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Addressing Institutional Racism: One District’s Story Tammy Campbell & Dr. Lorna L. Spear Executive Directors of Teaching & Learning Services Spokane Public.

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Presentation on theme: "Addressing Institutional Racism: One District’s Story Tammy Campbell & Dr. Lorna L. Spear Executive Directors of Teaching & Learning Services Spokane Public."— Presentation transcript:

1 Addressing Institutional Racism: One District’s Story Tammy Campbell & Dr. Lorna L. Spear Executive Directors of Teaching & Learning Services Spokane Public Schools

2 Leaders for Social Justice According to Singleton & Linton: Effective anti-racist/equity leadership goes beyond working to address obvious examples of institutional racism and inequities. This work is necessarily personal and far-reaching. Marching toward equity emerges as a life purpose for many educators as they focus on eradicating the racial caste system that exists in their classrooms, schools, and larger community. It appears insufficient, however, just to believe in and support anti-racism on a personal level. Systematic transformation requires that individual anti-racist efforts actually translate into improvements in pedagogies that positively impact colleagues’ work and improve students’ learning. (p ) Singleton, G., & Linton, C. (2006). Courageous conversations about race. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press

3 Goal 1: All students succeed at each grade level and graduate from high school well prepared for a variety of post-secondary pursuits in our democratic society. Strategic Objective 1: Create quality relationships and successful learning conditions for all students and staff. Goal 2: All district resources, programs, and departments are aligned to achieve high levels of student achievement and instructional excellence. Strategic Objective 5: Recruit, support, and retain a highly qualified and diverse staff. Goal 3: Parents and the community are actively engaged in supporting high levels of student achievement and instructional excellence. Strategic Objective 2: Engage parents and the community in securing and enhancing local, state, and federal funding to support the District’s mission. Strategic Objective 3: Use information and perspectives from students, staff, parents/guardians, and community to ensure continuous improvement of our school district. Previous Strategic Plan

4 Our Goal: All students succeed at each grade level and graduate from high school well prepared for a variety of post-secondary pursuits in our democratic society. Strategy 1: Ensure all students reach or exceed individual learning goals aligned with district standards and high school graduation requirements. Objective 1: Create quality relationships and safe, successful learning conditions for all students and staff. A. Support, empower and expect all staff to have knowledge of and be responsive to students and families of all cultures and circumstances. Strategy 2: Align all district resources, programs, and departments to attain high levels of student achievement and instructional excellence. Objective 3: Recruit, support, and retain a highly qualified, diverse and culturally responsive staff. Strategy 3: Engage parents and the community in supporting high levels of student achievement. Objective 1: Ensure quality relationships with all parents and guardians to support student academic achievement. A. Support, empower, and expect school, district and program staff to engage with and be responsive to families of all cultures and circumstances. Newly-Revised Strategic Plan

5 Why are we still on the journey? What strategies are we using? What are our successes and challenges? What’s next? Spokane Public Schools’ Journey to Close the Gap to Standard for Students of Color

6 “The single most important thing an organization can do to ensure it’s achieving the goals of it’s mission is to look for evidence.” Anthony Alvarado What Story Does the Data Tell?

7 Self-to-Self Staff-to-Student Student-to-Student Staff-to-Staff Staff-to-Family Institution-to-Student Institution-to-Community Framework for Change

8 This Work Begins with Self-Knowledge White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack 1. Read the article 2. When reading the daily effects of white privilege, highlight any conditions that jump out at you. McIntosh, P. (1990). White privilege: Unpacking the invisible knapsack. Wellesley, MA: Wellesley College Center for Research.

9 Why Race? Find a partner Chalk-Talk Activity— Take 5 minutes to quietly read the article at each station; Jot down your thoughts on the butcher paper; Take 5 minutes to discuss your thinking with your partner. You will repeat this process by moving clockwise to different stations when prompted by the facilitator.

10  Racial Micro-aggression-- subtle insults (verbal and nonverbal) aimed at people of color either consciously or unconsciously  Counter Spaces-- spaces in schools/communities that people of color, ELL, or other groups create to nurture an environment where they feel validated and important Limited or no eye contact Expecting knowledge expertise from white students/employees Curriculum/classroom images that depict whiteness as the norm Assuming staff of color are affirmative action hires Saying being smart is “white” Students gathering together in the cafeteria Classrooms where students see images of excellence and contributions of diverse peoples Teachers who look to all students as having knowledge and expertise Seeing staff, teachers, who look like you The New Leader of Today’s Schools Can See the INVISIBLE

11 New Lenses to See the Invisible Racial Micro-aggression—subtle insults (verbal and nonverbal) aimed at people of color consciously or unconsciously Using a pink highlighter, identify instances of racial micro-aggression in Curtis Linton’s autobiography. Counter Spaces—spaces in schools/communities that people of color, ELL, or other groups create to nurture an environment where they feel validated and important Using a yellow highlighter, identify instances of counter spaces in Glenn Singleton’s autobiography and using a pink highlighter, identify instances of racial micro- aggression in Glenn Singleton’s autobiography. Singleton, G., & Linton, C. (2006). Courageous conversations about race. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

12 “When Race and Class cease to be predictors of achievement.” Pedro Noguera How Will We Know We Have Truly Great Schools?

13 Reflection on Implications for Your District What are your entry points? What are the implications for your work? Your students? Your staff? Your community? Your district?

14 How Long Can Our Students Wait?


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