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Guidance – 2008 We encourage schools in identifying gifted and talented learners to focus on: learners aged 11 – 19 who meet the published eligibility.

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Presentation on theme: "Guidance – 2008 We encourage schools in identifying gifted and talented learners to focus on: learners aged 11 – 19 who meet the published eligibility."— Presentation transcript:

1 Guidance – 2008 We encourage schools in identifying gifted and talented learners to focus on: learners aged 11 – 19 who meet the published eligibility criteria for the top 5% nationally, including those who were members of the former National Academy for Gifted and Talented Youth (NAGTY), and others who meet the criteria; in addition, learners aged 4 – 19 who are gifted relative to their peers in their own year group and school/college;

2 The requirements.. Schools are required to:- nominate a trained ‘leading’ teacher for gifted and talented education; one in each secondary school and for clusters of primary schools; have an agreed process for identifying gifted and talented pupils, making use of both qualitative and quantitative measures ensure that all staff understand this process and use it; indicate which of their pupils are gifted and talented in their School Census return; this data will contribute to the National Register for gifted and talented pupils; keep an accurate record of gifted and talented pupils; review the gifted and talented cohort regularly; self-evaluate and update the school’s process as necessary.

3 The challenges of teaching gifted and talented learners (1) Issues of inclusion: how to differentiate without isolating such pupils or putting them at odds with their peers. Pupils in this group can have a devastating appreciation of the weaknesses of others, including those in authority. The self- motivation of such pupils can result in extension and enrichment work for them being overlooked. Planning extension work that is not ‘more of the same’ but making it a genuine enrichment and extension of skills or interest.

4 The challenges of teaching gifted and talented learners (2) Gifted and talented pupils may include the ‘quirky, subversive, and socially confrontational’ as well as those who are sensitive, thoughtful, neatly written and imaginative. Some gifted and talented boys may be more skilful than mature. Adhering to the structure of lessons as prescribed by the department while keeping alive the curiosity and the active querying of the able and talented pupil.

5 Gifted and Talented Hard work is the number one prerequisite for grooming intelligence The dedicated individual is the one who achieves.

6 Provision Aptitude Classroom extension offer Extended curriculum offer Cross school enrichment Regional and National events and coaching e.g. at University Summer School National provision – online and face to face

7 Provision at GCC Parents’ meeting Student meeting, questionnaires, learning logs Individual mentoring (Students 127+ CATS mean) Events/activities Transfer Subject Leaders audit (Sow, differentiation, CPD) Faculty link Summer school

8 Implications for pedagogy A focus on able, gifted and talented pupils can help to extend the teaching repertoire by:- adding breadth increasing depth accelerating the pace of learning within and across key stages promoting independence in thinking and learning supporting reflection and self-evaluation fostering high expectations in teachers and pupils.

9 Some strategies for developing challenge for gifted and talented students Moving from:- Concrete to abstract (materials, ideas, applications) simple to complex (resources, research, issues, skills needed, targets set) basic to transformational (information, ideas, materials and applications) single to multi-faceted/divergent (making connections within or across subjects)

10 Some strategies for developing challenge for gifted and talented students (2) Moving from:- structured to open-ended (decisions, approaches and solutions become the learner’s responsibility) little to greater independence (planning, monitoring, evaluating) small to larger steps (in imagination, insight, application)

11 What students say A positive thinking teacher Challenging things to do: not copying, not just listening Group work Better briefs for supply teachers Extension materials Exciting work Teacher to focus on learning and leave “baggage” at the door Good communication from the teacher Good relationships/good management skills Rewards also for homework Comfortable learning environment

12 Ebac Ebac – 5 GCSEs A*-C in five core subjects-English, maths, two science qualifications, a foreign language and either history or geography More demanding and more appropriate for entry to best universities Positives for G and T students: an upturn in language learning, state school pupils receiving the same access to traditional subjects as their peers in private schools possibly improving their prospects of places at top universities, G and T students being steered towards languages and history and away from vocational programmes.

13 The coalition government - September 2010 Schools will have greater control and flexibility in how they design and deliver provision to meet the needs of their gifted and talented learners; Maintained schools and academies will receive additional funding (£250 per pupil claiming free school meals or classified as a looked-after child and identified as gifted through the school census) to support 14- to 19-year-old G & T pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds.


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