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2014 Jr. FLL Season Overview. Introductions Casey O’Connell Administration Representative Jarod Struck Teacher Mentor Katra Knoernschild Team Coordinator.

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Presentation on theme: "2014 Jr. FLL Season Overview. Introductions Casey O’Connell Administration Representative Jarod Struck Teacher Mentor Katra Knoernschild Team Coordinator."— Presentation transcript:

1 2014 Jr. FLL Season Overview

2 Introductions Casey O’Connell Administration Representative Jarod Struck Teacher Mentor Katra Knoernschild Team Coordinator Karl Knoernschild Technical Lead

3 Jr.FLL Coaches Secretariat’s Surprise Lori Davis Barry Mei Churchill Champions (2 nd Grade) Ann Hart Mighty Mustangs (2 nd Grade) Karl Knoernschild Paul Peake Third Grade Team JoDale Lee Student mentor Michael Tierney

4 FIRST Youth Protection Program FIRST will strive to create an environment in which team members can grow, learn, and have fun with minimal risk of injury. FIRST will strive to inform everyone involved in its programs of its Youth Protection Program (FIRST YPP), and related resources, and provide assistance in meeting its standards. FIRST will maintain a Youth Protection Department (FIRST YPD) at its Manchester, New Hampshire headquarters for the purpose of fulfilling its commitment to protecting youth. Coaches are required to complete a confidential background check via Verified Volunteers

5 FIRST Youth Protection Program Two Lead Coaches/Mentors trained in safety measures, who know the provisions of the FIRST YPP oversee a team’s activities. Everyone on a team, or working with a team, is able to talk about, and listen to, discussions of the Code of Conduct in age-appropriate terms, and is committed to complying with it. Everyone working with a team understands acceptable boundaries and behaviors, as well as the actions necessary if these are not honored. Parents and guardians are aware of, and to the extent possible, involved in their child’s team’s activities. Working in combination, the following elements greatly increase the likelihood of team members having a safe and rewarding experience: Adhering to the FIRST YPP will significantly reduce safety risks of program participants

6 Code of Conduct (“the Code”) Environments where team members can learn, have fun, and feel safe. Age-appropriate oversight by caring adults modeling integrity and respect. Knowledge, experience, and skills with a positive and flexible approach. Encouragement to learn by doing, fostering cooperative learning. Environments where team members can develop supportive relationships, while observing appropriate boundaries. Diligent efforts to protect team members from harm. Adults working in FIRST programs are expected to set an example of Gracious Professionalism®, and consistently provide:

7 Code Violations Any adult working with a FIRST team who is aware of a violation of this Code, or who is in doubt about whether or not a behavior is appropriate, is required to immediately consult a team Lead Coach/Mentor (if a team Lead Coach/Mentor is not the potential violator), or the hosting school or organization, and if satisfied with the guidance provided, to act in accordance with it. If the individual seeking guidance is not satisfied with the guidance or if a team Lead Coach/Mentor is the potential violator, the individual is required to contact the FIRST Youth Protection Department (FIRST YPD).

8 Code Violations The following behaviors ordinarily constitute violations of this Code. Engaging in any activity that endangers the safety, security, or integrity of a child; deliberately makes a child feel shame or humiliation; or demeans a child, such as making threatening remarks or behaving in a manner that deliberately intimidates or frightens a child. Engaging in personal exchanges such as phone calls, , texting, social networking, etc., with a child outside the context of team activities, educational matters, or career concerns. A copy of written communications with a child should ordinarily be provided to a parent, guardian, or second adult working with the team. Engaging a child in activities that are not related to the FIRST program, educational matters, or career concerns; or spending personal time with a child outside of FIRST program activities (unless the adult is a family member or family friend). Keeping any activities with a child secret; encouraging a child to keep any activities secret; or deliberately concealing activities from parents, guardians, or other adults working with the team. Making sexually explicit remarks; showing or displaying sexually explicit material; inappropriate physical exposure or contact; or using offensive language or gestures. Failure to follow the Communication & Reporting Requirements.

9 Communication & Reporting Requirements Any adult working with a FIRST team who believes that a child may be the victim of, or at risk of, child abuse (emotional, physical, or sexual) from any source is required to immediately report their concerns. The individual reporting the possibility of abuse should not attempt to conduct an investigation or confront the suspected offender, even if he or she knows the person well. The report should be made to the state or local government child protection agency, or to the local police. If the hosting school or organization has established procedures for reporting child abuse, those reporting procedures should be followed. The FIRST YPD should be notified (to the extent the agencies involved and the hosting school or organization permit this).

10 FIRST Youth Protection Program Required reading for all coaches: churchillfirst.org  Links  FIRST Youth Protection Program

11 What is FIRST? Foundation for the Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology Founded by Dean Kamen, inventor of the Segway Started in 1989 to inspire young people’s interest and participation in science and technology

12 FIRST Programs FIRST Robotics Competition 1992 High School yrs FIRST Tech Challenge 2005 Middle and High School yrs FIRST LEGO ® League 1998 Elementary and Middle School yrs FIRST Junior LEGO ® League 2006 Elementary School yrs (K - 2nd grade)

13 Churchill Elementary FIRST LEGO League Programs Basic Machines 1 st grade Motors, pulleys, gears Jr. FLL Program Participant 1-2 teams of up to 7 members LEGO WeDo 2 nd grade Basic robotics and programming Jr. FLL Program Participant 1-2 teams of up to 7 members each Jr. Robotics 3 rd grade EV3 robotics and programming Preparatory course for 4 th grade FLL team 1-2 teams of up to 10 members each Not a Jr. FLL program participant FLL (4 th and 5 th grade)

14 Basic Machines (1 st grade) LEGO WeDo (2 nd grade) Jr. Robotics (3 rd grade) FLL (4 th -5 th grade) Plank FIRST! (FLL) Gear It Forward (FRC, Oswego East) STEM Degree? D308 FIRST Programs

15 Jr. FIRST LEGO League Activities Research challenges facing today’s scientists Apply real-world math and science concepts Design and build challenge solutions using LEGO elements Learn basic computer programming concepts Create a “Show Me” poster Learn team building and presentation skills

16 Jr. FLL Core Values We are a team. We do the work. Our coaches and mentors help us learn, but we find the answers ourselves. We share our experiences and discoveries with others. We are helpful, kind, and show respect when we work, play, and share. We call this Gracious Professionalism. We are all winners. We have fun! The cornerstones of the Jr.FLL program are its Core Values, which emphasize contributions of others, friendly sportsmanship, learning, and community involvement. We ask that everyone affiliated with every team honor these values.

17 Jr.FLL Yearly Challenge A new Challenge every year relating to an important real world issue. Two defined parts The Show Me Poster The Model. Show Me Poster and Model are presented at one or more expositions Jr.FLL teams do not compete like FLL teams do.

18 The Jr. FLL Show Me Poster A flat poster board or tri-fold presentation board. Use words, drawings, photos, and small objects to tell about what they have learned during their Challenge research. Show where they hunted for answers and describe the people they spoke with on their journey. Describe their Model and simple machine. Tell about the team itself.

19 The Model Create a Model made of LEGO parts that fits within a 15” x 15” footprint. Must have at least one motorized moveable piece on the Model. Design a simple machine using LEGO ramps, levers, pulleys, gears, wheels and axles, screws, or wedges and incorporates this into their model. Typically, a team of six will use 400 to 1,000 LEGO parts during the season.

20 2014 Jr.FLL Challenge Choose a place where you could learn something. Choose a specific tool you could use to learn something and find out more about it. Then show what you learned through your LEGO® model and Show Me poster.

21 Jr.FLL First Steps Discuss the Jr. FLL Core Values Introduce the team to the Challenge Brainstorm for topic ideas Demonstrate the LEGO kits Allow the team to experiment with the LEGO kits

22 1 ST Grade Team Supplies Jr.FLL Base Kit (2) LEGO Education 9689 sets (2) sets of instruction booklets for 4 models 15” Square Building Plate LEGO bin Jr.FLL Guide to Building and More Team Binder

23 2 nd Grade Team Supplies Jr.FLL Robotics Kit LEGO Education WeDo (9580) Software CD Instruction booklets for 12 models WeDo Teacher’s Guide (736508) 15” Square Building Plate LEGO bin Laptop computer Jr.FLL Guide to Building and More Team Binder

24 What is Junior Robotics? A program unique to the Churchill FIRST LEGO League (not an official Jr. FLL team) Follows Jr. FLL Core Values EV3 Robotics Training in preparation for joining a FLL team in 4 th grade The LEGO EV3 Space Challenge Set (45570) is used for training The team creates a Show Me poster to present what they have learned

25 Junior Robotics Activities Design and build Space Challenge solutions using the EV3 robot and LEGO elements Create a “Show Me” poster Apply real-world math and science concepts Research challenges facing today’s scientists Learn team building and presentation skills

26 Space Challenge A full curriculum that teaches STEM concepts Seven Challenge Missions, nine Learning Missions one Basics of Gears project Three Research Projects co-developed with actual space engineers

27 The Jr. Robotics Show Me Poster A flat poster board or tri-fold presentation board. Use words, drawings, photos, and small objects to tell about what they have learned during their Challenge research. Show where they hunted for answers and describe the people they spoke with on their journey. Describe their solutions to the Space Challenge missions Tell about the team itself.

28 Junior Robotics First Steps Discuss the Jr. FLL Core Values Introduce the Space Challenge Demonstrate the EV3 LEGO kit Allow the team to experiment with the EV3 LEGO kit

29 Junior Robotics Team Supplies (2) LEGO EV3 Core Sets LEGO EV3 Expansion Set LEGO MINDSTORMS Education EV3 Space Challenge Set 8’ x 4’ Game Table Laptop Computer

30 Season Overview Monday meetings (school days only) 3:45pm – 5:00pm Biweekly status meetings for coaches 5:00pm – 5:15pm First meeting Junior Robotics (3 rd Grade): September 8 Jr. FLL (1 st & 2 nd Grade): September 15 Last meeting December 15 Events (Dates TBD) Churchill Home & School presentation D308 FLL & Jr. FLL Expo at Churchill D308 FIRST Expo at Oswego East Field Trip TBD

31 churchillfirst.org Website A central repository of all information related to the Churchill FIRST LEGO League Club Team Information Sponsors and Fundraisers Event Calendar Team photos and progress updates

32

33 churchillfirst.org Website Instructions at churchillfirst.org/instructions Each team leader (coach, mentor or teacher) has an account. Usernames are Firstname_Lastname Log in at the bottom of any page Coaches may add blog posts including photos, team progress, events, etc. The Wordpress app is available on iPhone and Android Children should be identified by first name or first name and last initial only

34 Coach Advice Don’t build the model or robot, don’t program it, the kids need to do this and they can Don’t finish the challenge for them, but you can build examples, and teach them example programs. If students ask for help, you can guide them and explain how they may get to a solution but they need to find the solution themselves Take advantage of team parents wherever possible. Field trips, specialized knowledge, sponsorship, etc.

35 Coach Resources Coach Resources Page churchillfirst.org/coach Website Editing Instructions churchillfirst.org/instructions (must be logged in) FLL Coaches’ Handbook (1 per team) Also available online – see Coach Resources Page

36 2014 Teams

37 Secretariat’s Surprise First Grade Coaches Lori Davis and Barry Mei Caitlyn Bucher Carter Davis Emili Mei Joey Bocik Matt Danison Supraja Donthi Zoya Siddiqui

38 Churchill Champions Second Grade Coach Ann Hart Aidan Hofmann Andrew (Drew) Stima Christopher Czajkowski Grayson Hart Jackson Falk Josiah Ramos

39 Mighty Mustangs Second Grade Coaches Paul Peake and Karl Knoernschild Ashlyn Cook Ian Knoernschild Jenna Benelkour Nathan Keys Nathan Peake Philip Abromowitz

40 Jr. Robotics Third Grade Coach JoDale Lee Student Mentor Michael Tierney Aiden Degand Eamonn Vedder Ethan Langel Ian Hofmann Josiah Lee Katelyn Jones Kyla Hartigan Noah DeMarco Paul Bramstedt


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