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Chapter 10 Frequency Response Techniques Frequency Response Techniques.

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1 Chapter 10 Frequency Response Techniques Frequency Response Techniques

2 Sinusoidal frequency response: a. system; b. transfer function; c. input and output waveforms The steady-state output sinusoid is The system function is given by

3 Analytical Expression for Frequency response

4 Frequency response plots for G(s) = 1/(s + 2): separate magnitude and phase Problem: Find the analytical expression for the magnitude and phase frequency response for a system G(s)=1/(s+2). Plot magnitude, phase and polar diagrams. Solution: substituting s=jw, we get The magnitude frequency response is The phase frequency response is The magnitude diagram is And the phase diagram is

5 Frequency response plots for G(s)= 1/(s + 2): polar plot The polar plot is a plot of For different values of w

6 Asymptotic Approximations: Bode plots Consider the transfer function The magnitude frequency response is Converting the magnitude response into dB, we obtain We could make an approximation of each term that would consists only of straight lines, then combine these approximations to yield the total response in dB

7 a. magnitude plot; b. phase plot. Asymptotic Approximations: Bode plots The straight-line approximations are called asymptotes. We have low frequency asymptote and high frequency asymptote a is called the break frequency Bode plots for G(s) = (s + a): At low frequency when ω approaches zero The magnitude response in dB is 20log M=20log a where and is constant and plotted in Figure (a) from ω =0.01a to a. At high frequencies where ω ˃˃ a The magnitude response in dB is

8 Table 10.1 Asymptotic and actual normalized and scaled frequency response data for (s + a)

9 Figure 10.7 Asymptotic and actual normalized and scaled magnitude response of (s + a)

10 Figure 10.8 Asymptotic and actual normalized and scaled phase response of (s + a)

11 Normalized and scaled Bode plots for a. G(s) = s; b. G(s) = 1/s;

12 Normalized and scaled Bode plots for c. G(s) = (s+a); d. G(s) = 1/(s+a);

13 Closed-loop unity feedback system Example Problem : Draw the Bode plot for the system shown in figure where Solution: The Bode plot is the sum of the Bode plot for each first order term. To make it easeier we rewrite G(s) as

14 Bode log-magnitude plot for Example: a. components; b. composite

15 Table 10.2 Bode magnitude plot: slop contribution from each pole and zero in Example

16 Bode phase plot for Example: a. components; b. composite

17 Table 10.3 Bode phase plot: slop contribution from each pole and zero in Example 10.2

18 Bode asymptotes for normalized and scaled G(s) = At low frequencies G(s) becomes The magnitude M, in dB is therefore, At high frequencies And The log-magnitude is The log-magnitude equation is a straight line with slope 40dB/decade The low freq. asymptote and the high freq. asymptote are equal when Thus is called the break frequency for second order polynomial.

19 Bode asymptotes for normalized and scaled G(s) = a. magnitude; b. phase

20 Table 10.4 Data for normalized and scaled log-magnitude and phase plots for (s  n s +  n 2 ). Mag = 20 log(M/  n 2 ) (table continues) Freq.  n Mag (dB)  = 0.1 Phase (deg)  = 0.1 Mag (dB)  = 0.2 Phase (deg)  = 0.2 Mag (dB)  = 0.3 Phase (deg)  = 0.3

21 Freq.  n Mag (dB)  = 0.5 Phase (deg)  = 0.5 Mag (dB)  = 0.7 Phase (deg)  = 0.7 Mag (dB)  = 1 Phase (deg)  = 1 Table 10.4 (continued) Data for normalized and scaled log-magnitude and phase plots for (s  n s +  n 2 ). Mag = 20 log(M/  n 2 )

22 Normalized and scaled log-magnitude response for

23 Scaled phase response for

24 Bode Plots for G(s) = 1/ Bode plots for can be derived similarly to those for We find the magnitude curve breaks at the natural frequency and decreases at a rate of -40dB/decade. The phase plot is 0 at low frequencies. At 0.1 begins a decrease of -90 o /decade and continues until, where it levels off at -180 o.

25 Table 10.5 Data for normalized and scaled log-magnitude and phase plots for 1/(s  n s +  n 2 ). Mag = 20 log(M/  n 2 ) (table continues) Freq.  n Mag (dB)  = 0.1 Phase (deg)  = 0.1 Mag (dB)  = 0.2 Phase (deg)  = 0.2 Mag (dB)  = 0.3 Phase (deg)  = 0.3

26 Freq.  n Mag (dB)  = 0.5 Phase (deg)  = 0.5 Mag (dB)  = 0.7 Phase (deg)  = 0.7 Mag (dB)  = 1 Phase (deg)  = 1 Table 10.5 (continued) Data for normalized and scaled log-magnitude and phase plots for 1/(s  n s +  n 2 ). Mag = 20 log(M/  n 2 )

27 Normalized and scaled log magnitude response for

28 Scaled phase response for

29 Closed-loop unity feedback system Example Problem : Draw the Bode plot for the system shown in figure where Solution: The Bode plot is the sum of the Bode plot for each first order term, and the 2 nd order term. Convert G(s) to show the normalized components that have unity low-frequency gain. The 2 nd order term is normalized by factoring out forming Thus,

30 Bode magnitude plot for G(s) =(s + 3)/[(s + 2)(s 2 + 2s + 25)]: a. components; b. composite The low frequency value for G(s), found by letting s = 0, is 3/50 or dB The Bode magnitude plot starts out at this value and continues until the first break freq at 2 rad/s.

31 Table 10.6 Magnitude diagram slopes for Example

32 Bode phase plot for G(s) = (s + 3)/[(s +2)(s 2 + 2s + 25)]: a. components; b. composite

33 Table 10.7 Phase diagram slopes for Example

34 Introduction to the Nyquist criterion The Nyquist criterion relates the stability of a closed-loop system to the open-loop frequency response and open-loop pole location. We conclude that The poles of 1+G(s)H(s) are the same as the poles of G(s)H(s), the open-loop system The zeroes of 1+G(s)H(s) are the same as the poles of T(s), the closed-loop system

35 Mapping Contours concept If we take a complex number on the s-plane and substitute it into a function, F(s), another complex number results. This process is called Mapping. Consider the collection of points, called a contour (shown in Figure as Contour A). Contour A can be mapped through F(s) Into Contour B by substituting each point in contour A into Function F(s) and plotting the resulting complex numbers.

36 Examples of Contour Mapping If contour A maps clockwise then contour B maps clockwise if: F(s) has just Zeros or Poles that are not encircled by the contour The contour B maps counterclockwise if: F(s) has just Poles that are encircled by contour A

37 Examples of Contour Mapping If the Pole or Zero of F(s) is enclosed by contour A, then the mapping encircles the origin

38 Vector Representation of Mapping

39 Nyquist Contour is a contour which contains the imaginary axis and encloses the right half- place. The Nyquist contour is clockwise. A Clockwise Curve Starts at the origin. Travels along imaginary axis till r = ∞. At r = ∞, loops around clockwise. Returns to the origin along imaginary axis. The Nyquist Contour

40 a. Turbine and generator; b. block diagram of speed control system for Example 10.4 Sketching a Nyquist diagram

41 Vector evaluation of the Nyquist diagram for Example 10.4 a. vectors on contour at low frequency; b. vectors on contour around infinity; c. Nyquist diagram The Nyquist Diagram is plotted by substituting the points of the contour shown in Figure (a) into G(s) = 500/[(s+1)(s+3)(s+10)] It’s performing complex arithmetic using vectors of G(s) drawn to points of the contour as shown in (a) and (b) The resultant vector, R, found at any point is the product of zero vectors divided by product of pole vectors as in (c)

42 Vector evaluation of the Nyquist diagram for Example 10.4 a. vectors on contour at low frequency; b. vectors on contour around infinity; c. Nyquist diagram Evaluating G(s) at specified points we get So from A to C the magnitude is finite goes from 50/3 to 0 and the angle goes from 0 to -270 o From C to D the magnitude is 0 while there is an angle change of 540 o so goes from -270 o to 270 o

43 Vector evaluation of the Nyquist diagram for Example 10.4 The mapping can be explained analytically by Substituting s= jω and evaluating G(jω) at specified points Multiplying numerator and denominator by the complex conjugate of denominator, we obtain At 0 freq G(jω)=500/30= 50/3. Thus Nyquist diagram starts at 50/3 at an angle 0. As ω increases, the real part remains positive while imaginary part remains negative. At ω = √30/14, the real part becomes negative. At ω=√43 the Nyquist diagram crosses the negative real axis, the value at the crossing is Continuing toward ω = ∞, the real part is negative and imaginary is positive. At ω = ∞, G(jω)≈500j/ω 3 or approximately 0 at 90 o

44

45 Detouring around open-loop poles: a. poles on contour; b. detour right; c. detour left

46 a. Contour for Example 10.5; b. Nyquist diagram for Example 10.5 Nyquist Diagram for open-loop function with poles on contour Problem: Sketch the Nyquist diagram of unity feedback system where G(s)= (s+2)/ S 2 Solution: The system two poles at origin are on the contour and must be by-passed as in (a). Mapping DE is mirror of AB

47 Applying the Nyquist Criterion to determine stability a. contour does not enclose closed-loop poles; b. contour does enclose closed-loop poles If a contour A, that encircles the entire right half-plane is mapped through G(s)H(s), then the number of closed loop poles, Z, in the right half- plane equals the number of open-loop poles, P, that are in the right half-plane minus the number of counterclockwise revolutions, N, around -1 of the mapping; that is Z=P-N.

48 Demonstrating Nyquist stability: a. system; b. contour; c. Nyquist diagram We could set K=1 and position the critical point at -1/K rather than -1. Thus the critical point appears to move closer to the origin as K increases. For this example P=2, and the critical point must be encircled by the Nyquist diagram to yield N=2 and a stable system. The system is marginally stable if the Nyquist diagram intersect the real axis at -1 ( frequency at this point is the frequency at which the root locus crosses the jw axis.)

49 a. Contour for Example 10.6; b. Nyquist diagram Range of gain for stability via Nyquist criterion Problem: for the unity feedback system with G(s) = K/[s(s+3)(s+5)], find the range for stability, instability and the value of gain for marginal stability. Solution: first set K=1 and sketch Nyquist diagram for the system. Using the contour shown in (a), for all points on the imaginary axis, Next find the point where the diagram intersects the negative real axis by setting the imaginary part equal to zero. We find. and real part = Finally From the contour, P=0; for stability N must equal zero. So the system is stable if the critical point lies outside the contour. K can be increased by 1/ =120.5 before the diagram encircles -1. Hence for stability K< for marginal stability K=120.5 At this gain the frequency is

50 a. Contour and root locus of system that is stable for small gain and unstable for large gain; b. Nyquist diagram The system is stable at low values of gain, unstable at high values. This system is stable for the range of loop gain, K, that ensures that the open-loop magnitude is less than unity at that frequency where the phase angle is 180 o. Stability via Mapping Only the Positive jω-axis

51 a. Contour and root locus of system that is unstable for small gain and stable for large gain; b. Nyquist diagram The system is stable at high values of gain, unstable at low values. This system is stable for the range of loop gain, K, that ensures that the open-loop magnitude is greater than unity at that frequency where the phase angle is 180 o. Stability via Mapping Only the Positive jω-axis

52 Stability Design via mapping positive jw-axis Example Problem: for the unity feedback system with G(s) = K/[(s 2 +2s+2)(s+2)], find the range for stability, instability and the value of gain for marginal stability. Solution: since P=0, we want no encirclements of -1 for stability. Hence. A gain less than unity at +/- 180 is required. first set K=1 and sketch the portion of Nyquist diagram along the positive imaginary axis as shown in (a). We find the intersection with the negative real axis as Setting the imaginary part = zero, we find and substituting yields real part –(1/20) = This closed loop system is stable if the magnitude of the frequency response is less than unity at 180 o. Hence, the system is stable foe K 20, and marginally stable for K=20 (frequency at marginal stability is )

53 Nyquist diagram showing gain and phase margins Gain margin, G M, The gain margin is the change in open-loop gain, expressed in decibels (dB), required at 180 o of phase shift to make the closed-loop system unstable. Phase margin,, The phase margin is the change in open-loop phase shift required at unity gain to make the closed-loop system unstable. G M = 20log a.

54 Finding gain and phase margins Problem: find the gain and phase margins of system of previous example. If K = 6. Solution: to find the gain margin, first find the frequency where the Nyquist diagram crosses the negative real axis. The Nyquist diagram crosses the real axis at frequency of. The real part is calculated to be Thus, the gain can be increased by (1/0.3) =3.33 before the real part becomes -1. Hence the gain margin is G M = 20log 3.33 = dB. To find the phase margin, find the frequency for which the magnitude is unity. We need to solve the equation to find frequency = rad/s. at this freq. the phase angle is o. The difference between this angle and -180 o is 67.7 o, which is the phase margin.

55 Range of gain for stability via Bode plots Problem: use Bode plots to determine range of K within which the unity feed-back system with G(s) = K/[(s+2)(s+4)(s+5)] is stable. Solution: The closed loop system will be stable if the frequency response has a gain less than unity when the phase is +/-180 o We sketch the Bode plots as shown. The low- frequency gain of G(s)H(s) is found by setting s=0. So the Bode magnitude plot starts at K/40. For convenience let K = 40 so that the log-magnitude plot starts at 0 dB. At frequency 7rad/s, when phase is 180o, the magnitude is -20dB. So an increase in gain of +20dB is possible before system becomes unstable. Since the gain plot was scaled for a gain of 40, +20dB(a gain of 10) represents the required increase in gain above 40. Hence, the gain for instability is 40X10 =

56 Evaluating Gain and Phase Margins

57 Gain and Phase Margins from Bode plots Problem: If K =200 in the system of previous example, find the gain and phase margins Solution: The Bode plot in Figure is scaled to a gain of 40. If K=200, the magnitude plot would be 20log5 = dB higher. At phase = 180, on the magnitude plot the gain is -20. So the gain margin = = 6.02 dB To find phase margin, we look on the magnitude plot for freq where the gain is 0 dB ( dB normalized) occurs at 5.5 rad/s freq. At this freq the angle is 165 so the phase margin is (-180) = 15 degrees

58 Relation between Closed-Loop Transient and Closed-Loop Frequency Responses Using the open loop transfer function And closed-loop transfer function We evaluate the magnitude of the closed- loop freq response as A representative sketch of the log plot is shown in the Figure

59 Relation between Closed-Loop Transient and Closed-Loop Frequency Responses To relate the peak magnitude to the damping ratio we find At a frequency, of Since damping ratio is related to percent overshoot we can plot M P vs. percent overshoot

60 Response Speed and Closed-Loop Frequency Response We can relate the speed of the time response ( as measured in settling time, rising time, and peak time) and the bandwidth, of the Frequency response. The Bandwidth is defined as the frequency at which the magnitude response curve is 3 dB down from its value at zero frequency. The Bandwidth for a two-pole system can be found by finding that freq for M=1/2 (that is -3dB)

61 Figure Normalized bandwidth vs. damping ratio for: a. settling time; b. peak time; c. rise time Response Speed and Closed-Loop Frequency Response We relate to settling time and peak time by substituting And We get,

62 Figure Constant M circles Relation between Closed-Loop and Open-Loop Frequency Responses These circles are called constant M circles and are the locus of the closed-loop magnitude frequency response for unity feed back systems. If the polar frequency response of an open-loop function, G(s), is plotted and superimposed on top of the constant M circles, the closed-loop magnitude frequency response is determined by each intersection of this polar plot with the M circles.

63 Figure Constant N circles Relation between Closed-Loop and Open-Loop Frequency Responses These circles are called constant N circles If the polar frequency response of an open-loop function, G(s), is plotted and superimposed on top of the constant N circles, the closed-loop phase response is determined by each intersection of this polar plot with the N circles.

64 Nyquist diagram for Example and constant M and N circles Closed-Loop frequency response from Open-Loop frequency response Problem Find the closed-loop frequency response of the unity feedback system using G(s)=50/[s(s+3)(s+6)] Solution Evaluate the open-loop frequency function The Polar plot of the open-loop freq response ( Nyquist diagram) is shown superimposed over the M and N circles in the Figure

65 Closed-loop frequency response for Example Closed-Loop frequency response from Open-Loop frequency response The closed-loop magnitude frequency response can now be obtained by finding the intersection of each point of the Nyquist plot with the M circles. While the closed-loop phase response can be obtained by finding the intersection of each point of the Nyquist plot with the N circles. The result is shown in the Figure.

66 Nichols Charts Nichols Charts displays the constant M and N circles in dB, so that changes in gain are as simple to handle as in the Bode plots. The chart is a plot of the open-loop magnitude in dB vs. open-loop phase angle in degrees.

67 Nichols chart with frequency response for G(s) = K/[s(s + 1)(s + 2)] superimposed. Values for K = 1 and K = 3.16 are shown. Nichols Charts

68 Figure Phase margin vs. damping ratio

69 Figure Open-loop gain vs. open-loop phase angle for –3 dB closed-loop gain

70 Figure a. Block diagram (figure continues)

71 Figure (continu ed) b. Bode diagram s for system of Example 10.13

72 Figure Bode log- magnitude plots for Example 10.14

73 Figure Bode log-magnitude plot for Skill-Assessment Exercise 10.10

74 Figure Effect of delay upon frequency response

75 Figure Frequency response plots for G(s) = K/[s (s + 1)(s + 10)] with a delay of 1 second and K = 1: a. magnitude plot; b. phase plot

76 Figure Step response for closed-loop system with G(s) = 5/[s(s +1)(s + 10)]: a. with a 1 second delay; b. without delay

77 Figure Bode plots for subsystem with undetermined transfer function

78 Figure Original Bode plots minus response of G 1 (s) = 25/(s s + 25)

79 Figure Original Bode plot minus response of G 1 (s)G 2 (s) = [25/(s s +25)] · [90/(s + 90)]


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