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Maxime Rousseaux PhD Candidate, David Park Lab.  Know your poster – where everything is.  Rehearse. Set time goal range (i.e. 10-15 min)  On the day.

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Presentation on theme: "Maxime Rousseaux PhD Candidate, David Park Lab.  Know your poster – where everything is.  Rehearse. Set time goal range (i.e. 10-15 min)  On the day."— Presentation transcript:

1 Maxime Rousseaux PhD Candidate, David Park Lab

2  Know your poster – where everything is.  Rehearse. Set time goal range (i.e. 10-15 min)  On the day of, you will probably speak faster than what you had prepared for (minus questions) so try to anticipate that.  Get feedback from co-authors.  Different set of eyes (inherent/systematic errors)  Get permission from outside collaborators to present their data.  If for a scientific conference: They can put the abstract on their CV. Make sure they agree with it (GIVE PLENTLY OF TIME FOR REVIEW!)

3  Prepare questions that you think they might ask (ask co- authors for help!)  SPECIFIC questions (mostly experimental): Why did you do TUNEL staining as opposed to Fluorojade? What do the multiple bands represent in that blot?  BROAD questions (theoretical/out of the box): Why study spinal cord injury? What are the clinical applications of your research? Could this method be applied to any other form of neuronal injury? What if your hypothesis is wrong?  Most importantly, DON’T ANSWER all of these questions while presenting (although tempting). 1) They will increase your time and set you off on tangents and 2) The examiner will ask different questions that you might not be prepared for.

4  Dress appropriately (first impressions do matter…)  Speak clearly and enthusiastically  Give a very brief intro about yourself. Don’t just start dictating your project  PACE yourself (timed pauses can have a great effect on information retention for examiners)  Know your audience  i.e. if they are pros @ muscular dystrophy research, perhaps less delving on what a Z-band is…  Timeline  Hit the major points that you want, it isn’t necessary to go over absolutely everything in the poster.  Leave out the details if possible and home in on the important results  Questions:  Actively listen to them (Trick: Repeat by paraphrasing to see whether you understand the question). If you don’t understand, ask them to clarify.  Avoid verbal diarrhea!

5  3 steps?  Read and find out within 10-30 seconds whether the poster is of interest to you  If yes, gather the most information that can describe a proper picture in about 5 min (suggestion: read abstract and look at figures)  If you have questions or want a run through, then either go over it with a fine brush or ask for clarification from presenter.  Sharing/Collaboration:  It’s a two-way street. Good to offer help but try and get some help in exchange.  Speak to your supervisor before hand (avoid scooping?)  Handouts/Pictures are great to bring back from conferences.

6  Evaluator ½ way through presentation  Disagreements: Breathe…relax…and find common ground  Nobody @ your poster. What do you do?  Evaluator that doesn’t want a run-through and just reads your poster…


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