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Prejudicial Behaviour Grade 9&10 Curriculum- Class One.

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Presentation on theme: "Prejudicial Behaviour Grade 9&10 Curriculum- Class One."— Presentation transcript:

1 Prejudicial Behaviour Grade 9&10 Curriculum- Class One

2 Objective Objective To influence changing attitudes towards prejudicial intentional and non-intentional remarks. To influence changing attitudes towards prejudicial intentional and non-intentional remarks.

3 Definition Prejudice: A set of opinions/attitudes towards a certain group or individuals within it that cast that group and its members in an inferior light and for which there is no legitimate basis or fact derived from the word “pre-judged”. Prejudice: A set of opinions/attitudes towards a certain group or individuals within it that cast that group and its members in an inferior light and for which there is no legitimate basis or fact derived from the word “pre-judged”.

4 Unintentional Prejudice Intentional Prejudice Response to Confrontation If behaviour is in conflict with intentional beliefs, then guilt might result Possible denial Possible defensive reaction No guilt Possible denial Possible defensive reaction Recommended Intervention Gently increase awareness through discussion Show acceptance for individual Practice to create new habit responses and new "self-talk" Increase exposure to target group. Intervention is extremely difficult. Often advisable to contain, limit or manage the behaviour Very responsive to power figures. Change involves issues of self-worth, trust, security, acceptance of ambiguity, and other issues. Very much like a personality disorder

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6 Principles of Prejudice Any force which is directed toward a target can be redirected much more easily than it can be confronted, resisted and stopped Any force which is directed toward a target can be redirected much more easily than it can be confronted, resisted and stopped

7 Direct Opposition is Ineffective Any person or group who is the target of a force is not located in a position to provide an efficient or effective intervention for their own defence. Any person or group who is the target of a force is not located in a position to provide an efficient or effective intervention for their own defence.

8 The Opportunity of the Non-Target Person

9 Discussion Questions Discuss how prejudice and discrimination are not only harmful to the victim but also to those who practice them. Discuss how prejudice and discrimination are not only harmful to the victim but also to those who practice them. Is it possible to grow to adulthood without harbouring at least some prejudice toward minorities? Is it possible to grow to adulthood without harbouring at least some prejudice toward minorities? What can you do to fight prejudice in your neighbourhood or school? What can you do to fight prejudice in your neighbourhood or school? Have you ever been told not to venture through a certain neighbourhood? Why would anyone suggest this? Is any of this based on prejudice? Are there stereotypes of the people in that neighbourhood? Would those people feel safe venturing into your neighbourhood? Why or why not? Have you ever been told not to venture through a certain neighbourhood? Why would anyone suggest this? Is any of this based on prejudice? Are there stereotypes of the people in that neighbourhood? Would those people feel safe venturing into your neighbourhood? Why or why not?

10 Activity 1 (Movie Clips) American History X American History X Austin Powers 3: Gold member Austin Powers 3: Gold member

11 Activity 2 (Class) Discuss prejudice towards gender in the sporting world. Discuss prejudice towards gender in the sporting world.

12 Activity 2 (Discussion) Males are belittled when enrolled in ballet, cheerleading, dance, fieldhockey, figure skating, and gymnastics. Males are belittled when enrolled in ballet, cheerleading, dance, fieldhockey, figure skating, and gymnastics. Women are inhibited from enrolling in football, contact hockey, ski jumping (Olympic). Women are inhibited from enrolling in football, contact hockey, ski jumping (Olympic). Women are not allowed to try out for male teams. Women are not allowed to try out for male teams. Men are not allowed in female leagues. Men are not allowed in female leagues.

13 Stereotypes Class Two

14 Objective Inform students that stereotyping often results from, and leads to, prejudice which when unchecked leads to discrimination, and violence. Inform students that stereotyping often results from, and leads to, prejudice which when unchecked leads to discrimination, and violence.

15 Definition Stereotype: A belief about the personal attributes of a group of people. Stereotype: A belief about the personal attributes of a group of people. - Can be positive or negative - Can be positive or negative

16 Class Discussion What do you think are some common stereotypes? What do you think are some common stereotypes?

17 Common Stereotypes Height and size= Athlete Height and size= Athlete All football players are dumb jocks All football players are dumb jocks Cheerleaders are promiscuous Cheerleaders are promiscuous Blondes have more fun Blondes have more fun Brand name clothes= cool/popular Brand name clothes= cool/popular African-americans are better at basketball African-americans are better at basketball All tall people play basketball All tall people play basketball White men can’t jump White men can’t jump

18 Common Stereotypes Men are the primary breadwinner Men are the primary breadwinner Social class determines popularity Social class determines popularity All people with high averages are nerds All people with high averages are nerds All people with glasses are nerds All people with glasses are nerds You have to smoke to be cool You have to smoke to be cool Drugs are cool Drugs are cool To be successful you need to cheat, lie, and steal To be successful you need to cheat, lie, and steal Guys who cheerlead are gay Guys who cheerlead are gay

19 Types Of Stereotypes race, race, race ethnicity, ethnicity, ethnicity gender, gender, gender sexual orientation, sexual orientation, sexual orientation sexual orientation nationality, or nationality, or nationality religious belief, along with religious belief, along with religious profession and profession and profession social class (see social stereotype). social class (see social stereotype). social classsocial stereotype social classsocial stereotype size, size, Disability Disability

20 How are they developed? generalizations generalizations Because of experiences we have had ourselves, read about in books and magazines, seen in movies or television, or have had related to us by friends and family. Because of experiences we have had ourselves, read about in books and magazines, seen in movies or television, or have had related to us by friends and family. For example, if we are walking through a park late at night and encounter three senior citizens wearing fur coats and walking with canes, we may not feel as threatened as if we were met by three high school-aged boys wearing leather jackets. Why is this so? We have made a generalization in this case. For example, if we are walking through a park late at night and encounter three senior citizens wearing fur coats and walking with canes, we may not feel as threatened as if we were met by three high school-aged boys wearing leather jackets. Why is this so? We have made a generalization in this case.

21 Stereotypes in the Media The instantly recognizable nature of stereotypes mean that they are very useful in producing effective advertising and situation comedy? The instantly recognizable nature of stereotypes mean that they are very useful in producing effective advertising and situation comedy? Can you think of any television shows that exhibit stereotyping? Can you think of any television shows that exhibit stereotyping?

22 Examples of stereotyping in media Saved by the bell. The prep (Zach), jock (Slater), Geek (Screech), cheerleader (Kelly), feminist (jessie), and superficial fashion oriented (Lisa). Saved by the bell. The prep (Zach), jock (Slater), Geek (Screech), cheerleader (Kelly), feminist (jessie), and superficial fashion oriented (Lisa). The Simpsons characters The Simpsons characters Family Guy characters Family Guy characters

23 Discussion Questions Why do some people join groups such as the KKK? How do stereotypes affect people? Why do some people join groups such as the KKK? How do stereotypes affect people? Why are stereotypes potentially harmful? Why are stereotypes potentially harmful? limit individuals’ ability to interact successfully with others in our diverse world. limit individuals’ ability to interact successfully with others in our diverse world. Changes into prejudice or racism Changes into prejudice or racism How might you teach an individual using stereotyping to change their attitudes. How might you teach an individual using stereotyping to change their attitudes.

24 Organizations Kids Help Phone Kids Help Phone Thunder Bay District Health Unit Thunder Bay District Health Unit Gender Issues Center Gender Issues Center

25 Activity 1 (Group) Have students complete the following sentences, then break up into small groups to compare their answers and discuss if there is any prejudice and bigotry in their answers or in those of their classmates, as well as what factors (e.g., television, newspapers, friendships, attitudes of their parents) may have contributed to such prejudice. Have students complete the following sentences, then break up into small groups to compare their answers and discuss if there is any prejudice and bigotry in their answers or in those of their classmates, as well as what factors (e.g., television, newspapers, friendships, attitudes of their parents) may have contributed to such prejudice.

26 Activity 1 (Group) 1. All athletes are 2. People on welfare are all 3. Drugs are used by virtually 4. All homosexuals are 5. All politicians are 6. All people with AIDS are 7. All people who sleep on grates are

27 Activity 1 (Group) 8. All Christian Fundamentalists are 8. All Christian Fundamentalists are 9. All male hairdressers are 9. All male hairdressers are 10. All male ballet dancers are 10. All male ballet dancers are 11. All construction workers are 11. All construction workers are 12. He's so dumb, he must be 12. He's so dumb, he must be 13. He's so smart, he must be 13. He's so smart, he must be 14. He's quick-tempered, so he must be 14. He's quick-tempered, so he must be 15. He drinks like a fish, so he must be 15. He drinks like a fish, so he must be

28 Discussion Questions Is there an "African-American" area of your community? A "white" area? Is there an area which is "restricted" to one race, religion, or national origin? What would the consequences be for someone of the "wrong" race, religion, or national origin to seek to reside in that area? Is there an "African-American" area of your community? A "white" area? Is there an area which is "restricted" to one race, religion, or national origin? What would the consequences be for someone of the "wrong" race, religion, or national origin to seek to reside in that area? Which statements in the movies would be considered racist? Which statements in the movies would be considered racist? How could you change the statement to be free of racism? How could you change the statement to be free of racism?

29 Racism Class Three

30 Objective For the students to become aware of what constitutes a racial statement and to change negative attitudes towards racism. For the students to become aware of what constitutes a racial statement and to change negative attitudes towards racism.

31 Definition Racism- Racism- A set of erroneous assumptions, opinions, and actions stemming from the belief that one race is inherently superior to another. A set of erroneous assumptions, opinions, and actions stemming from the belief that one race is inherently superior to another.

32 Main Levels of Racism 1. Individual 2. Institutional 3. Cultural

33 Individual Racism Takes the form of individual attitudes, beliefs, values and behaviours. Racial prejudice, bigotry, belittling and jealousy are examples of racist attitudes. Examples of racist beliefs are racial stereotypes, the belief that some races are better than others and even the belief that people can be classified according to race in the first place. Violence, name-calling and discrimination in hiring are examples of racist behaviour. Takes the form of individual attitudes, beliefs, values and behaviours. Racial prejudice, bigotry, belittling and jealousy are examples of racist attitudes. Examples of racist beliefs are racial stereotypes, the belief that some races are better than others and even the belief that people can be classified according to race in the first place. Violence, name-calling and discrimination in hiring are examples of racist behaviour.prejudicestereotypesprejudicestereotypes

34 Institutional or Systemic Racism Takes the form of the practices, customs, rules and standards of organizations, including governments, that unnecessarily disadvantage people because of their race, color or ethnicity. They do not always involve differences in treatment. Educational requirements that are not related to actual job duties are an example. Takes the form of the practices, customs, rules and standards of organizations, including governments, that unnecessarily disadvantage people because of their race, color or ethnicity. They do not always involve differences in treatment. Educational requirements that are not related to actual job duties are an example.

35 Cultural Racism Are the cultural values and standards that disadvantage people because of their race, color or ethnicity. Examples are cultural expectations as to the race of a company president and the cultural standard for what a beautiful, trustworthy or competent person looks like. Are the cultural values and standards that disadvantage people because of their race, color or ethnicity. Examples are cultural expectations as to the race of a company president and the cultural standard for what a beautiful, trustworthy or competent person looks like.

36 History of Racism Anthropologists, scientists who study humans and their origins, generally accept that the human species can be categorized into races based on physical and genetic makeup. Anthropologists, scientists who study humans and their origins, generally accept that the human species can be categorized into races based on physical and genetic makeup. (For example, many, but certainly not all African- Americans have physical differences from Caucasians beyond their dark skin, such as wiry hair)

37 History of Racism Virtually all scientists accept the fact that there is no credible scientific evidence that one race is culturally or psychologically different from any other, or that one race is superior to another. Past studies which reached conclusions other than that have been found to be seriously flawed in their methodology or inherently biased.

38 History of Racism Yet despite overwhelming scientific evidence to the contrary, there are people who maintain that their own race is superior to all others. These people, known collectively as "racists," are the most likely to engage in discrimination, persecution, and violence against those they deem to be members of "inferior" races. Yet despite overwhelming scientific evidence to the contrary, there are people who maintain that their own race is superior to all others. These people, known collectively as "racists," are the most likely to engage in discrimination, persecution, and violence against those they deem to be members of "inferior" races.

39 Examples of Racist Statements 1. Mount McKay is owned by an Indian reserve. - Aboriginals 2. Thunder bay has a very small black community. - African Americans

40 Assignment Give out a paragraph and ask students to identify and correct any prejudicial, racist, sexist, stereotypical phrases (anything discriminatory). Give out a paragraph and ask students to identify and correct any prejudicial, racist, sexist, stereotypical phrases (anything discriminatory). Leave window of ten minutes to complete, then take up with class as a discussion. Leave window of ten minutes to complete, then take up with class as a discussion.

41 What can you do to Stop Racism? In the Community In the Community In Schools In Schools

42 In Community Take part in activities marking the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination every March 21. Take part in activities marking the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination every March 21. Join organizations dealing with issues of racism and human rights. Join organizations dealing with issues of racism and human rights. Suggest that your local newspaper publish a special section on the racial and cultural diversity of your community. Suggest that your local newspaper publish a special section on the racial and cultural diversity of your community. Create a speakers bureau of persons willing to speak about racism and human rights. Create a speakers bureau of persons willing to speak about racism and human rights. Explore ways in which community organizations can work together to promote positive race relations. Explore ways in which community organizations can work together to promote positive race relations. Suggest that your community develop a policy statement against all forms of racial discrimination. Suggest that your community develop a policy statement against all forms of racial discrimination.

43 In Schools Object to racist jokes and insults. Object to racist jokes and insults. Organize an inter-cultural music or film festival. Organize an inter-cultural music or film festival. Invite guests to speak on racism and human rights. Invite guests to speak on racism and human rights. Organize a poster or essay contest. Organize a poster or essay contest. Show films on prejudice, stereotyping, discrimination and racism. Show films on prejudice, stereotyping, discrimination and racism. Examine the contents of television, film, radio and newspapers for stereotypes. Identify and discuss the stereotypes. Examine the contents of television, film, radio and newspapers for stereotypes. Identify and discuss the stereotypes. Find out about human rights organizations in your area and what role they play. Find out about human rights organizations in your area and what role they play. Suggest that your class or school develop a policy statement against all forms of racial discrimination. Suggest that your class or school develop a policy statement against all forms of racial discrimination.

44 Activity (Speaker) Shaniqua Carter- She was attacked by the Caucasians at her high- school, and she was suspended because she fought back to defend herself. Shaniqua Carter- She was attacked by the Caucasians at her high- school, and she was suspended because she fought back to defend herself. - shows one of the negative affects racism can have within your community. - shows one of the negative affects racism can have within your community.

45 Activity (Group) Break class into three groups. Break class into three groups. Identify examples of stereotypes and prejudicial behaviour in your favourite television shows. Identify examples of stereotypes and prejudicial behaviour in your favourite television shows. Describe the stereotype portrayed by specific characters. Describe the stereotype portrayed by specific characters.


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