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Global Pattern of Agriculture, Agribusiness and the Changes in Cultural Landscape AP Human Geography Unit 5: Agriculture Copeland.

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Presentation on theme: "Global Pattern of Agriculture, Agribusiness and the Changes in Cultural Landscape AP Human Geography Unit 5: Agriculture Copeland."— Presentation transcript:

1 Global Pattern of Agriculture, Agribusiness and the Changes in Cultural Landscape AP Human Geography Unit 5: Agriculture Copeland

2 Intensive vs. Extensive AG Extensive AG-use of small inputs of labor, fertilizers and capital (sheep, cattle) Intensive AG-use of large inputs of labor, fertilizers and capital (dairy, eggs, fruits/ veggies-perishable)

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15 Truck Farming Crops

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26 Agricultural Landscape The agricultural imprint of cultivation on the land The patterns of fields and properties created as people occupy land for the purpose of farming

27 Cadastral Systems A system the delineates property lines Adopted in places where settlement could be regulated by law Three Types: 1) Township-and-Range System 2) Metes and Bounds 3) Long-Lot Survey

28 Township-and-range system Designed to facilitate the dispersal of settlers evenly across farmlands of the interior Basic unit = section (1sq. Mi of land) Land frequently bought in half or quarter sections Townships – (36 sq. mi) serve as political administrative subdistricts

29 Township and Range – The cultural landscape of Garden City, Iowa reflects the Township and Range system. Townships are 6x6 miles and section lines are every 1 mile.

30 Metes and Bounds Survey Natural features used to demarcate irregular parcels of land Used commonly along the eastern seaboard Rivers, lakes, streams, mountains

31 Tennessee’s 3rd Surveyor’s District using Metes and Bounds to describe the plot

32 Long-Lot Survey System Long, narrow unit block stretching back from a road, river, or canal Central and Western Europe, Brazil, Argentina, Southern Louisiana, Texas

33 Longlot Survey System The cultural landscape of Burgandy, France reflects the Longlot Survey system, as land is divided into long, narrow parcels. French Long Lot agricultural fields in Louisiana

34 Dominant Land Survey Patterns in the US

35 Agricultural Villages Linear Village Cluster Village (nucleated) Round Village (rundling) Walled Village Grid Village

36 Village Forms

37 Functional Differentiation within Villages Cultural landscape of a village reflects: – Social stratification – Differentiation of buildings – Cultural norms – Economic way of life – Levels of Interdependence

38 Stilt village in Cambodia Buildings look alike, but serve different purposes.

39 Farm in Minnesota each building serves a different purpose

40 Agribusiness and Vertical Integration Many different types of agribusinesses work together to market the products of U.S. agriculture. The marketing process starts when the producer sells grain, soybeans, cotton, livestock, dairy, eggs, poultry, fruit, nuts, vegetables or other products. From there the job is taken over by other agribusinesses that perform functions that are necessary to deliver the product to a consumer. The process ends when the consumer buys a ready-to-use product such as a steak, a loaf of bread, a pizza, a bag of apples, a can of peas, a shirt or a pound of cheese. Commodity - This refers to any product that is essentially undifferentiated. This means that there is no difference in the product regardless of which company you buy from. Milk is generally said to be a commodity. As long as the product meets the health guidelines for milk, there is really no difference between producers or sellers. Trade goods, goods -- (articles of commerce). 1.Oil/Petroleum Products 2.Coffee 3.Steel and Infrastructure 4.Gold 5.Wheat

41 CONAGRA PRODUCTS

42 Starbucks Coffee as a Commodity in Vertical Integration Starbucks practices a unique form of vertical integration. They control the coffee that is grown (Arabica). They negotiate a price of the coffee they purchase from individual farmers (market price) and farmers are given incentives for high quality beans. Roasting is done using very specific, unique methods by Starbucks. Starbucks and Fair Trade e42M&feature=relmfu


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