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1 Allen M. Weiss, PE, LC SESCO Lighting 1133 W. Morse Blvd. Winter Park Florida 32789 407-629-6100

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Presentation on theme: "1 Allen M. Weiss, PE, LC SESCO Lighting 1133 W. Morse Blvd. Winter Park Florida 32789 407-629-6100"— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Allen M. Weiss, PE, LC SESCO Lighting 1133 W. Morse Blvd. Winter Park Florida Florida’s Energy Code 2007 Florida Building Code-Including 2007 Energy Glitch Amendments Effective March 1 st, 2009 Chapter Commercial Lighting Compliance Commercial Lighting Compliance Florida Energy Code

2 2 SESCO Lighting is a registered Provider with The American Institute of Architects Continuing Education Systems. Credit earned on completion of this program will be reported to CES records for AIA members. Certificates of Completion for non-AIA are available on request. This program is registered with the AIA/CES for continuing professional education. As such, it does not include content that may be deemed or construed to be an approval or endorsement by the AIA of any material of construction or any method or manner of handling, using, distributing, or dealing in any material or product. Questions related to specific materials, methods, and services will be addressed at the conclusion of this presentation. Florida Energy Code

3 3 SESCO Lighting is a registered Provider with DBPR, the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulations. Continuing Education Credit earned on completion of this program will be reported to DBPR records for Registered Landscape Architects, Registered Architects, Registered Interior Designers, and licensed Electrical Contractors. Certificates of Completion will be provided for all in attendance for the entire seminar. This program is registered with DBPR for continuing professional education. As such, it does not include content that may be deemed or construed to be an approval or endorsement by the DBPR of any material of construction or any method or manner of handling, using, distributing, or dealing in any material or product. Questions related to specific materials, methods, and services will be addressed at the conclusion of this presentation. Florida Energy Code

4 4 Allen M. Weiss P.E, LC is approved and authorized as a Continuing Education Provider by the Florida Board of Professional Engineers (# ), offering “Area of Practice” courses. In addition, Mr. Weiss is an employee of the Sesco Lighting Company and is offering this lecture to both the attendees and to Sesco Lighting on a “Pro-Bono” basis. Every attempt has been made to keep this lecture completely generic. At no time during this lecture will products represented by Sesco Lighting be discussed, either by manufacturer’s name, product name or product part number. Florida Energy Code

5 5 Learning Objectives Florida Energy Code Students will; Obtain a working knowledge of Chapter 13 of the Florida Building Code. Compare and evaluate power limiting (watts/sq.ft) requirements pertaining to new, renovated and existing commercial building lighting. Compare and evaluate control requirements pertaining to new, renovated and existing commercial building lighting. Identify and differentiate between indoor and outdoor lighting energy related requirements.

6 6 History of the Code Florida Energy Code  In 2001 the Energy Conservation and Protection Act mandated that all states adopt a commercial energy code (ASHRAE or something more stringent for Energy standards)  In 2001 Florida adopted only the Power Allowance portion of ASHRAE 90.1  In 2004 Florida adopted their own code, calling it “The Florida Building Code, Chapter 13-Florida Energy Efficiency for Building Construction 2004” (which remains very similar to ASHRAE 90.1). This code was expanded to include both the Power Allowance and the Lighting Control sections  In 2007 the code was revised and published but not yet adopted  On March 1 st of 2009, the revised (2007) Florida Energy code was adopted complete with the 2009 Glitch amendments in their legislative format  This is the Law !!!

7 7 Current Codes Florida Energy Code

8 8 Intent & Scope of Energy Code Florida Energy Code The provisions of The Florida Building Code - Chapter 13, Florida Energy Efficiency for Building Construction shall regulate: (1)Building Envelopes (2)Energy Systems: Mechanical, Electrical, & Illumination Systems for -New building construction -Additions -Alterations -Any change in building configuration

9 9 Florida Energy Code - Sections Florida Energy Code This code is a statewide code and shall not be made more stringent or lenient by local government. Ch.13 Sections: 1.Fenestrations (Glazing) 2.Walls 3.Doors 4.Roofs/Ceilings 5.Floors 6.Air Infiltration 7.Space Cooling Systems 8.Space Heating Systems 9.Ventilation 10.Air Distribution Systems 11.Pumps & Piping 12.Water Heating Systems 13.Electric Power 14.Motors 15.Lighting

10 10 New Construction & Additions Florida Energy Code The provisions of this chapter apply to the Lighting Power Density and the Control requirements of: -All commercial occupancy buildings of any size -Additions to existing commercial occupancy buildings -Multiple-family residential buildings 4 stories or more above grade -Interior & Exterior Lighting Alterations & Renovations Generally treated as New Construction Replacement of lighting systems must comply New or replacement control devices must comply

11 : Applicable Areas Florida Energy Code This section of Chapter 13 shall apply to the following: 1.Interior Spaces of buildings; 2.Exterior building features, including facades, illuminated roofs, architectural features, entrances, exits, loading docks, and illuminated canopies; and 3. Exterior building grounds lighting provided through the building’s electrical service.

12 : Exempt Areas Florida Energy Code 1.Emergency lighting that is automatically off during normal building operation (ex: emergency lighting bug-eyes, recessed ceiling drop down emergency units, etc.) 2.Lighting within living units (ex: individual condo units) 3.Lighting that is specifically designated as required by a health or life safety statute, ordinance, or regulation (ex: NFPA 101 – Life Safety states stairs must have 10fc of lighting and lighting for that purpose would be exempt.) 4.Decorative gas lighting systems 5. Historic buildings, Federally Mandated buildings, and buildings with a total power density of <1W/ft 2 * The following are exempt from both the Power Allowance & Controls…

13 13 Mandatory: Types of Controls Florida Energy Code AB.1.1 Automatic Lighting Shutoff Required if building is over 5,000 ft 2 Required to control lighting in all spaces (unless exempt) (3) Options for Controls: 1.A scheduled basis using time-of-day operated control device that turns lighting off at specific programmed times (Dimming or Relay System with Low Voltage Switches in spaces) - controls ≤ 25,000ft 2 or not more than (1) floor 2.Occupant Sensor (max setting of 30 min.) 3.Signal from another control or alarm device that indicates the area is unoccupied * You can mix and match the above techniques

14 14 Florida Energy Code Clarification per the DOE: -A building is clarified as a “Building area surrounded by exterior walls or fire walls.” Ex: If you have a 10,000 square foot strip mall, with (5) 2,000 square foot tenants, and there are fire walls in between each tenant, you DO NOT need to meet the automatic shutoff requirements for each tenant. Mandatory: Types of Controls Ex: If you have a 10,000 square foot, 3-story office building, with (4) 2,000 square foot tenants and 2,000 square feet of common area you DO need to have a control system for the tenants and the building common spaces. The following interpretation is per the U.S. Department of Energy, Building Energy Codes Program available online at: * Per the DOE, The intent of the code is to apply to business entities where the whole building control is practical (however, up to local electrical plan reviewer interpretation)

15 15 Mandatory: Control Exceptions Florida Energy Code AB.1.1 Automatic Lighting Controls: Exceptions: a.Lighting intended for 24-hour operation. (ex: 24-hour pharmacy, 24-hour shift manufacturing facilities, etc.) b.Lighting in spaces where patient care is rendered. (ex: hospital rooms, assisted living suites, etc.) c.Spaces where an automatic shutoff would endanger the safety or security of the room or building occupant(s). (ex: mechanical and electrical equipment room, operating room, dental suites, workshops, etc.)

16 16Florida Energy Code AB.1.2 Space Control: Each space enclosed by ceiling-height partitions shall have at least one control device to independently control the general lighting within a space. Each control shall be capable of overriding any time-of-day scheduled shut-off control for no more than 4 hours In ≤10,000 ft 2 spaces, each control can serve a max of 2,500 ft 2 In > 10,000 ft 2 spaces, each control can serve a max of 10,000 ft 2 Mandatory: Indiv. Space Controls

17 17Florida Energy Code AB.1.2 Space Control: Controls can be activated: Automatically by sensing an occupant (oc. sensor) or Manually by an occupant (oc. sensor with an override button or a low voltage “smart” switch tied to a relay panel) Each manual device shall be readily accessible and located so the occupants can see the controlled lighting. Exceptions: Remote locations are permitted where security or safety are a concern Remote control must be labeled to identify the controlled lighting Remote control must have an indicator pilot light on or next to the device Mandatory: Indiv. Space Controls

18 18 Mandatory: Indiv. Space Controls Florida Energy Code AB.1.2 Space Control: Occupancy Sensors, that turn lights off within 30 min. of an occupant leaving the space are required in the following specific spaces: (1)Certain Classrooms (2)Conference/Meeting Rooms (3)Employee Lunch & Break Rooms * Reasoning: Because these spaces are rarely used, an occupancy sensor will save more energy than another type of control If you put an occupancy sensor in these spaces, these spaces are not required to be connected to other automatic lighting shutoff controls. This requirement does not apply to spaces with multi-scene control, shop classrooms, laboratory classrooms, and preschool through twelfth grade classrooms. (They are treated as any other space & require (1) of the (3) types of mandatory controls!!!) Exceptions:

19 19Florida Energy Code AB.1.3 Additional Control: Controls are required in the following cases: Hotel and motel guest rooms lighting. Hotel and motel guest rooms and guest suites shall have a master control device at the main room entry that controls all permanently installed luminaires and switched receptacles. Mandatory: Additional Controls (ex: A card reader that requires you to insert your card when you enter the room in order to turn the lights on. Or a master switch which overrides all other switches in the space. )

20 20 Mandatory: Additional Controls Florida Energy Code AB.1.3 Additional Control: Separate controls are required in the following cases: (if additional to ambient lighting) Display or accent lighting. Case Lighting. Lighting in cases used for display purposes shall have a separate control device. Task Lighting. Supplemental task lighting shall have a control device integral to the luminaires or be controlled by a wall mounted control device provided the control device is readily accessible and located so that the occupant can see the controlled lighting. Non-visual lighting. Lighting for nonvisual applications, such as plant growth and food warming. Demonstration Lighting. Lighting equipment that is for sale or for demonstration in lighting education.

21 21 Mandatory: Exterior Ltg Controls Florida Energy Code AB.1.4 Exterior Lighting Control: Photocell or astronomical time switch with 10 hour memory for dusk-to-dawn lighting (or) Lighting not designated as dusk-to-dawn shall be controlled only with an astronomical time switch with 10 hour memory Exceptions: Covered vehicle entrances Exits from buildings or parking structures where required for safety, security, or eye adaptation

22 22 Mandatory: Exterior Ltg Efficiency Florida Energy Code AB.2 Exterior Building Grounds Lighting: Exterior Lighting > 100 Watts must also be > 60 lumens/watt Exception: the luminaire is controlled by a motion sensor or is exempt under Section or Section AB.1.3)

23 23 Mandatory: Tandem Wiring Florida Energy Code AB.3 Tandem Wiring: This section of the code must only be adhered to if Magnetic ballasts are used (T12 lamps) because magnetic ballasts work best if driving two lamps, not one One of several exceptions to this section of the code is to use an electronic ballast Mandatory: Exits AB.4 Exit Signs: Internally illuminated exit signs shall not exceed 5 watts per face.

24 24 Prescriptive: 2 Methods Florida Energy Code This chapter contains two methods to comply with the prescriptive requirements of the code: Method A: Whole Building Performance Method Method B: Building Envelope Trade-off Method Question: Who chooses which Method to use? Answer: Typically the Mechanical Engineer running the EnergyGuage FLA/COM software program * Energy compliance printouts from EnergyGuage FLA/COM are required by Florida to be submitted during the permitting stage

25 25 Prescriptive: Interior Lighting Florida Energy Code AB.5 Interior lighting power, Scope The interior lighting power allowance for a building or a separately metered or permitted portion of a building shall be determined by the: Space by Space Method – described in section B.1 Trade-Offs of interior lighting power allowance among portions of the building for which a different method of calculation has been used are not permitted Installed interior lighting power must be < than the Allowed interior lighting power

26 26Florida Energy Code AB.5.1 Installed Interior Lighting Power Exceptions: - The 15 Items listed in the next few slides shall NOT be included in BOTH the lighting power allowance and the installed interior lighting power - However… - the lighting listed must be in addition to the general lighting - the lighting listed must be independently controlled Prescriptive: Interior Lighting

27 27Florida Energy Code Exceptions: 1.Display or accent lighting that is an essential element for the function performed in galleries, museums, monuments. 2.Lighting that is integral to equipment or instrumentation and is installed by its manufacturer. 3.Lighting specifically designed for use only during medical or dental procedures and lighting integral to medical equipment. 4.Lighting integral to both open and glass enclosed refrigerator and freezer cases. 5.Lighting integral to food warming and food preparation equipment. 6.Lighting for plant growth or maintenance. 7.Lighting in spaces specifically designed for use by the visually impaired. Prescriptive: Exempt Interior Ltg.

28 28Florida Energy Code 8.Lighting in retail display windows, provided the display area is enclosed by ceiling-height partitions. (ex: Macy’s store windows in NYC) 9.Lighting in interior spaces that have been specifically designated as a registered historic landmark. (ex: Inside Independence Hall in Philly) 10.Lighting that is an integral part of advertising or directional signage. (ex: lighting within a sign that is purchased for the building) 11.Exit signs. 12.Lighting that is for sale or lighting educational demonstration systems. 13.Lighting for theatrical purposes, including performance, stage, and film, and video production. 14.Lighting for television broadcasting in sporting activity areas. 15.Casino gaming areas. Prescriptive: Exempt Interior Ltg.

29 29Florida Energy Code AB.5.1 Installed Interior Lighting Power & Appendix B: When calculating watts, you must include ALL power used by the luminaire Lamps Ballasts/Drivers Current Regulators Control Devices Prescriptive: Installed Interior Ltg. Screw Based Medium Socket Incandescents & Halogens– maximum labeled wattage of the luminaire Luminaires with Ballasts, Drivers or Transformers – max. UL labeled wattage of lamp/ballast/driver combination or transformer Line Voltage Track – max. wattage of luminaires in the system or a min. of 30W per linear foot (whichever is greater) Low Voltage Track – wattage of the transformer supplying the system Exception: if two systems are in a space and you can only turn one on at a time

30 30Florida Energy Code Prescriptive: Calculation Methods B.1 Space-By- Space Method of Calculating Interior Lighting Power Allowance (LPA) 1.Determine the appropriate building type from table B.1 2.For each space enclosed by partitions 80 % or greater than the ceiling height determine the floor area 3.Determine the LPA by using the columns designated space-by-space. 4.Multiply the floor area (s) times the allowed Lighting Power Density (LPD) for the space type that most closely represents the proposed use of the space 5.The product is the LPA for the space 6.The interior LPA is the sum of LPA’s for all spaces Note: You can go to the IESNA website to see how ASHRAE and IESNA came up with the LPD for each space. Note: Tradeoffs of Spaces are Allowed (see B.1.4) provided that the total installed interior lighting power does not exceed the interior lighting power allowance.

31 31Florida Energy Code Prescriptive: Calculation Methods Table B.1- Lighting Power Densities (LPD) Using the Space-By Space Method Common Space Types LPD (W/ft²) Common Space Types LPD (W/ft²) Office – enclosed1.1 for Gymnasium0.4 Office – open plan1.1 for Exercise Center0.3 Conference/Meeting/Multipurpose1.3 for Convention Center0.7 Classroom/Lecture/Training1.4 for Penitentiary0.7 for Penitentiary1.3 for Religious Buildings1.7 Lobby1.3 for Sports Arena0.4 for Hotel1.1 for Performing Arts Theatre2.6 for Performing Arts Theatre3.3 for Motion Picture Theatre1.2 for Motion Picture Theatre1.1 for Transportation0.5 Audience/seating area0.9Atrium-First three floors0.6

32 32Florida Energy Code Prescriptive: Calculation Methods Common Space Types LPD (W/ft²) Common Space Types LPD (W/ft²) Atrium- each additional floor0.2 Laboratory1.4 Lounge/Recreation1.2 Restrooms0.9 for Hospital0.8 Dressing/Locker/Fitting room0.6 Dining Area0.9Corridor/Transition0.5 for Penitentiary1.3 for Hospital1.0 for Hotel1.3 for Manufacturing facility0.5 for Motel1.2 Stairs - active0.6 for Bar lounge/Leisure dining1.4Active storage0.8 for Family dining2.1 for Hospital0.9 Food preparation1.2Inactive storage0.3 Table B.1- Continued Lighting Power Densities (LPD) Using the Space-By Space Method

33 33Florida Energy Code Prescriptive: Calculation Methods Common Space Types LPD (W/ft²) Building Specific Space Types LPD (W/ft²) for Museum0.8 Judges chambers1.3 Electrical/Mechanical1.5 Fire stations Workshop1.9 Fire station engine room0.8 Building Specific Space Types LPD (W/ft² Sleeping quarters0.3 Gymnasium/Exercise centerPost Office – sorting area1.2 Playing area1.4Convention center – exhibit space1.3 Exercise area0.9 Library Courthouse/Police station/Penitentiary Card file & cataloguing1.1 Courtroom1.9 Stacks1.7 Confinement cells0.9 Reading area1.2 Table B.1- Continued Lighting Power Densities (LPD) Using the Space-By Space Method

34 34Florida Energy Code Prescriptive: Calculation Methods Building Specific Space Types LPD (W/ft²) Building Specific Space Types LPD (W/ft²) Hospital Physical therapy0.9 Emergency2.7 Radiology0.4 Recovery0.8 Laundry/Washing0.6 Nurse station1.0 Automotive/Service/Repair0.7 Exam/Treatment1.5Manufacturing Pharmacy1.2 Low bay (<25 ft floor to ceiling height)1.2 Patient room0.7 High bay (>25 ft floor to ceiling height)1.7 Operating room2.2 Detailed manufacturing2.1 Nursery0.6 Equipment room1.2 Medical supply1.4 Control room0.5 Table B.1- Continued Lighting Power Densities (LPD) Using the Space-By Space Method

35 35Florida Energy Code Prescriptive: Calculation Methods Building Specific Space Types LPD (W/ft²) Building Specific Space Types LPD (W/ft²) Dormitory – Living quarters1.1 Mall concourse1.7 MuseumSports arena General exhibition1.0 Ring sports area2.7 Restoration1.7 Court sports area2.3 Bank/Office –banking activity area1.5 Indoor playing field area1.4 Religious buildings Warehouse Worship – pulpit, choir2.4 Fine material Storage1.4 Fellowship hall0.9 Medium/bulky material storage0.9 Retail (for accent lighting see Sec. 415.B.2)Parking garage – garage area0.2 Sales area²1.7Transportation Table B.1- Continued Lighting Power Densities (LPD) Using the Space-By Space Method

36 36Florida Energy Code Prescriptive: Calculation Methods Building Specific Space Types LPD (W/ft²) Building Specific Space Types LPD (W/ft²) Airport – concourse Air/Train/Bus –Baggage area Terminal – Ticket counter Table B.1- Continued Lighting Power Densities (LPD) Using the Space-By Space Method In cases where both a common space type and a building specific space type are listed, the building specific space type shall apply.

37 37Florida Energy Code Prescriptive: Exterior Power Allowances Exterior Building Lighting Power Densities See enclosed table AB.2.2 The upper part of the table includes tradable surfaces. An example would be if you used less than the allowable 0.15 W/ft² for the Parking Lots, you could use the left over power in your walkways or possible the outdoor stairways. The lower part of the table includes non tradable surfaces. Each application can be used only for the specific application and cannot be traded between surfaces or with other exterior lighting. It is a use it or lose it application. The total exterior lighting power allowance would be the sum of all individual power allowances plus a bonus of 5%

38 38Florida Energy Code Prescriptive: Exterior Power Allowances Applications Lighting Power Densities Tradable Surfaces (Lighting power densities for uncovered parking areas, building grounds, building entrances, and exits, canopies and overhangs and outdoor sales areas may be traded.) Uncovered Parking Areas Parking Lots & Drives0.15W/ft² Building Grounds Walkways less than 10 feet wide1.0W/linear foot Walkways 10 feet wide or greater, Plaza areas, Special Feature areas 0.2W/ft² Stairways1.0W/ft² Building Entrances and Exits Main entries30W/linear foot of door width Other doors 20W/linear foot of door width Canopies and Overhangs Canopies (free standing and attached and overhangs 1.25W/ft²

39 39Florida Energy Code Prescriptive: Exterior Power Allowances Applications Lighting Power Densities Tradable Surfaces (Lighting power densities for uncovered parking areas, building grounds, building entrances, and exits, canopies and overhangs and outdoor sales areas may be traded.) Outdoor Sales Open areas (including vehicle sales lots)0.5W/ft² Street frontage for vehicle sales lots in addition to “open area” allowance 20W/linear foot Non Tradable Surfaces (Lighting power density calculations for the following applications can be used only for the specific application and cannot be traded between surfaces or with other exterior lighting. The following allowances are in addition to any allowance otherwise permitted in the “Tradable Surfaces” section of this table. Source: Table 9.4.5, ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Building Facades 0.2W/ft² for each illuminated wall or surface or 5.0W/linear foot for each illuminated wall or surface length Automated teller machines and night depositories 270W per location plus 90W per additional ATM per location Entrances and gatehouse inspection stations at guarded facilities 1.25W/ft² of uncovered area (covered areas are included in the “Canopies and Overhangs” section of “Tradable Surfaces”) Loading areas for law enforcement, fire, ambulance and other emergency service vehicles 0.5W/ft² of uncovered area (covered areas are included in the “Canopies and Overhangs” section of “Tradable Surfaces”) Drive-up windows at fast food restaurants400W per drive-through Parking near 24 hour retail entrances800W per main entry

40 40Florida Energy Code Prescriptive: Exterior Power Exemptions Exceptions: - The (9) items listed in the next few slides shall NOT be included in the exterior lighting power allowance - However… - the lighting listed must be independently controlled (a)Specialized signal, directional, and marker lighting associates with transportation; (b)Advertising signage or directional signage; (c)Lighting that is integral to equipment or instrumentation and is installed by its manufacturer; (d)Lighting for theatrical purposes, including performance, stage, film, and video production

41 41Florida Energy Code Prescriptive: Exterior Power Exemptions (e)Lighting for athletic playing areas; (ex: a football and soccer field) (f)Temporary lighting; (g)Lighting for industrial production, material handling, transportation sites and associated storage areas; (ex: A concrete facility that produces tilt-up walls outside and ships them out) (h)Theme elements in theme/amusement parks; (ex: Disney World) (i)Lighting used to highlight features of public monuments and registered historic landmark structures or buildings. (ex: lighting the Washington Monument in D.C., lighting the American Flag)

42 Florida Energy Code42 THANK YOU FOR YOUR TIME ! Course Title: The Florida Energy Code– SESCO Lecture #8 Provider: Allen Weiss / Shayna Bramley AIA/CES Provider # / Course #: L140 / SES8 FL DBPR-Arch Provider # / Course #: 8190 / AR FL DBPR-Land. Arch Provider # / Course #: N/A FL DBPR-Int. Des. Provider # / Course #: 8190 / FL DBPR-Elec.Contr. Provider # / Course #: / IDCEC (ASID, IIDA) Course #: 7898 FBPE Provider #: ASLA#: Coming soon SESCO Lighting 1133 W. Morse Blvd. Suite 100 Winter Park Florida Any Questions? This concludes the American Institute of Architects and DBPR Continuing Education Systems Program


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