Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Developing a Quality Curriculum NUT National Education Conference Dave Peck The Curriculum Foundation.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Developing a Quality Curriculum NUT National Education Conference Dave Peck The Curriculum Foundation."— Presentation transcript:

1 Developing a Quality Curriculum NUT National Education Conference Dave Peck The Curriculum Foundation

2 Content 1.The context of the new National Curriculum 2.What do we mean by a quality curriculum? 3.How do we develop one?

3 The Context of the New National Curriculum September 2014!!! It’s a joke The global 21 st century curriculum race Shift away from threshold measures to progress measures Abolition of NC levels If we don’t thoroughly overhaul the curriculum now…… September 2014!!! It’s a joke The global 21 st century curriculum race Shift away from threshold measures to progress measures Abolition of NC levels If we don’t thoroughly overhaul the curriculum now……

4 Also available: Top Quality Snake Oil Also available: Top Quality Snake Oil

5 MathsEnglishScienceGeography History REPE Music Languages Art & Design Design Technology Computing

6 Where do the boundaries lie? Curriculum ParadigmCharacteristics Subject knowledge The curriculum is all the documented subject learning schools (are required to) teach Subjects Plus In addition to this subject teaching there are wider elements of the curriculum addressed in other ways e.g. through tutor time, visits, assemblies, performances, extra-curricular(!) activities All Planned (Learning ?) Experiences Everything planned is part of the curriculum i.e. all of the above learning opportunities plus sports events, parents’ evenings, visitors to the school, volunteering opportunities, duties, peer support, etc. All-inclusive Everything that happens in school reflects the school ethos and culture and hence everything that happens in school (including unstructured time such as breaks) or through school is part of the curriculum 6

7 The Context of the New National Curriculum The review has been driven by the ‘small government’ doctrine …. teachers are the experts It is an ‘essential knowledge’ curriculum - some sections are detailed & others are very sparse It’s not national, nor new, nor a curriculum Major focus on literacy & numeracy: fluency Prescription is in inverse proportion to age The review has been driven by the ‘small government’ doctrine …. teachers are the experts It is an ‘essential knowledge’ curriculum - some sections are detailed & others are very sparse It’s not national, nor new, nor a curriculum Major focus on literacy & numeracy: fluency Prescription is in inverse proportion to age

8 How much curriculum freedom?

9 The State We’re In Few senior leaders / teachers have had any professional development in curriculum development / design Few teachers have curriculum development / design experience Many teachers see themselves as curriculum delivery technicians Many teachers believe the curriculum is something handed down to them by higher authority that they have to do to pupils Many do not feel confident about implementing the new NC But there is some good news: YoC Few senior leaders / teachers have had any professional development in curriculum development / design Few teachers have curriculum development / design experience Many teachers see themselves as curriculum delivery technicians Many teachers believe the curriculum is something handed down to them by higher authority that they have to do to pupils Many do not feel confident about implementing the new NC But there is some good news: YoC

10 What is all the ‘stuff’ we have to teach? How much of it is in our existing curriculum? How can we ‘slot in’ what’s missing? Job done? What is all the ‘stuff’ we have to teach? How much of it is in our existing curriculum? How can we ‘slot in’ what’s missing? Job done? How effective is learning now? How much does it need to change to make learning (in the context of the new curriculum) really effective? How effective is learning now? How much does it need to change to make learning (in the context of the new curriculum) really effective? Asking the right questions about the new curriculum Which approach feels most comfortable? Why?

11 What do we mean by effective learning? Your own experience of learning? Unengaging; teacher-led; monotonous; unquestioned facts; task-oriented; unmemorable; summative assessment; alien / unconnected Inspiring; teacher / group / paired / student-led; varied; debatable interpretations; learning-oriented; very memorable; formative assessment; relevant / personalised Ineffective Highly effective What part does an outstanding curriculum play?

12 If we agree it’s about deep learning… How effective is learning now? How do you know? How much does it need to change? Do you have an agreed statement / description of quality learning? If so, how was it derived? Who was consulted? Is it part of the school’s DNA? Where does the National Curriculum sit? How effective is learning now? How do you know? How much does it need to change? Do you have an agreed statement / description of quality learning? If so, how was it derived? Who was consulted? Is it part of the school’s DNA? Where does the National Curriculum sit?

13 Often negative feelings stem from criticism suffered long ago. It’s as if we had been hypnotised to accept our non-existent limitations. Peter Kline The Everyday Genius

14 Foothills…. Create Evaluate Apply Understand Remember or peak?

15

16 Content Cohort Student learning and outcomes Teaching & Assessment Perceptions Monitoring Progress - Different Lenses on the School Different Lenses on the Curriculum

17 Features of schools making change Black Country Challenge Mick Waters 2012

18 What do we mean by ‘the curriculum’? UNESCO’s International Bureau of Education considers three interrelated dimensions of the curriculum: the intended or official curriculum as defined in guidelines, frameworks and guides that specify what students are expected to learn and should be able to do; the implemented curriculum that is actually taught in the classroom, including how it is delivered and who teaches it; and the attained curriculum that represents what students have actually learned. They go on to point out that the challenge is ensuring coherence and congruence between curriculum policy documents, the actual pedagogical process and learning outcomes. UNESCO’s International Bureau of Education considers three interrelated dimensions of the curriculum: the intended or official curriculum as defined in guidelines, frameworks and guides that specify what students are expected to learn and should be able to do; the implemented curriculum that is actually taught in the classroom, including how it is delivered and who teaches it; and the attained curriculum that represents what students have actually learned. They go on to point out that the challenge is ensuring coherence and congruence between curriculum policy documents, the actual pedagogical process and learning outcomes. 18

19 What do young people need to succeed in the 21 st century? How would you describe a young person who is equipped for life? Take 10 minutes to complete your description Your list will probably include skills, attitudes, qualities, values and dispositions 19

20 creative makes connections questioning communicates well confident takes risks thirst for knowledge curious generates ideas flexible compassionate persevering listens and reflects critical self-editing skilled shaper literate willing to have a go thinks for themselves shows initiative gets on well with others makes a difference acts with integrity self-esteem respectful ‘can do’ attitude learns from mistakes independent healthy There is no right answer but your description undoubtedly includes some of the following: loves learning 20

21

22

23 A lot of information.... How can we use it? Which qualities relate to the heart? What do we want young people to be able to do? What do we want young people to know? What does it tell us about: Aims? Values? Competencies? The school curriculum? Who should be engaged in the process? The more stakeholders / groups the better? It always leads to some valuable discussions

24

25 Somewhere Primary School Strengths of our pupils They are... Thoughtful Articulate Literate Numerate Creative Happy Confident Caring and empathetic Friendly Good social skills Areas for Development We aim to encourage our pupils to be more... Independent and self motivated Resourceful Resilient Responsible Creative Have greater respect for property Have a bigger picture of the world

26 Theory into practice If we want learners to be more…. Independent and self motivated Resourceful Resilient Responsible Creative The curriculum must…. ???

27 MathsEnglishScienceGeography History REPE Music Languages Art & Design Design Technology Computing

28 Maths EnglishScience Geography PEHistoryRE Music LanguagesArt & Design Design Technology Computing

29 Planning the school curriculum Lessons Themes Field study Pupil responsibility: routines Subject-focused lessons Working with artistResidential Visit Local studySchool garden Newspaper Coaching Expertise of staff After school activities Community projects Museum Visits Assemblies

30 Planning the school curriculum Lessons Themes Field study Pupil responsibility: routines Subject- focused lessons Working with artistResidential Visit Local studySchool garden Newspaper Coaching Expertise of staff After school activities Community projects Museum Visits Assemblies Subject areas Key skills Personal development Competencies

31 A joined-up curriculum Lessons Themes Field study Pupil responsibility: routines Subject-focused lessons Working with artistResidential Visit Local studySchool garden Newspaper Coaching Expertise of staff After school activities Community projects Museum Visits Assemblies

32 Standardised units (60 min sessions) Metronomic Classroom Serial experiences Narrow range T/L Learner as receiver Teacher The class Content and coverage Towards the test Flexible: Time matched to learning need Regular/often – deep/immersive Range of locations – flexible spaces - permeable school – cyber- space Connected and interdisciplinary Wider range of approaches – project-based, enquiry-based, co-constructed, student initiated School as broker – employer, artist, poet, community, peers - other goupings Outcomes and impact Towards lifelong learning Organising learning in a curriculum for the future When? Where? How? Who? What? C20 th C21 th

33 Performance MeasuresLearners’ best interests Chasing cuspsAll treated equally Little / no focus on skills and competenciesComprehensive focus on skills and competencies Course selection in best interests of school outcomes Course selection in best interests of learners Focus on key examination years and intervention Focus on continuous progress Focus on tried and tested teaching and learning Focus on innovation and memorable experiences A choice or a compromise?

34 The Year of the Curriculum A curriculum design programme produced by the Curriculum Foundation in partnership with the NUT What are we trying to achieve? How shall we organise learning? How shall we evaluate success? How do we make it happen? The programme consists of four modules, each with two units:

35 The school curriculum and the National Curriculum School Curriculum National Curriculum Maintained schools since 1988 National Curriculum

36 School Curriculum National Curriculum Getting the balance right National Curriculum How much ‘school curriculum’ can be created and how will it be used for the benefit of learners? National Curriculum Whose is the school curriculum? Who will design it? Who will be consulted? Whose is the school curriculum? Who will design it? Who will be consulted?

37 Is it a topic, a lesson, a homework, an assembly? School Curriculum National Curriculum The body? Mary Seacole and the Crimean War? Abuse of alcohol and other drugs? Know where food comes from? …great artists, architects and designers in History? The body? Mary Seacole and the Crimean War? Abuse of alcohol and other drugs? Know where food comes from? …great artists, architects and designers in History? ….or a bin job?

38 What should we do with the school curriculum? School Curriculum National Curriculum Excite imagination World history Skills and competences for learning and life Sense of agency Hopefulness Big ideas Learners interests and talents Environment and sustainability Creativity Local curriculum Personalisation Relevance Drama PSHE / Citizenship Aims Trips / visits Outdoor learning / play Latin

39 Magnetism

40 Magnetism

41 Explaining Your Curriculum: The Tree Model

42 42 Quality of leadership in, and management of, the school 1 Outstanding2 Good Curricular impact …does your curriculum do this? The school’s curriculum promotes and sustains a thirst for knowledge and a love of learning. It covers a wide range of subjects and provides opportunities for academic, technical and sporting excellence. It has a very positive impact on all pupils’ behaviour and safety, and contributes very well to pupils’ academic achievement, their physical wellbeing, and their spiritual, moral, social and cultural development. The school’s curriculum encourages a thirst for knowledge and a love of learning. It covers a range of subjects and provides opportunities for academic, technical and sporting excellence and contributes well to pupils’ academic achievement, their physical wellbeing, and their spiritual, moral, social and cultural development. It promotes positive behaviour and a good understanding of safety matters. Pupil Premium The school’s actions have secured improvement in achievement for those supported by the pupil premium, which is rising rapidly, including in English and mathematics. The school’s actions have secured improvement in achievement for those supported by the pupil premium, which is rising, including in English and mathematics. Impact of policies There are excellent policies underpinning practice which ensure that pupils have high levels of literacy, or pupils are making excellent progress in literacy. The well thought out policies ensure that pupils make at least good progress in literacy. Parents/carers The school has highly successful strategies for engaging with parents to the benefit of pupils, including those who find working with the school difficult. The school works well with parents, including those who might find working with the school difficult, to achieve positive benefits for pupils. Safeguarding The school’s arrangements for safeguarding pupils meet statutory requirements.

43 43 The behaviour and safety of pupils at the school 1 Outstanding2 Good Attitudes Pupils’ consistently display a thirst for knowledge and a love of learning, including in independent, group and whole class work, which have a very strong impact on their progress in lessons. Pupils’ attitudes to learning are of an equally high standard across subjects, years, classes and with different staff. Pupils’ attitudes to all aspects of learning, including in independent, group and whole class work, are consistently positive, and have a good impact on the progress they make Pupils respond very quickly to staff’s instructions and requests allowing lessons to flow smoothly and without interruption. Low-level disruption in lessons is uncommon. Pupils’ attitudes to learning are positive across subjects, years, classes and with different staff. Pupils understand the importance of good attitudes and behaviour in school life, adult life and work. Views Parents, staff and pupils are unreservedly positive about both behaviour and safety.There are few well founded concerns expressed by parents, staff and pupils about behaviour and safety. Ethos Pupils’ behaviour outside lessons is almost always impeccable. Pupils’ pride in the school is shown by their excellent conduct, manners and punctuality. Pupils are keenly aware how good attitudes and behaviour contribute to school life, adult life and work. There is a positive ethos in, and around, the school. Pupils conduct themselves well at all different times of day, including at lunch time, attend regularly, have good attitudes and are punctual to lessons. Behaviour Management Skilled and highly consistent behaviour management by all staff makes a strong contribution to an exceptionally positive climate for learning. There are excellent improvements in behaviour over time for individuals or groups with particular behaviour needs. Behaviour is managed consistently well. There are marked improvements in behaviour over time for individuals or groups with particular behavioural needs. Bullying Pupils are fully aware of different forms of bullying, including cyber- bullying and prejudice-based bullying, and actively try to prevent it from occurring. Bullying and derogatory or aggressive language in all their forms are rare and dealt with highly effectively. Pupils have a good awareness of different forms of bullying. There are few instances of bullying and these are dealt with effectively by the school. Safety All groups of pupils are safe and feel safe at school and at alternative provision placements at all times. They understand very clearly what constitutes unsafe situations and are highly aware of how to keep themselves and others safe, including in relation to e- safety. Pupils are safe and feel safe at school and at alternative provision placements and understand how to keep themselves safe in different situations.

44 44 The quality of teaching in the school 1 Outstanding2 Good Overall impact Much of the teaching in all key stages and most subjects is outstanding and never less than consistently good. As a result, almost all pupils currently on roll in the school, including disabled pupils, those who have special educational needs, those for whom the pupil premium provides support and the most able, are making rapid and sustained progress. Teaching in most subjects, including English and mathematics, is usually good, with examples of some outstanding teaching. As a result, most pupils and groups of pupils on roll in the school, including disabled pupils, those who have special educational needs, those for whom the pupil premium provides support and the most able, make good progress and achieve well over time. Expectations All teachers have consistently high expectations of all pupils. Teachers have high expectations. Expertise They plan and teach lessons that enable pupils to learn exceptionally well across the curriculum. They plan and teach lessons that deepen pupils’ knowledge and understanding and enable them to develop a range of skills across the curriculum. Strategies Teachers use well-judged and often imaginative teaching strategies, including setting appropriate homework that, together with clearly directed and timely support and intervention, match individual needs accurately. Consequently, pupils learn exceptionally well across the curriculum. Effective teaching strategies, including setting appropriate homework, and appropriately targeted support and intervention are matched well to most pupils’ individual needs, including those most and least able, so that pupils learn well in lessons. Basic skills The teaching of reading, writing, communication and mathematics is highly effective and cohesively planned and implemented across the curriculum. Reading, writing, communication and mathematics are taught effectively. Motivate & enthuse Teachers and other adults authoritatively impart knowledge to ensure students are engaged in learning, and generate high levels of commitment to learning across the school. Teachers and other adults create a positive climate for learning in their lessons and pupils are interested and engaged. Feedback and Questioning Teachers systematically and effectively check pupils’ understanding throughout lessons, anticipating where they may need to intervene and doing so with notable impact on the quality of learning. Teachers listen to, carefully observe and skilfully question pupils during lessons in order to reshape tasks and explanations to improve learning. Assessment Consistently high quality marking and constructive feedback from teachers ensure that pupils make rapid gains. Teachers assess pupils’ learning and progress regularly and accurately at all key stages, including in the Early Years Foundation Stage. They ensure that pupils know how well they have done and what they need to do to improve.

45 Designing your curriculum How do we design a curriculum -which promotes and sustains a thirst for knowledge and a love of learning? -with attitudes to learning of an equally high standard across subjects, years, classes and with different staff? -in which the teaching of reading, writing, communication and mathematics is highly effective and cohesively planned and implemented across the curriculum? -in which teachers and other adults authoritatively impart knowledge to ensure students are engaged in learning? To what extent must curriculum policy and practice be established at school level? Is there a tension between doing the right thing and league table outcomes? If so how is it addressed?

46 Question for teachers: Do you see yourself as ….. ….. a curriculum delivery technician… or….. a professional designer of learning?

47 What are we going to do now? Design and implement a complete world class curriculum for our learners in our schools Build in all the learning experiences needed for: knowledge and understanding; skills and competencies; attitudes and values National Curriculum in perspective Use ‘Year of the Curriculum’ programme Be an evangelist for a 21 st century curriculum for England Design and implement a complete world class curriculum for our learners in our schools Build in all the learning experiences needed for: knowledge and understanding; skills and competencies; attitudes and values National Curriculum in perspective Use ‘Year of the Curriculum’ programme Be an evangelist for a 21 st century curriculum for England

48 "Education is not filling a bucket, but lighting a fire." W. B. Yeats

49


Download ppt "Developing a Quality Curriculum NUT National Education Conference Dave Peck The Curriculum Foundation."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google