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Forest Biotechnology Global Opportunities for Somatic Embryogenesis.

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Presentation on theme: "Forest Biotechnology Global Opportunities for Somatic Embryogenesis."— Presentation transcript:

1 Forest Biotechnology Global Opportunities for Somatic Embryogenesis

2 Introduction and Outline Introduction Forest Biotechnology Products Competitive Analysis Identification of Markets Regulatory Review of Major Markets –Canada –United States –European Union –Australia and New Zealand Opportunities and Overview for Identified Markets –United States –European Union –Australia –New Zealand –Key Global Markets Strategic Recommendation

3 Introduction Plant genomics started in 1866 with Augustine Monk Gregor Mendel. Mendel died in 1884 without acknowledgement or recognition of his work. In 1866 Weissmann coined the term “germplasm”. Science has lead us to DNA mapping and gene- sequencing systems. Annual Global Forest Product Trade exceeds $140 billion.

4 Canadian Forest Product Trade (selected countries) Trade Surplus (Deficit) in thousand US dollars Australia $ 137, $ 120, $ 83, $ 99, $ 122, $ 62, Finland -$ 24, $ 32, $ 61, $ 49, $ 40, $ 61, Germany $ 571, $ 560, $ 400, $ 331, $ 482, $ 275, New Zealand $ 17, $ 17, $ 9, $ 8, $ 11, $ 4, Sweden $ 4, $ 12, $ 1, $ $ 7, $ 6, United Kingdom $ 553, $ 438, $ 382, $ 349, $ 405, $ 352, United States $15,851, $15,898, $16,222, $18,303, $18,363, $17,244,587.00

5 Forest Biotechnology Products FAO classifies into 3 types: Tools to assist in designing and monitoring tree conservation programs Technologies to enhance vegetative propagation and mass produce uniform materials Technologies to enhance characteristics and traits through genetic modification

6 Current Operational Product Somatic Embryogenesis A process used for the vegetative propagation of selected tree species through the maintenance of superior trait germplasm and perpetual harvest of somatic embryos. Commercial ventures include: Weyerhaeuser Corporation Westvaco Corporation – Pennsylvania/New York Cellfor Inc. – Victoria, Canada Arborgen Inc. – North Carolina/New Zealand Plantselct Inc. – Dartmouth, Ontario

7 Current Research Focus Canadian Forest Service current research projects: –Environmental Impacts of Forest Biotechnology –Conifer SE –Genetically Modified Trees –Genetically Engineered Baculoviruses for Forest Insect Management Applications Identification of genetically superior trees and genetic diversity Tree Propagation through tissue culture Tree Improvement through genetic engineering Environmental impact assessment of biotechnology-derived products Forest protection using biological pest control methods

8 Market Identification Forest biotechnology CREATES future value Forest biotechnology requires skill and experience Forest biotechnology must be responsible Future value must be included in management planning Requires protection of gained intellectual property and social infrastructure Requires established policies and legislation that represents social will and fosters environmental sustainability

9 Market Identification Therefore: –Country must have: Good social infrastructure to support maintaining skilled staff Intellectual property law and enactment Environmental biotechnology law and enactment Need/Ability for increased domestic production of forest products Major Suitable Markets: Canada United States European Union –Sweden –Finland –Germany New Zealand Australia

10 Regulatory Review of Identified Markets Canada –CEPA, 1999 regulated by Environment Canada –Strict environmental policies –Currently no approved products United States –Federal Plant Pest Act regulated by the USDA and EPA –Four phases of approval: Pending, Acknowledged, Regulated Status, and Nonregulated status –Walnut approved August, 2003 European Union –Full environmental risk assessment –Jointly regulated through several Ministries and Advisory Boards –Currently no approved products Australia and New Zealand –Based on ‘Precautionary Principle’ –Recent legislation and approval process under Gene Technology Act, 2000 and Plant Breeder’s Rights Act, 1996 –Currently no approved products

11 Opportunities and Overview of Identified Markets United States –$15 billion forest product trade deficit –Softwood Lumber Lengthy trade dispute based on US embitterment over ambiguous stumpage fee allocations from Government to Canadian forest companies Permanent U.S. countervailing and anti-dumping duties totaling 27% were imposed on Canadian exports effective May 22, 2002 –Still a major global consumer –Opportunities for joint research development and funding

12 Opportunities and Overview of Identified Markets United States Opportunities –Foreign investors seeking to divest from traditional forest products while maintaining a core competency in the industry; –Transparent regulatory policies with enacted legislation; and, –Primarily English-speaking economy.

13 Opportunities and Overview of Identified Markets European Union –GDP of Forest Products for all member states $520 billion –80% increase in exports to the US due to Canada-Us Softwood Lumber trade disputes –European Commission creates policies nd agenda on biotechnology for all member states to incorporate –Focused on Environmental impact and supporting research

14 Opportunities and Overview of Identified Markets European Union –Sweden More than 400 years of forest management history Increasing allowable sustainable cuts from intensive forest management = 4,000 km 2 per year IUFRO organizes annual symposium on Forest Biotechnology Extensive application of forest biotechnology research –creation of functional SE for Scandinavian tree species –Transgenic impact data modeling

15 Opportunities and Overview of Identified Markets European Union –Sweden Opportunities Intensively managed forests and forest management experience Strong research and development expenditures by Government Experienced and qualified research network SE is close to being operational for Norway spruce Government support research and development activities Committed university research departments Developed social infrastructure and societal networks Legislation protects intellectual property Progressive social view of biotechnology benefits to forestry

16 Opportunities and Overview of Identified Markets European Union –Finland 58% of all forestland is owned by private individuals Extensive family forestry farming culture Forest products comprise 29.2% of total exports Fragmented but well managed forest Communities all involved in forestry, high social awareness

17 Opportunities and Overview of Identified Markets European Union –Finland Opportunities Intensively managed forests and forest management experience Strong research and development expenditures by Government Experienced and qualified research network Extensive forestry land base SE is close to being operational for Norway spruce Government support research and development activities Committed university research departments Developed social infrastructure and societal networks Legislation protects intellectual property Progressive social view of biotechnology benefits to forestry

18 Opportunities and Overview of Identified Markets European Union –Germany Large global producer of pulp and paper Large forest product export surplus Intensively managed forests Institutes the Biotechnology 2000 program which funds research and development of application to local needs –Genetic engineering –Molecular biology

19 Opportunities and Overview of Identified Markets European Union –Germany Opportunities Intensively managed forests and forest management experience Developed social infrastructure and societal networks Extensive research and development infrastructure and support Enacted legislation protects intellectual property Progressive social view of biotechnology benefits to forestry

20 Opportunities and Overview of Identified Markets Australia Forestry comprises 1.1% of total GDP output and 7.5% of total manufacturing output Imports of $1.3 billion and exports of $3.23 billion Forest Product trade deficit of nearly $2 billion 21% of total land area is forested Plantations supply 50% of domestic need, 70% by 2015 Eucalyptus and pine reach maturity in 35 and 75 years, respectively

21 Opportunities and Overview of Identified Markets Australia Opportunities –SE is scientifically proven and functional for eucalyptus and pine, the primary Australian plantation species; –Government support programs and incentives for plantation investment and research and development activities; –Minimal established competition; –Large deficit of domestic production to consumption; –Regulatory infrastructure of legislation, advisory groups and oversight established; –Transparent regulatory policies with enacted legislation; –Primarily English-speaking economy; –Suitable environmental conditions and extended growing season to North America; –Developed social infrastructure and societal networks; –Commonwealth law protects intellectual property; and, –Progressive social view of biotechnology benefits to forestry

22 Opportunities and Overview of Identified Markets New Zealand –Intensive forest management for 50 years –Rotations beginning to increase sustainable allowable volumes 1998 to 2010 will have increased 100% –$1.9 billion forest product exports –$0.3 billion imports –Large forest biotech research facility in Wellington

23 Opportunities and Overview of Identified Markets New Zealand Opportunities –SE is scientifically proven and functional for eucalyptus and pine, the primary New Zealand plantation species –Government support programs and incentives for plantation investment and research and development activities –Primarily English-speaking economy –Suitable environmental conditions and extended growing season to North America –Developed social infrastructure and societal networks –Legislation protects intellectual property –Progressive social view of biotechnology benefits to forestry

24 Opportunities and Overview of Identified Markets Central America –Large global producer –Extensive environmental damage –Need for biotechnology remediation products Financially feasible China –Large global consumer –Extensive forests, but rugged terrain and fragmented agricultural lands

25 Canadian Support Canadian Forest Service –Research and development support Funding Research Professionals Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade –Trade relationships –Networking and contacts –Market analysis Canadian Institute of Forestry –Funding

26 Strategic Recommendation 1.7% annual increase in global consumption demand Scarce land resources Consumption can be met by enhancing quality and quantity through biotechnology Ensure contributions to policy development Ensure proper knowledge management and protection

27 Strategic Recommendation Focus on Australian Market Transparent and enacted legislation Property rights to knowledge recognized and enforced Large land base suitable for forest plantations Current technologies functional in Australian climate SE of eucalyptus and pine Extensive government funding and support to developments and research that focus on solving the forest product trade deficit Also maintain presence at research symposiums in EU, Canada and the US – contribute to policy development


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