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The Economics of Ending Slavery Year 9. It’s the Economy Stupid… "It's the economy, stupid" was a phrase in American politics widely used during Bill.

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Presentation on theme: "The Economics of Ending Slavery Year 9. It’s the Economy Stupid… "It's the economy, stupid" was a phrase in American politics widely used during Bill."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Economics of Ending Slavery Year 9

2

3 It’s the Economy Stupid… "It's the economy, stupid" was a phrase in American politics widely used during Bill Clinton's successful 1992 presidential campaign against George H.W. Bush.

4 Adam Smith Smith believed that when an individual pursues his self- interest, he indirectly promotes the good of society: "by pursuing his own interest, [the individual] frequently promotes that of the society more effectually than when he intends to promote it."

5 Source 7 ‘The experience of all ages and nations, I believe, demonstrates that the work done by the slaves, though it appears to cost only their maintenance, is in the end the dearest of any. A person who can acquire no property can have no interest but to eat as much and to labour as little as possible. Whatever work he does can be squeezed out of him by violence alone’ ‘The experience of all ages and nations, I believe, demonstrates that the work done by the slaves, though it appears to cost only their maintenance, is in the end the dearest of any. A person who can acquire no property can have no interest but to eat as much and to labour as little as possible. Whatever work he does can be squeezed out of him by violence alone’

6 Task What do you think Adam Smith means in source 7? Why do you think the slave traders and merchant ship owners would have taken notice? What do you think Adam Smith means in source 7? Why do you think the slave traders and merchant ship owners would have taken notice? You are to make a chart like the following and try and list as many factors as you can as to why slavery was abolished You are to make a chart like the following and try and list as many factors as you can as to why slavery was abolished

7 1562 The slave trade unofficially begins. Trade and naval commander Captain John Hawkins was on his way to West Africa. He captured quite a few people and sold them in the Caribbean as slaves Slave trade officially begins. First ship full of Africans bought as slaves arrives in Virginia Britain leads the way. Britain becomes one of the leading slave trade nations Eight in every 10 people living in the Caribbean are African slaves Britain is the biggest slave trading country. From 1690 to 1807, 2.8 million slaves were moved Bristol is the biggest slave port in England. There are 37 journeys made every year Slave trade campaigner William Wilberforce is born in Hull First and biggest protest against the slave trade. A slave called Tacky led a protest against the treatment of slaves on sugar plantations. Hundreds of slaves attacked the plantations setting crops and sugar alight. In the end Tacky was captured and beheaded Slave case goes to court. Slave James Somerset escaped from his owner in London. He was caught, but with the help of campaigner Granville Sharp the case went to court and he was freed. Many people thought this meant slavery was outlawed in Britain. Of course, they were mistaken Group called Abolition of the Slave trade formed This group did all it could to try and put an end to the slave trade. Two key members were Granville Sharp and John Clarkson A law comes into place restricting the number of slaves on a ship. The Slave Abolition Society also organises the first petition campaign and there's the first investigation into the slave trade The British Government agrees in principle that slave trade should end The end of the slave trade. Anyone found transporting slaves was fined £100 - a lot of money at the time - for every slave.

8 1808 The British West Africa Squadron is established at Sierra Leone to suppress any illegal slave trading by British citizens. Between , nearly 150,000 people are freed by anti-slavery squadrons Britain negotiates with Portugal for the abolition of the South Atlantic slave trade End of the Napoleonic Wars. At the Congress of Vienna Britain puts pressure on France, the Netherlands, Portugal and Spain to abolish slave trade Bussa’s slave rebellion in Barbados, inspired by the Haitian revolution, causes huge damage in the harvest season before being brutally crushed Spain signs a treaty with England agreeing to end the Spanish slave trade north of the equator immediately, and south of the equator in Slave Registration Act forces all slave owners to provide a list of all the enslaved people they own every two years US law makes slave trading a crime equal to piracy, punishable by death Black actor Billy Waters dies penniless in the St Giles workhouse Slave rising in Demerara is brutally suppressed by British forces: 250 enslaved people die, and Rev John Smith of the London Missionary Society is sentenced to death for his part, causing outrage in Britain Anti-Slavery Committee formed in London to campaign for total abolition of slavery Major slave revolt called 'The Baptists’ War’ breaks out in Jamaica, led by Baptist preacher Sam Sharpe, and is brutally suppressed Nat Turner leads a slave rebellion in the US The History of Mary Prince is published in London and becomes an important part of the anti-slavery literature The Great Reform Act introduces new Members of Parliament from groups who are more likely to oppose slavery Abolition of Slavery Act – Britain abolishes slavery and provides for the emancipation of enslaved people in the British West Indies, to take effect in August The Act declares that the former enslaved people must serve a period of apprenticeship before receiving full emancipation. Originally this period was set at six years, but it was later reduced to four William Wilberforce dies on 29 July, three days after the bill to emancipate enslaved people is passed

9 Source Work Read Sources 1, 2 and 3 on your sheets Read Sources 1, 2 and 3 on your sheets For each one answer the following question – ‘What is this source trying to say?’ For each one answer the following question – ‘What is this source trying to say?’ Try and be as descriptive as possible as well as using prior historical experience Try and be as descriptive as possible as well as using prior historical experience

10 White Factors Black Factors Economic Factors

11 Which factor do you think was most significant to the abolishing of slavery? You must assess the pro’s and con’s of each argument – you may choose to do this in bullet point (I am looking for at least 3 reasons for each pro and at least one reason for the con’s You must assess the pro’s and con’s of each argument – you may choose to do this in bullet point (I am looking for at least 3 reasons for each pro and at least one reason for the con’s You then must come to some sort of conclusion on what factor you think was most significant You then must come to some sort of conclusion on what factor you think was most significant


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