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LANDSCAPE PAINTING (Romanticism) Figure 30-23 JOSEPH MALLORD WILLIAM TURNER, The Slave Ship (Slavers Throwing Overboard the Dead and Dying, Typhoon Coming.

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Presentation on theme: "LANDSCAPE PAINTING (Romanticism) Figure 30-23 JOSEPH MALLORD WILLIAM TURNER, The Slave Ship (Slavers Throwing Overboard the Dead and Dying, Typhoon Coming."— Presentation transcript:

1 LANDSCAPE PAINTING (Romanticism) Figure JOSEPH MALLORD WILLIAM TURNER, The Slave Ship (Slavers Throwing Overboard the Dead and Dying, Typhoon Coming On), Oil on canvas, Used landscapes as an allegory. Nature as symbolic, spiritual, moral and historical. Hudson River School Manifest Destiny -19 th century view that westward expansion across the continent was a logical destiny of the United States.

2 Albert BierstadtAmong the Sierra Nevada Mountains1868 THOMAS COLE, The Oxbow (View from Mount Holyoke, How do these two paintings represent Manifest Destiny?

3 ID these 2 artists. Contrast these two English paintings.

4 Frederic ChurchTwilight in the Wilderness1860’s JOHN CONSTABLE, The Haywain, Oil on canvas How do these two paintings ignore contemporary societal issues? Why?

5 Thomas Cole The Oxbow 1836

6 Figure THOMAS COLE, The Oxbow (View from Mount Holyoke, Northampton, Massachusetts, after a Thunderstorm), Oil on canvas, 4’ 3 1/2” x 6’ 4”. Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (gift of Mrs. Russell Sage, 1908). THE HUDSON RIVER SCHOOL: a specialty group of American landscape artists who painted scenes from the undeveloped regions of the Hudson River Valley-New York State; their focus was on the uncultivated regions of the area and identifying those qualities that made America unique. Cole addresses this question in this composition dividing it into 2-dark and stormy wilderness on the left and more developed civilization on the right. There’s a tiny representation of an artist in the bottom center, turns to viewer to ask the country’s fate. 6

7 Painting is divided into two sections Photo taken at the Met

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11 Figure JOSEPH MALLORD WILLIAM TURNER, The Slave Ship (Slavers Throwing Overboard the Dead and Dying, Typhoon Coming On), Oil on canvas, 2’ 11 11/16” x 4’ 5/16”. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (Henry Lillie Pierce Fund). The Slave Ship is his most notable work based on a popular book titled, The History of the Abolition of the Slave Trade (Thomas Clarkson). The captured moment tell the story of the ship’s captain upon learning that his insurance company will only reimburse him for dead slaves, has the sick and dying ones thrown overboard. uses emotion power of pure color ENGLISH 11

12 Figure JOHN CONSTABLE, The Haywain, Oil on canvas, 4’ 3” x 6’ 2”. National Gallery, London. “Painting is but another word for feeling” wrote Constable; this painting reflects his memories of a disappearing rural pastoralism. The Haywain is significant for what it does not show-the civil unrest of the agrarian working class and the outbreaks of violence and arson that resulted. ENGLISH

13 Figure CASPAR DAVID FRIEDRICH, Abbey in the Oak Forest, Oil on canvas, 3' 7 1/2" X 5' 7 1/4". Nationalgalerie, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Berlin. Caspar Friedrich was a master of the Romantic transcendental landscape; Symbols of death are everywhere from the funerary procession to the season’s desolation, leaning crosses and tombstones, skeletal trees, black clothing and destruction of the church. GERMAN

14 Figure FREDERIC EDWIN CHURCH, Twilight In the Wilderness, 1860s. Oil on canvas, 3’ 4” x 5’ 4”. Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland (Mr. and Mrs. William H. Marlatt Fund, ). Painted during the Civil War this painting shows not a single sign of humanity let along conflict. Church eloquently expresses the Romantic notion of the sublime presenting an idealistic view of America free of conflict. Landscape painting was extremely popular during both the late 18 th and early 19 th c and was the perfect vehicle for both artists and viewers to “naturalize” conditions, making any contentious issues silent and eliminating any hint of unrest. USA

15 Figure ALBERT BIERSTADT, Among the Sierra Nevada Mountains, California, Oil on canvas, 6’ x 10’. National Museum of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. Bierstadt’s 10 ft. panoramic landscape presents amazing natural beauty of the American West; His paintings reinforce the 19 th c doctrine of Manifest Destiny which justified western expansion. Bierstadt was also one of the Hudson River artists who used landscape genre as an allegorical vehicle to address moral and spiritual concerns. This popular 19 th c doctrine held that westward expansion across the continent was the logical destiny of the US. USA 15


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