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C ésar E. Chavez Institute SFSU Building Racial Wellness Training of Trainers Session #1 Shawn A. Ginwright, Ph.D. Associate Professor, Africana Studies.

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Presentation on theme: "C ésar E. Chavez Institute SFSU Building Racial Wellness Training of Trainers Session #1 Shawn A. Ginwright, Ph.D. Associate Professor, Africana Studies."— Presentation transcript:

1 C ésar E. Chavez Institute SFSU Building Racial Wellness Training of Trainers Session #1 Shawn A. Ginwright, Ph.D. Associate Professor, Africana Studies College of Ethnic Studies San Francisco State University

2 C ésar E. Chavez Institute SFSU Goals & Purpose of Today’s Training  What?  Training of trainers  Why?  Building the capacity of school personnel to build and sustain racial wellness.  How?  Trainings will involve;  Readings, and discussions  Activities  Online chats

3 C ésar E. Chavez Institute SFSU What is Racial Wellness?

4 C ésar E. Chavez Institute SFSU Racial wellness refers to a state of health and well- being based on a holistic understanding of race and ethnic diversity. We use the word to convey to convey three key ideas 1. Racial inequality is socially toxic. 2. Our understanding of race is intensely personal. 3. Structural racism can be confronted through personal transformation. What is Racial Wellness?

5 C ésar E. Chavez Institute SFSU Honest dialogue Risk taking Culture of understanding and respect Focus on self work aimed at structural changes What does racial wellness look like?

6 C ésar E. Chavez Institute SFSU Is Race Real? What is Race? Biology--congenital inferiority and superiority. Social Construction- imagined, and sustained by society. Racial formation- Defined by the state with changing meaning and texture of race relations

7 C ésar E. Chavez Institute SFSU Limitations of Views of Racism Bonilla-Silva Race is excluded from the foundation of society seen as individual acts. Racism is viewed at the psychological and therefore individual level. Racism is treated as static phenomena. Defining racism as idealist views racism as incorrect or irrational thinking. Thus a racists is irrational. Racism is understood as overt behavior. Racism is conceptualized as “original sin” and based in historical phenomena (slavery, capitalism). Does not view as contemporary.

8 C ésar E. Chavez Institute SFSU Views…Examples…. Racism System of power and privilege based on racial categories and phenotype. Bigotry Overt behavior that stems from hatred and animosity toward racial and ethnic groups. Prejudice Prejudgment and stereotyping individuals from racial and ethnic groups. Discrimination Actions which create barriers and remove opportunities for racial and ethnic groups. Common views of racism

9 C ésar E. Chavez Institute SFSU What is Racism? Actors in the dominant position develop a set of social practices (a racial praxis) and an ideology to maintain advantages based on racial classification Bonilla-Silva 2002

10 C ésar E. Chavez Institute SFSU Racial disparities in youth arrest rates U.S. Census Bureau (2000) Justice Statistics. Criminal Justice Institute.

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17 C ésar E. Chavez Institute SFSU References to check out Aneshensel, C. S. and C. A. Sucoff (1996). "The Neighborhood Context of Adolescent Mental Health." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 37(4): Kramer, R. C. (2000). "Poverty, Inequality, and Youth Violence." Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 567: Flores-Gonzez, N., M. Rodruez, et al. (2006). From Hip-Hop to Humanization: Youth, Civil Society, and Community Change. Beyond Resistance!: Youth Resistance and Community Change: New Democratic Possibilities for Practice and Policy for America's Youth. S. Ginwright, P. Noguera and J. Cammarota. New York, Routledge. Ginwright, S. (2003). Youth Organizing: Expanding Possibilities for Youth Development. New York, Funder's Collaborative on Youth Organizing:Occasional Papers Series, Paper #3. Ginwright, S. and T. James (2002). "From Assets to Agents: Social Justice, Organizing and Youth Development." New Directions in Youth Development 96(Winter). Ginwright, S., P. Noguera, et al., Eds. (2006). Beyond Resistance!: Youth Resistance and Community Change: New Democratic Possibilities for Practice and Policy for America's Youth. New York, Routledge. Watts, R. J. and O. Guessous (2006). Sociopolitical Development: The Missing Link in Research and Policy on Adolescents. Beyond Resistance!: Youth Resistance and Community Change: New Democratic Possibilities for Practice and Policy for America's Youth. S. Ginwright, P. Noguera and J. Cammarota. New York, Routledge.

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