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Teaching Excellence Showcase November 16, 2007. Are We Doing Anything Important in Class Today? Designing Effective Syllabi and Outlines

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Presentation on theme: "Teaching Excellence Showcase November 16, 2007. Are We Doing Anything Important in Class Today? Designing Effective Syllabi and Outlines"— Presentation transcript:

1 Teaching Excellence Showcase November 16, 2007

2 Are We Doing Anything Important in Class Today? Designing Effective Syllabi and Outlines

3 This module covers: 1. what a syllabus is, 2. how syllabi can aid student learning in the classroom, 3. where to begin in writing an effective syllabus, 4. what to include in an effective syllabus, and 5. online resources for building effective syllabi for the university classroom.

4 What is it? syl·la·bus P Pronunciation Key (s l -b s) n. pl. syl·la·bus·es or syl·la·bi (-b ) Pronunciation Key An outline or a summary of the main points of a text, lecture, or course of study. [Medieval Latin, probably alteration (influenced by Greek sullambanein, to put together), of Latin sillybus, parchment label from Greek sillubos.]

5 What is it? Wikipedia Syllabus (plural syllabi or syllabuses) is a document with an outline and summary of topics to be covered in a course. It is often either set out by an exam board, or prepared by the professor who teaches the course, and is usually given to each student during the first class session. A syllabus usually contains specific information about the course, such as information on how, where and when to contact the lecturer and teaching assistants; an outline of what will be covered in the course; a schedule of test dates and the due dates for assignments; the grading policy for the course; specific classroom rules; etc.documentoutlinesummary courseexamprofessorteaching assistantstestgrading policy

6 What is it? Wikipedia (continued) Within many courses concluding in an exam, syllabuses are used to ensure consistency between schools and that all teachers know what must be taught and what is not required. Exams can only test based on information included in the syllabus.

7 Aid Student Learning

8 Why bother? Students learn better when they understand what they are expected to learn and how that learning will be assessed.

9 Where to Begin Journey What are the rules? Where are the pit stops? Who is driving? Are we taking turns?

10 Where to Begin Journey What do you want to teach? What expectations do you have for the students? Where do you want to end?

11 Where to Begin Course Development: Modules Units Learning Objects

12 Where to Begin Goals vs. Outcomes: General Course Goals/Objectives Specific Student Learning Outcomes

13 What to Include 20Preparation.doc s/index.html

14 What to Include

15 IDES 3700 Interior Design Visual Presentations 1 Human Sciences Department Interior Design Program IDES MW 9:10-11:40 IDES MW12:40- 3:10 EHSA 020

16 IDES 3700 Interior Design Visual Presentations 1 Deborah Belcher, Allied Member ASID, IDEC Associate Professor Registered Interior Designer State of Tennessee #156 Office: EHSA 222 Teaching Schedule: IDES MW 9:10-11:40 IDES MW12:40- 3:10 HSC M 8:00- 8:55 IDES TR11:20- 1:50 IDES TR 2:40- 5:10 Office Hours: TR 9:00-11:00 By Appointment Phone:

17 IDES 3700 Interior Design Visual Presentations 1 Course Description: Interior rendering techniques, perspective drawing, sketching, and operation and care of equipment necessary in the effective communication of design solutions. Three credits. Five hours per week. Prerequisites: IDES 2700, IDES 2710 and Art Five hours per week. Renderings :

18 IDES 3700 Interior Design Visual Presentations 1 Course Content: Students will be able to: 1.sketch one point and two point 3-D drawings, 2.translate floor plans into perspective drawings, 3.render interior perspectives, 4.combine mediums for effective communication of design solutions, and 5.operate and take care of equipment used in developing a professional presentation. Renderings :

19 IDES 3700 Interior Design Visual Presentations 1 Course Topics: 1.3-D sketching techniques 2.Perspective drawings a. 1 point and 2 point 3.Reproducing drawings 4.Media a. graphite (pencil) b. pen and ink c. color pencils/ pastels d. color markers Renderings :

20 IDES 3700 Interior Design Visual Presentations 1 Course Format: The class format will combine appropriate lectures, studio practice, and open review sessions. Lectures and demonstrations will be organized to present the content as a framework for the studio section. Renderings :

21 IDES 3700 Interior Design Visual Presentations 1 What does accreditation mean? –Accreditation is a process of self- evaluation and peer assessment that promotes achievement of high academic standards, while making education more responsive to students’ and society's needs. –Standards developed by interior design practitioners and educators and concern for continued growth and development are central to accreditation. –Accreditation also sends a message to the public that the institution and/or its programs have accepted and are fulfilling a commitment to educational quality.

22 IDES 3700 Interior Design Visual Presentations 1 Standard 1. Curriculum Structure The curriculum is structured to facilitate and advance student learning. Indicators a) The curriculum MUST follow a logical sequence. b) Course content MUST increase in degree of difficulty. c) Significant concepts MUST be interrelated and reinforced throughout the curriculum. d) Projects MUST demonstrate variety and complexity in type, size, and scope. e) The curriculum MUST provide exposure to a variety of business, organizational, and familial structures (for example, for-profit, non-profit, publicly vs. privately held, hierarchical, flat, co-housing, nuclear and extended family).

23 IDES 3700 Interior Design Visual Presentations 1 Standard 1. Curriculum Structure (continued) The teaching and learning methods MUST incorporate: f) the experience of team approaches to design solutions. g) experiences that provide interaction with multiple disciplines (for example, code specialists, engineers, architects, artists, behaviorists) representing a variety of points of view and perspectives on design problems. The program MUST provide: h) interaction with practicing professionals (for example, as jurors, project critics, guest lecturers, mentors). i) opportunities for design work experience (for example, internship, co-op, shadowing, or other experiences that familiarize students with the culture and environment of the professional studio and professional practice).

24 IDES 3700 Interior Design Visual Presentations 1 Standard 1. Curriculum Structure (continued) –Guidance: Use the indicators to determine whether the standard is met. Program inputs and outcomes are evaluated to determine compliance with this standard. Analyze the curriculum, syllabi, project descriptions or briefs, handouts, and blank exams. Review student work and its progression, variety, and complexity. Do not focus on the work of individual students, but look at the student work as a whole. In other words, take a broad view and seek the preponderance of evidence. If the standard has been met, student work will include a variety of project types and the work will progress in complexity and degree of difficulty.

25 IDES 3700 Interior Design Visual Presentations 1 Standard 3. Design Fundamentals Students have a foundation in the fundamentals of art and design; theories of design, green design, and human behavior; and discipline-related history. Indicators –Student work MUST demonstrate understanding of design fundamentals including: a) design elements (for example, space, line, mass, shape, texture) and principles (for example, scale, proportion, balance, rhythm, emphasis, harmony, variety). b) color principles, theories, and systems (for example, additive and subtractive color; color- mixing; hue, value, and intensity; the relationship of light and color). c) theories of design and design composition (for example, functionalism, Gestalt). d) principles of lighting design (for example, color, quality, sources, use).

26 IDES 3700 Interior Design Visual Presentations 1 Standard 3. Design Fundamentals (continued) –Student work MUST demonstrate understanding of theories of human behavior in interior environments: e) human factors (for example, ergonomics, anthropometry/anthropometrics) f) the relationship between human behavior and the built environment.

27 IDES 3700 Interior Design Visual Presentations 1 Standard 3. Design Fundamentals (continued) –g) Student work MUST demonstrate understanding of principles and theories of sustainability. –Student work MUST demonstrate understanding of the history of: h) art. i) architecture. j) interiors. k) furnishings.

28 IDES 3700 Interior Design Visual Presentations 1 Standard 3. Design Fundamentals (continued) –Guidance: Use the indicators to determine whether the standard is met. Program inputs and outcomes are evaluated to determine compliance with this standard. Review the curriculum to determine where these topics are covered. Review syllabi, project descriptions, handouts, and blank exams in conjunction with applicable student work. Do not focus on the work of individual students, but look at the student work as a whole. In other words, take a broad view and seek the preponderance of evidence. If the standard has been met, student work will demonstrate the appropriate understanding.

29 IDES 3700 Interior Design Visual Presentations 1 Standard 5. Communication Students communicate effectively. –Indicators –Student work MUST demonstrate competence in: a) drafting and lettering, both manual and computer-aided techniques. b) illustrative sketching. c) presentation of color, materials, and furnishings (for example, sample boards, collages, mock-ups, digital representations). –Students MUST: d) express ideas clearly in oral presentations and critiques.

30 IDES 3700 Interior Design Visual Presentations 1 Standard 5. Communication (continued) –Student work MUST demonstrate the ability to: f) render by any medium, manual or computer-generated, that successfully communicates the design intent. g) communicate 3-dimensional space and form, such as in perspectives, paralines, and models (computer-generated or manual). –Student work SHOULD demonstrate the ability to: h) apply the metric system to design work. i) communicate through alternative presentation techniques (for example, audio, electronic, film, photography, slides, video).

31 IDES 3700 Interior Design Visual Presentations 1 Standard 5. Communication (continued) –Guidance: Use the indicators to determine whether the standard is met. Program outcomes are evaluated to determine compliance with the standard. Evaluate sketches, drawings, and other presentation materials. Review student reports and research papers. Do not focus on the work of individual students, but look at the student work as a whole. In other words, take a broad view and seek the preponderance of evidence. Interview students, observe presentations or videotapes, and review jurists’ evaluations. If the standard is met, students and their work must demonstrate the ability to communicate effectively.

32 IDES 3700 Interior Design Visual Presentations 1 Course Requirements: Students will be required to complete the following demonstrating not less than minimum competency of requisite knowledge and skills in order to receive credit for this course: A. attendance, punctuality, participation, and preparedness B. sketch book C. required number of studio exercises/experiences D. required assignments E. required number of projects Renderings :

33 IDES 3700 Interior Design Visual Presentations 1 A. Attendance, Punctuality, Participation, and Preparedness Class attendance, punctuality participation and preparedness is required. 1. Attendance will be taken at the professor's discretion. No more than three (3) absences will be permitted during the semester. After three absences, one point will be removed from your final grade per each additional absence. "Excused" absences beyond the three permitted are not accepted. 2. Punctuality is expected. If you arrive early, get prepared for studio and begin working on your assignments. You must be in the room ready for lecture and /or studio when the role is called. Tardiness will be considered an absence and graded accordingly. Renderings :

34 IDES 3700 Interior Design Visual Presentations 1 A. Attendance, Punctuality, Participation, and Preparedness 3. If you are absent, it is your responsibility to contact a peer in class and request notes, handouts, assignments, directions to a field trip, changes in the Course Outline, etc. You must be prepared for the next class period with the appropriate materials, equipment, and completed assignments. 4. To maintain a positive, professional atmosphere within the studio, you are required to turn off all cell phones, beepers, and other electronic equipment that might interrupt the class session. Renderings :

35 IDES 3700 Interior Design Visual Presentations 1 A. Attendance, Punctuality, Participation, and Preparedness 5. Participation with a positive attitude in all activities is also expected. Coming to class and working on other projects or school assignments will be considered an un-productive studio day and will be graded as an absence. 6. Students are expected to be prepared for class and to bring necessary materials such as course workbook, texts, designated assignments, drawings, appropriate supporting materials, and basic drawing equipment to class each day. Students are also expected to be prepared for pin-up, critique sessions (you must bring push pens) and for turning in exercises (you must bring paper clips). Special tools and/or materials needed will be announced prior to use for a designated project. Failure to be prepared for class will be graded as an absence. Renderings :

36 IDES 3700 Interior Design Visual Presentations 1 B. Sketch Book 1.All students are required to maintain a sketchbook that will be a record of all class notes, in - class drawings and assigned sketching exercises. 2.This sketchbook should be considered a portfolio of graphic composition development and technique. Emphasis should be placed on the content as well as the presentation of the content. 3.All entries are to be done in pencil (HB or B) or black felt tip pin. All entries must be sequential and dated. Pages should not be removed or added to the sketchbook. 4.The sketchbook is for the benefit of the student to maintain a record and a visual process of growth and development. The sketchbook will not be graded but sketches and the development of concepts will be reviewed. (NOTE: Please, refer to visuals indicated during lecture as an example of how to visually compose information for the sketchbook.) Renderings :

37 IDES 3700 Interior Design Visual Presentations 1 C. Exercises/Experiences Exercises are defined as short studio modules complimenting and/or supplementing studio projects. Exercises and graded class experiences must be completed as assigned and prepared to present at the beginning of designated class period. If not complete, present what is finished for partial credit or a grade of zero will be recorded. To maintain organization and a professional standard, late and early exercises will not be accepted. However, please note, the professor maintains the right to make individual exceptions based on extreme circumstances or “Acts of God.” Renderings :

38 IDES 3700 Interior Design Visual Presentations 1 C. Exercises/Experiences Exercises will be graded based on a key. Additional grade sheets will not be provided since points will be marked directly on each exercise. Each exercise provides a location for total points possible and points earned within the exercise header. KEY:+Excellent! Nice job, but don’t stop improving. -“OK”, you did it, but where is that quality that makes it special? You fell in a big hole. Keep practicing! Where is it? Renderings :

39 IDES 3700 Interior Design Visual Presentations 1 D. Assignments Assignments are verbal and may consist of reading chapters, gathering information, gathering products, and drawing or sketching. Assignments are for the benefit of the student and must be completed to understand the exercises and projects. No grade will be assigned. Renderings :

40 IDES 3700 Interior Design Visual Presentations 1 E. Projects Projects are defined as major studio accomplishments that develop and enhance course objectives. Projects must be completed as assigned and prepared to present at the beginning of designated class period for open review sessions. Depending on the nature of the project, it will be graded in class with student participation and discussion or taken up for grading and returned to the student. Grade sheets must be included with all projects for the student to receive a grade. Renderings :

41 IDES 3700 Interior Design Visual Presentations 1 E. Projects Projects will be graded on an achievement rating per each descriptive category found on the grade sheet. Achievement : Renderings : (P) poor (BA) below average (A) average (AA) above average (E) excellent

42 IDES 3700 Interior Design Visual Presentations 1 E. Projects Individual characteristics of each category of the project will be graded based on a key. KEY:+Excellent! Nice job, but don’t stop improving. -“OK”, you did it, but where is that quality that makes it special? You fell in a big hole. Keep practicing! Where is it? Renderings :

43 IDES 3700 Interior Design Visual Presentations 1 Grading: Department of Human Sciences Grading Policy –91-100%= A –81-90%= B –71-80%= C –61-70%= D –60-below%= F All exercises and projects are to be completed on time and presented at the previously announced time and place. Early exercises and projects will not be accepted. Late exercises and projects will not be accepted. If not complete, turn in what is finished for partial credit or a grade of zero will be recorded. Studio experiences cannot be made up or replaced in any manner. Projects: 3 at 200 points each Exercises:5 at 20 points each Renderings :

44 IDES 3700 Interior Design Visual Presentations 1 Supplies: hard bound sketch book (8 1/2"x 11")assorted markers black felt tip penscolored pencils assorted color felt tip penspencil sharpener pastelserasers: kneaded and pink pearl sanding block11" x 17" spiral sketch book roll of tracing paper45 degree triangles lead holder30/60 degree triangles 4H, 2H, H, HB, 2B, 4B leadsadjustable triangle triangular architects scaledrafting tapes or dots 4H, 2H, H, HB, 2B, 4B wood pencilsdrafting brush set of technical penslettering guide eraser shieldskum bag T-square18" cork back steel rule 18" x 24" vellumcolor wheel Renderings :

45 IDES 3700 Interior Design Visual Presentations 1 Suggested Supplies for Future Use: digital camera 25' steel measuring tape electric or battery operated eraser Additional supplies will be necessary for specific projects and are subject to the student's interpretation of that particular project. Renderings :

46 IDES 3700 Interior Design Visual Presentations 1 Required Text: Mitton, Maureen, Interior Design Visual Presentation: A Guide to Graphics, Models & Presentation Techniques, 2nd edition, Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Selected References: Ching, Francis D.K., Architectural Graphics, 4th ed., New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold, Ching, Francis D.K., Interior Design Illustrated, New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold, Cooper, Douglas, Drawing and Perceiving, 2nd ed., New York:Van Nostrand Reinhold, Edwards, B., Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain, Los Angeles: J. P. Tarcher, Inc., Montague, John, Basic Perspective Drawing: A Visual Approach, 2nd ed., New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold, Woods, M. Perspective in Art, Cincinnati: Ohio: North Light Books, Renderings :

47 IDES 3700 Interior Design Visual Presentations 1 NOTICE TO LOTTERY SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS: Students receiving a lottery scholarship must earn a 2.75 GPA after attempting 24 credit hours and a 3.0 GPA after attempting 48 or more. Students who drop below full-time status (12 hours) during the first 14 days of the semester will have their awards adjusted and will owe money to the University. Students who drop after the 14th day of class will have their future lottery scholarships suspended unless the drop was approved in advance by the Financial Aid Office.Financial Aid Office Students may appeal the suspension if the drop is due to documented personal illness, illness or death of immediate family members, extreme financial hardship, military service or other extraordinary circumstances beyond the student's control. A PDF version of the lottery appeal form may be obtained on-line.lottery appeal form Renderings :

48 IDES 3700 Interior Design Visual Presentations 1 NOTICE TO HOPE SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS (Lottery) Continued: Please note, the minimum GPA requirement cannot be appealed. You also need to be aware that if you repeat a course, both are counted towards your lottery scholarship GPA. Suppose, for example, you receive an "F" in a course but then repeat the course and receive an "A" grade. Your MTSU GPA is now 4.0. But your lottery scholarship GPA is only 2.0, not high enough to keep the scholarship. Finally, please be aware that these rules and procedures have been established by the Tennessee Legislature, not by the Board of Regents, MTSU, your college or department. For more information see these web sites: Tennessee Scholar Dollars and the Tennessee Student Assistance Corporation.Tennessee Scholar DollarsTennessee Student Assistance Corporation Renderings :

49 IDES 3700 Interior Design Visual Presentations 1 FAMILY EDUCATIONAL RIGHTS AND PRIVACY ACT (FERPA): In general, under FERPA I am not permitted to disclose your academic progress to anyone not allowed to receive such information.FERPA Thus I cannot discuss your academic progress, grades, etc., over the phone or via . All such discussions must be in person. At the end of the semester I cannot disclose your final grade over the phone or via . Nor can I "post" your grades on my door. You will receive your final grades via PIPELINEMT or WEBMT. Additionally, I cannot access your grades if you have a "hold" on your records. Renderings :

50 IDES 3700 Interior Design Visual Presentations 1 ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT: Plagiarism, cheating and other forms of academic dishonesty are prohibited. Students guilty of academic misconduct, either directly or indirectly through participation or assistance, are immediately responsible to the instructor of the class. In addition to other possible disciplinary sanctions which may be imposed through the regular institutional procedures as a result of academic misconduct, the instructor has the authority to assign an F or a zero for the exercise or examination; or to assign an F in the course. If the student believes he or she has been erroneously accused of academic misconduct, and if his or her final grade has been lowered as a result, the student may appeal the case through the appropriate institutional procedures. Renderings :

51 IDES 3700 Interior Design Visual Presentations 1 REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: If you have a disability that may require assistance or accommodation, or if you have a question related to any accommodations for testing, note takers, readers, etc., please speak with me as soon as possible. Students may also contact the Office of Disabled Student Services ( ) with questions about such services.Office of Disabled Student Services ( ) Renderings :

52 IDES 3700 Interior Design Visual Presentations 1 Course Syllabus Statement (Disclaimer): The course syllabus and outline is a guide for the semester and is subject to change. Any additions or modifications to the syllabus or course outline/schedule/calendar will be announced in class. It is the student’s responsibility to take note of such changes. Renderings :

53 Course Outline

54 IDES 3700 Fall 2007 Course Outline: 8/27Greetings and Introductions Introduction to Course Course Syllabus and Outline Review: drafting techniques, line weight, line quality, floor plans, symbols, color schemes, elements and principles Reading Assignment: Chapter 1-Orthographic Drawings 8/29Interactive Activity: Chapter 1 Studio: Assignment 1: selection of materials, finishes, fabrics, furniture, lighting and accessories for provided floor plan 9/5Studio: Assignment 1: selection of materials, finishes, fabrics, furniture, lighting and accessories for provided floor plan 9/6MTSU Student Chapter ASID/IIDA Membership Meeting 6:00

55 Course Outline

56 Online Resources hingMaterials.html evCom/guidebk/teachtip/writesyl.htm er/publications/syllabus.html s/index.html

57 Questions

58 Thanks!!! Deborah Belcher, Allied member ASID, IDEC Registered Interior Designer State of Tennessee # 156 Middle Tennessee State University Human Sciences Department Interior Design Program POB 86 Murfreesboro, TN FAX


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