the back of the church to slaves escaping from Louisville across the Ohio River. 17

19 Slaves were hidden in the church’s basement. Food was brought to them by church members like Lucy Bishop. An underground tunnel can still be seen. 18

20 Unknown Heroes (A Tribute in Carnegie Center) “Just as each slave story is unique, so are the stories of those people who aided slaves in their escape to freedom. Whether they were moved to action from a deep moral conviction that slavery was wrong, or they simply responded in an instant when a suffering human asked for their help, all who participated in the Underground Railroad were heroes and the history of New Albany is richer for their actions.” 19

21 Want To Learn More? What primary and secondary sources could you use to deepen your understanding about a topic of interest to you? Does evidence of the Underground Railroad exist in your community? How can you find out? Read and research other stories about the Underground Railroad. Share information with classmates. NOTE: School librarians may request a copy of the interactive DVD about the Underground Railroad shown at Carnegie Center by sending a request on school stationary with $10.00 to: The Carnegie Center for Art and History 201 East Spring Street New Albany, Indiana

22 SOURCES Brochure and Tour Guide compliments of Carnegie Center for Art and History in New Albany, Indiana Photographs by Mary Louise Majors (National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom) 21

23 Created by Mary Louise Majors Participant, Lincoln Tri-State Summer Institute and Life-long Learner 22


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