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A Teaching Practice that helps students achieve Academic and Cultural Excellence! Culturally Relevant Teaching:

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Presentation on theme: "A Teaching Practice that helps students achieve Academic and Cultural Excellence! Culturally Relevant Teaching:"— Presentation transcript:

1 A Teaching Practice that helps students achieve Academic and Cultural Excellence! Culturally Relevant Teaching:

2 Focusing on Teaching Minority and Economically Disadvantaged Students

3 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 3 DRUGGED BY MY PARENTS...

4 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 4 Why Are we Here? We are here because we have a strong personality and passion for working to improve education. We believe in Educating ALL: students, parents, teachers, the community, and school leaders. We continue to worked to bridge the gap among and between parents and the schools.

5 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 5 Why are we here? We are committed to a quality and equitable education for all. We are here because students’ needs come first. “We are not here to make ourselves look good. We know we have work to do and many students to reach. “It is not about you, it is not about me, it is all about the students!”

6 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 6 Today’s Purpose To help teachers and others to successfully work with All students in a manner that is fair, equitable, respectful and rewarding

7 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 7

8 8 Econ. Dis. 4-5 Classroom Regular Ed EC 3-4 ESL 1-2 AIG 2 Close the Gap! Typical Heterogeneous Classroom

9 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 9 What is shared here today is important to ALL students learning, but essential for working with minority and economically disadvantaged students!

10 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 10 “ Education, like electricity, needs a conduit, a teacher, through which to transmit its power….” Rev. Jesse Jackson

11 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 11 Group Activity Each participant should have 5 small cards with numbers 1-5. As a question is asked each participant will choose a card to identify where they fit on the knowledge line. After identifying where they fall ask participants to stand for each number called out. All participants are asked to look around the room and reflect on the results.

12 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 12 Destructiveness Causes intentional harm Incapacity Causes unintentional harm Evasiveness (denial) “I don’t see differences” Pre-competence Seeks to learn about self and others Competence Actions consistently reflect stated values Proficiency Advocates for change Cultural Competence Continuum

13 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 13 Cultural Competence

14 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 14 What does it mean to be white? Race identity is like oxygen: It’s taken for granted when plentiful and frighteningly apparent when deprived. White people are taught that our lives are morally neutral, average, and ideal (D.W. Sue 2004)

15 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 15 Racial Identity Models Identity models explain the stages we are at in terms with our connectedness with our race. When we discuss, for example, the Black, Latino, or Asian identity models, we look at assimilation and acculturation within and around the White Euro-American culture. When we look at the White Identity Model, we look at how Whites deal with being the majority and acknowledgment of their privilege vs. others’ disadvantage.

16 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 16 White Identity Model Naiveté phase: It lasts the first 3 years of life. Social meanings are absent. The child is innocent, open, and spontaneous regarding differences.

17 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 17 Conformity phase: The white person’s attitudes and beliefs are very ethnocentric as there is minimal awareness of the self as a racial being. There is a strong belief in the universality of values and norms governing behavior. They know very little about other ethnic groups and rely on stereotypes as the main source of information. White Identity Model

18 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 18 Dissonance phase: “Movement into the dissonance stage occurs when the White person is forced to deal with the inconsistencies that have been compartmentalized or encounters information/experiences at odds with denial. In most cases, a person is forced to acknowledge Whiteness at some level, to examine their own cultural values, and to see the conflict between upholding humanistic nonracist values and their contradictory behavior.” “Dissonance may result in feelings of guilt, shame, anger, and depression.”

19 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 19 Resistance and Immersion phase: “The white person who progresses to this stage will begin to question and challenge his or her own racism. For the first time, the person begins to realize what racism is all about, and his or her eyes are suddenly open. Racism is seen everywhere (advertising, television, educational materials, interpersonal interactions, etc.). This phase of development is marked by a major questioning of one’s own racism and that of others in society. ” “Realities of oppression are realized as well as “the advantages being white grants”.

20 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 20 Integrative awareness phase: “Characterized by 1) understanding the self as a racial/cultural being, 2) being aware of sociopolitical influences regarding racism, 3) appreciating racial/cultural diversity, and 4) becoming more committed toward eradicating oppression. The person values multiculturalism, is comfortable around members of culturally different groups, and feels a strong connectedness with members of many groups.”

21 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 21 Commitment to antiracist action phase: “This phase is most characterized by social action. There is likely to be a consequent change in behavior and an increased commitment toward eradicating oppression. Seeing ‘wrong’ and actively working to ‘right’ it requires moral fortitude and direct action.” “Objecting to racist jokes, trying to educate family, friends, neighbors, and coworkers… are examples of individuals who achieve this status.”

22 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 22 “When someone pushes racism into my awareness, I feel guilty (that I could be doing so much more); angry (I don’t like to feel like I’m wrong); defensive (I already have two black friends… I worry more about racism than most whites do – isn’t that enough); turned off (I have other priorities in my life with guilt about that thought); helpless (the problem is so big – what can I do?). I HATE TO FEEL THIS WAY. That is why I minimize race issues and let them fade from my awareness whenever possible.”

23 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 23 If anything can help ease the conscience of an unintentional suppressor, it is that all races, including White, are victims of racism. We have all been programmed by society to be racist.

24 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 24 RACIST Not only is everyone a victim of racism, everyone is RACIST Only when we accept it can we do something about it

25 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 25 What can we do? Realize that all cultures are valid and valuable. Begin appreciating other cultures. Ask others about their cultures. Take field trips to cultural centers. Point out the elephant in the room “We are not from the same culture, do you feel comfortable discussing this with me?”

26 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 26 Multiculturalism “Refers to the process of recognizing, understanding and appreciating cultures other than one’s own. It stresses an appreciation of the impact of differences…” Cultures are more than racial, they include class, age, physical, sexual/affectional orientation, and religions. If you struggle with how to proceed, ask yourself: What does it feel like to be older, a woman, of a different religion? (We can feel the other side when we look at differences in this light) Multiculturalism

27 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 27 Research and Resource Culturally Diverse Counseling D.W. Sue, 2004

28 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 28 Asian African American Native America Latino/ Hispanic European American

29 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 29 Asian African American Native Latino/ Hispanic European American

30 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 30 So what…..? I must know; Myself in order to understand others My values, my beliefs, my opinions and how they impact my decisions and others. The impact of my power to influence.

31 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 31 Topics of Discussion Why Culturally focus teaching? Being conscious of what you do unconsciously. Building Relationships with All students. Build relationships with parents and the community Shift in Thinking How we work with students Culturally Relevant Teaching what does it look like?

32 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 32 What do we know? Minority students continue to lag behind their counterparts on all standard measures of achievement. Minority students are three times more likely to drop out and twice as likely to suspended from school. These same statistics correlate to minority students coming from harsh social and economical realities.

33 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 33 What do we know? Most minority students are already segregated in “community schools” usually in the inner city area. African Americans and other minorities who attend private or independent schools consistently show higher levels of achievement than those who attend public schools.

34 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 34 What do we know? “Although the 1960s produced a large body of literature on teaching the disadvantaged and the 1970s produced a body of literature about effective schools none of it was aimed at specifically preparing teachers to meet the needs of minority and disadvantaged students. Even today some of the more popular educational innovations, such as cooperative learning and whole language approaches to literacy, were developed and refined to improve achievement among disadvantaged students. Unfortunately the relationship of these practices to minority learners is rarely made clear.”

35 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 35 What do we know? Society fails to recognize African Americans as a distinct cultural group. Society tends to relate minority low performance and achievement to environmental and social factors (poverty and lack of opportunity). One in three Latino children live in poverty. Poor children are much more likely than non-poor children to suffer developmental delay and damage to drop out of high school, and give birth during the teen years. Children from poverty are more likely to be raised by a single parent.

36 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 36 What do we know? Poor youth living in the inner city are more likely to be victims of child abuse or neglect than are other children. Poverty is caused by parental employment status, earnings, family structure, and a parental education.

37 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 37 HMMMMMMMM??? “It is not that we don’t want to change; it’s that we often don’t realize there’s a need for change or how to go about making the change.” Megan Milani

38 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 38 Think of a time when someone’s message, tone, body language or actions affected your feelings or your thinking. 1. Describe what the person did? 2. How did this action make you feel? 3. Were you able to determine if it was intentional or a perception created by yourself? 4. How do you know? Group Activity Stop, Think and Discuss it!

39 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 39 Be Conscious of what you do unconsciously! “If we were to look closely at even the simple things we subconsciously do each day, we would probably be stunned by the implications and the impact on our students.” Sometimes what we do unintentionally: our actions, tone, words, and body language may imply a wrong perception to others.

40 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 40 Scenarios/Role Play Act out or read the scene. Discuss what the issue is. Explain how you would handle this. What could have been done differently? Are there any hidden innuendos? What other factors might we need to consider?

41 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 41 Be Conscious of what you do unconsciously! The teachers who communicate to children through words and actions what they believed to be their true potential, empower students to begin to believe in themselves.

42 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 42 Shift in Thinking We have to believe that every student in our classroom can reach their full potential and will learn. We must observe students through a new lens, and refrain from making judgments that put limits on kids.

43 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 43 Shift in Thinking Change your thinking from “there is something wrong with this kid, to perhaps there is something wrong with the way we are teaching or approaching this child. Hmmmmmm?

44 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 44 Shift in Thinking Bring your assumptions down to where you can challenge them. “Assumptions have a truth status that are uncertain.”

45 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 45 Shift in Thinking Think of different way to approach the child. Every day is a new day, forget what happen previously and rethink your approach. Find a mentor to work with your students. CAP-Caring Adult Program Contact outside agency

46 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 46 Milani’s Research from “The 3 Habits of Highly Successful Reading Teachers” Students have a good sense of what we think of them, if we believe in them, and what we expect of them. Teachers indicate true feelings all the time. Expressions on our faces may be fleeting, but they are there and others are easily able to pick them up and ascertain what they mean. It is vital to know how much you can affect the students you teach, and how well they do.

47 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 47 “Students don’t think like adults think, but they feel like adults feel.” Lee Jenkins

48 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 48 Building Relationships with Students Think about the message you send to students, by your tone, your words, your body language Convey positive messages to All students In your classroom, remind students everyday that you know they are smart, and that sometimes learning is hard work but that you’re there for them. Try something new

49 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 49 Building Relationships with Students Observe your students to see how they learn best Make sure the classroom environment is one where students feel comfortable, appreciated, and safe. Look at your students in a new way

50 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 50 Building Relationships with Students Don’t assume you already know what to do for a child look for the truth. It is imperative that you tell each child that she or he is capable and is making progress. Celebrate every step toward the goal.

51 Culturally Relevant Teaching Culturally Relevant Knowledge is continuously recreated, recycling and shared by teachers and students. It is not static or unchanging. Knowledge is viewed critically Teacher is passionate about content Teacher helps students develop necessary skills Teacher sees excellence as a complex standard that may involve some postulates but takes student diversity and individual differences into account Assimilations Knowledge is static and is passed in one direction, from teacher to student. Knowledge is viewed as infallible Teacher is detached, neutral about content Teacher expects students to demonstrate prerequisite skills. Teachers sees excellence as a postulate that exists independently from student diversity or individual differences. Research from Successfully Teaching African-American Students, Gloria Ladson-Billings, pg. 81

52 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 52 Create the Optimal Environment by intentionally Purposefully make students feel comfortable Making students feel appreciated Making students feel safe Listen, listen, listen Purposefully, help students feel valued Connecting reading and learning to culture and environment Looking at students in new ways Giving students opportunities Holding students accountable Intentionally building rapport with parents

53 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 53 Purposefully include opportunities for learning about different cultures. Go to community events where your students are. Invite Parents to your classroom to view student presentation. Determine with the class what will be your symbol for respect of diversity. Connect reading and learning to culture. Do community service in surrounding neighborhoods and in your classroom. Host Parent nights specifically showcasing student work/project. Cultural Relevant Focus Don’t assume you can relate to other cultures.

54 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 54 What factors influence brain development and academic achievement? Genes Love Positive reinforce- ment and Feedback Exercise Nutrition Challenge and the Arts Social Emotional Psychological Physical

55 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 55 Resources Billings-Ladson, Gloria, Successful Teachers of African-American Children. Clark, Ron, The Essential 55. Covey, Stephen, R. The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People and The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teens. Garner, Betty, Getting to Got it! Pavik, Robert and Ramsey, Richard, Reading and Writing Sourcebook. Jensen, Eric, Teaching with the brain in mind. Peters, Stephen, Do You Know Enough About Me to Teach Me? Teaching Tolerance (magazine subscription) Educational Leadership (magazine subscription) Educate yourself and be in the know!

56 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 56 “It is well-known that when we are in an environment where we feel comfortable, appreciated, and safe, we thrive. If we know that our opinions matter, that we are listened to and valued, it’s a place where we want to be. When we know what the expectations are and that much is expected of us, and we are given the tools, time, and guidance to reach our goals, we surpass what we think we’re capable of.”

57 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 57 1.Be conscious of what we do unconsciously? 2.Shift in our thinking about how we approach and work with minority learners. 3.Intentionally, genuinely build relationships with students. 4.Intentionally, genuinely embed opportunities for cultural learning into instruction. 5.Intentionally, build relationships with parents and be involved in the community. What did we learn? What will we do?

58 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 58 The world is a rainbow With Many Kinds of People

59 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 59 It takes all kinds of people, To make the world go round!

60 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 60 “Kids only have one chance for an education--- and we need to have the courage to stand up for them.” Anne Duncan

61 “Gods little flowers, that’s what I call them. Every one a little different but every one so sweet. And just like a garden, the classroom has got to be a place that nurtures them. They don’t all need the same thing. One might need a little pruning and some might need to roam free. They’re just so precious and it breaks my heart to see the hurtful way they are treated. Some teachers think they are hard because they live tough lives but they are just as fragile as hothouse orchids.” Elizabeth Harris God’s little flowers….

62 Created by Marlene Bryan Smith and Robin Ambrosini 62 Contact Information Marlene Bryan Smith (704) Robin Ambrosini (704)


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