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U.S. enters WWII Chapter 24, section 4. FDR’s support of England FDR announces American neutrality after GB/France’s declaration of war on Germany Despite.

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Presentation on theme: "U.S. enters WWII Chapter 24, section 4. FDR’s support of England FDR announces American neutrality after GB/France’s declaration of war on Germany Despite."— Presentation transcript:

1 U.S. enters WWII Chapter 24, section 4

2 FDR’s support of England FDR announces American neutrality after GB/France’s declaration of war on Germany Despite neutrality, FDR worked around laws to support GB

3 FDR’s support of England Neutrality Act of warring nations could buy weapons from the U.S. if they paid cash and carried arms on their own ships

4 FDR’s support of England FDR also worked around laws to send 50 old destroyers to GB for the right to build bases in Newfoundland, Bermuda, and islands in the Caribbean

5 The Election of 1940 FDR decided to run for a 3 rd term in 1940 Many Americans did not want to change leaders during this time Republican opponent—Wendell Willkie FDR wins by a large margin

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7 FDR’s support of England After election, FDR expanded nation’s role in the war FDR passes the Lend-Lease Act--- gave FDR power to assist any country considered “vital to the defense of the U.S.” $40 billion in weapons sent to GB

8 FDR claimed the USA would become the “Arsenal of Democracy”

9 DEFENSE SPENDING INCREASES AS THE U.S. REALIZES IT MUST PREPARE FOR EVENTUAL WAR AGAINST THE AGGRESSORS

10 FDR’s support of England 1941, FDR and Churchill have secret meeting on the coast of Newfoundland Developed the Atlantic Charter--- 1.Established postwar goals 2. Basis of the creation of the United Nations

11 home home | search the site | sitemap search the site sitemap Text of the Atlantic Charter The President of the United States of America and the Prime Minister, Mr. Churchill, representing His Majesty's Government in the United Kingdom, being met together, deem it right to make known certain common principles in the national policies of their respective countries on which they base their hopes for a better future for the world. First, their countries seek no aggrandizement, territorial or other; Second, they desire to see no territorial changes that do not accord with the freely expressed wishes of the peoples concerned; Third, they respect the right of all peoples to choose the form of government under which they will live; and they wish to see sovereign rights and self government restored to those who have been forcibly deprived of them; Fourth, they will endeavor, with due respect for their existing obligations, to further the enjoyment by all States, great or small, victor or vanquished, of access, on equal terms, to the trade and to the raw materials of the world which are needed for their economic prosperity; Fifth, they desire to bring about the fullest collaboration between all nations in the economic field with the object of securing, for all, improved labor standards, economic advancement and social security; Sixth, after the final destruction of the Nazi tyranny, they hope to see established a peace which will afford to all nations the means of dwelling in safety within their own boundaries, and which will afford assurance that all the men in all lands may live out their lives in freedom from fear and want; Seventh, such a peace should enable all men to traverse the high seas and oceans without hindrance; Eighth, they believe that all of the nations of the world, for realistic as well as spiritual reasons must come to the abandonment of the use of force. Since no future peace can be maintained if land, sea or air armaments continue to be employed by nations which threaten, or may threaten, aggression outside of their frontiers, they believe, pending the establishment of a wider and permanent system of general security, that the disarmament of such nations is essential. They will likewise aid and encourage all other practicable measure which will lighten for peace-loving peoples the crushing burden of armaments. Franklin D. Roosevelt Winston S. Churchill This is Churchill's edited copy of the final draft of the Atlantic Charter. This is Churchill's edited copy of the final draft of the Atlantic Charter. home home | search the site | sitemap search the site sitemap Text of the Atlantic Charter The President of the United States of America and the Prime Minister, Mr. Churchill, representing His Majesty's Government in the United Kingdom, being met together, deem it right to make known certain common principles in the national policies of their respective countries on which they base their hopes for a better future for the world. First, their countries seek no aggrandizement, territorial or other; Second, they desire to see no territorial changes that do not accord with the freely expressed wishes of the peoples concerned; Third, they respect the right of all peoples to choose the form of government under which they will live; and they wish to see sovereign rights and self government restored to those who have been forcibly deprived of them; Fourth, they will endeavor, with due respect for their existing obligations, to further the enjoyment by all States, great or small, victor or vanquished, of access, on equal terms, to the trade and to the raw materials of the world which are needed for their economic prosperity; Fifth, they desire to bring about the fullest collaboration between all nations in the economic field with the object of securing, for all, improved labor standards, economic advancement and social security; Sixth, after the final destruction of the Nazi tyranny, they hope to see established a peace which will afford to all nations the means of dwelling in safety within their own boundaries, and which will afford assurance that all the men in all lands may live out their lives in freedom from fear and want; Seventh, such a peace should enable all men to traverse the high seas and oceans without hindrance; Eighth, they believe that all of the nations of the world, for realistic as well as spiritual reasons must come to the abandonment of the use of force. Since no future peace can be maintained if land, sea or air armaments continue to be employed by nations which threaten, or may threaten, aggression outside of their frontiers, they believe, pending the establishment of a wider and permanent system of general security, that the disarmament of such nations is essential. They will likewise aid and encourage all other practicable measure which will lighten for peace-loving peoples the crushing burden of armaments. Franklin D. Roosevelt Winston S. Churchill This is Churchill's edited copy of the final draft of the Atlantic Charter. This is Churchill's edited copy of the final draft of the Atlantic Charter. The President of the United States of America and the Prime Minister, Mr. Churchill, representing His Majesty's Government in the United Kingdom, being met together, deem it right to make known certain common principles in the national policies of their respective countries on which they base their hopes for a better future for the world. First, their countries seek no aggrandizement, territorial or other; Second, they desire to see no territorial changes that do not accord with the freely expressed wishes of the peoples concerned; Third, they respect the right of all peoples to choose the form of government under which they will live; and they wish to see sovereign rights and self government restored to those who have been forcibly deprived of them; Fourth, they will endeavor, with due respect for their existing obligations, to further the enjoyment by all States, great or small, victor or vanquished, of access, on equal terms, to the trade and to the raw materials of the world which are needed for their economic prosperity; Fifth, they desire to bring about the fullest collaboration between all nations in the economic field with the object of securing, for all, improved labor standards, economic advancement and social security; Sixth, after the final destruction of the Nazi tyranny, they hope to see established a peace which will afford to all nations the means of dwelling in safety within their own boundaries, and which will afford assurance that all the men in all lands may live out their lives in freedom from fear and want; Seventh, such a peace should enable all men to traverse the high seas and oceans without hindrance; Eighth, they believe that all of the nations of the world, for realistic as well as spiritual reasons must come to the abandonment of the use of force. Since no future peace can be maintained if land, sea or air armaments continue to be employed by nations which threaten, or may threaten, aggression outside of their frontiers, they believe, pending the establishment of a wider and permanent system of general security, that the disarmament of such nations is essential. They will likewise aid and encourage all other practicable measure which will lighten for peace-loving peoples the crushing burden of armaments. Franklin D. Roosevelt Winston S. Churchill ATLANTIC CHARTER

12 Bombing of Pearl Harbor Created the Co-Prosperity Sphere in Asia Goal: was to help Asian nations escape European imperialism They wanted an Asia controlled by Asians By 1939, Japan began to grab European possessions in SE Asia

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14 Bombing of Pearl Harbor To stop aggression, USA banned sale of war materials to Japan(oil, iron, steel) Angered Japan, 80% of oil came from U.S.

15 Bombing of Pearl Harbor The USA was interfering with Japanese plans in Asia USA condemned Japanese actions in Asia

16 Bombing of Pearl Harbor December 7, 1941 Japanese bomb American Naval Base in Hawaii

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18 Bombing of Pearl Harbor Total disaster for U.S. 19 warships destroyed 300 planes destroyed 2,400 men killed 1,200 men wounded Japan lost 29 planes

19 Bombing of Pearl Harbor FDR ask Congress for Dec. of War Referred to the bombing as “A date which will live in infamy”

20 Bombing of Pearl Harbor Following FDR’s speech, everyone in Congress voted yes…except one Jeanette Rankin, was lone Congressman that voted against it


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