Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Science and Art in Public Health: The Struggle to Turn Sows’ Ears into Silk Purses R. Elliott Churchill, MS, MA Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Science and Art in Public Health: The Struggle to Turn Sows’ Ears into Silk Purses R. Elliott Churchill, MS, MA Centers for Disease Control and Prevention."— Presentation transcript:

1

2 Science and Art in Public Health: The Struggle to Turn Sows’ Ears into Silk Purses R. Elliott Churchill, MS, MA Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Source: Teutsch SM, Churchill RE. Principles and Practice of Public Health Surveillance. New York: Oxford U Press, 1999.

3 Reporting unit of science: the fact Reporting unit of communications: the message Reporting unit of science: the fact Reporting unit of communications: the message

4 Where is the wisdom we have lost in knowledge? Where is the knowledge we have lost in information? T. S. Eliot Where is the information we have lost in data? CDC Editors Where is the wisdom we have lost in knowledge? Where is the knowledge we have lost in information? T. S. Eliot Where is the information we have lost in data? CDC Editors

5 Data:The smallest units of description—may be words, numbers or other symbols Information:Data that have been interpreted to provide meaning and contest Message:Information conveyed in such a way as to instruct the intended audience of its importance or relevance to them

6 DATAINFORMATIONMESSAGE 1,000 cases of measles 1,000 cases of measles (50% more than last year) Have all infants vaccinated for measles before their first birthday

7 DATAINFORMATIONMESSAGE 1,000 cases of measles 1,000 cases of measles (50% more than last year) For every dollar spent on vaccines, $21 are saved in health-care costs

8 Communications is a process— not a product. Communications is a process— not a product.

9 **B acts on the basis of the message received A conveys information to B B receives A's information A and B agree on the message sent and received B conveys to A the meaning and intent of A's information B analyzes A's information __________________________ ** Sometimes included in loop. sender message receiver channel impact evaluation The Communications Loop

10 Communications REACTIVE in a control setting PROACTIVE in a prevention setting REACTIVE in a control setting PROACTIVE in a prevention setting

11 Steps in a Successful Public Health Communications Campaign 1.We must develop rapport with our public.

12 Steps in a Successful Public Health Communications Campaign 1. We must develop rapport with our public. 2.We must be patient and persistent. 1. We must develop rapport with our public. 2.We must be patient and persistent.

13 Steps in a Successful Public Health Communications Campaign 1. We must develop rapport with our public. 2. We must be patient and persistent. 3.We must repeat, modify, and update. 1. We must develop rapport with our public. 2. We must be patient and persistent. 3.We must repeat, modify, and update.

14 Steps in a Successful Public Health Communications Campaign 1. We must develop rapport with our public. 2. We must be patient and persistent. 3. We must repeat, modify, and update. 4. We must use all appropriate avenues. 1. We must develop rapport with our public. 2. We must be patient and persistent. 3. We must repeat, modify, and update. 4. We must use all appropriate avenues.

15 Steps in a Successful Public Health Communications Campaign 1. We must develop rapport with our public. 2. We must be patient and persistent. 3. We must repeat, modify, and update. 4. We must use all appropriate avenues. 5. We must ultimately speak person-to-person. 1. We must develop rapport with our public. 2. We must be patient and persistent. 3. We must repeat, modify, and update. 4. We must use all appropriate avenues. 5. We must ultimately speak person-to-person.

16 Pattern of Use of CDC's HIV/AIDS Telephone Hotline Years Calls to HIV/AIDS Hotline

17 ,000,000 10,000,000 15,000,000 20,000,000 25,000,000 30,000,000 35,000,000 40,000,000 45,000,000 50,000,000 Years Calls to HIV/AIDS Hotline Pattern of Use of CDC's HIV/AIDS Telephone Hotline

18 Communications messages must Reach people Persuade them of the validity of the information Convince them to take appropriate action Reach people Persuade them of the validity of the information Convince them to take appropriate action

19 Public Health News 1.Information describing or confirming a new discovery 2.Information revising (or contradicting) an earlier hypothesis 3.Information connecting, for the first time, two or more already-available pieces of information 4.Any (or all) of #1-#3 above, crafted to provide the information to an audience not previously addressed or one identified as now having been reached in previous efforts 1.Information describing or confirming a new discovery 2.Information revising (or contradicting) an earlier hypothesis 3.Information connecting, for the first time, two or more already-available pieces of information 4.Any (or all) of #1-#3 above, crafted to provide the information to an audience not previously addressed or one identified as now having been reached in previous efforts

20 Planning a Communications Program 1.What do I want to say? (MESSAGE) 2.To whom do I want to say it? (AUDIENCE) 3.Through what means can I convey it most effectively? (CHANNEL) 4.When will it have the most advantageous effect? (TIMING) 5.What do I want to have happen as a result of my message? (IMPACT) 6.How will I assess the effect of my message? (EVALUATION) 7.How will I improve the message for its next presentation? (MODIFICATION) 1.What do I want to say? (MESSAGE) 2.To whom do I want to say it? (AUDIENCE) 3.Through what means can I convey it most effectively? (CHANNEL) 4.When will it have the most advantageous effect? (TIMING) 5.What do I want to have happen as a result of my message? (IMPACT) 6.How will I assess the effect of my message? (EVALUATION) 7.How will I improve the message for its next presentation? (MODIFICATION)

21 Marketing Public Health Information Use graphic displays Focus message into one basic statement Highlight and package the information Release the information in a timely manner Use graphic displays Focus message into one basic statement Highlight and package the information Release the information in a timely manner

22 2, DISEASEDECREASEINCREASE CASES CURRENT 4 WEEKS Hepatitis A Hepatitis B Hepatitis, C/Non-A, Non-B Legionellosis Malaria Measles, Total* Meningococcal Infections Mumps Pertussis Rabies, Animal Rubella Ratio (Log Scale) † Beyond Historical Limits FIGURE I. Notifiable disease report, comparison of 4-week totals ending Novem- ber 4, 1995, with historical data — United States

23 SOCO Single Overriding Communications Objective What is new? What works best? Who is affected? What is new? What works best? Who is affected?

24 In one brief paragraph, please state the key point or objective of your submission for publication or presentation. This statement should resemble what you, the writer (speaker), would like to see as the lead paragraph in a newspaper story or in a broadcast news report about your submission. What are the three facts or statistics you would like the public to remember as a result of reading or hearing about your report? What audience or population segment would you like this report to reach? PrimarySecondary What is the one message the audience needs to receive from this report? Who in your office will be available to answer questions posed by media representatives or by members of the reading/listening audience? Name _______________________ Telephone number _____________ Date and times available __________________________ Checklist for Authors of Publications and Presentations, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

25 Channels of Communications for Large Audiences Publications Electronic Applications Broadcast and Print Media Public Forums Publications Electronic Applications Broadcast and Print Media Public Forums

26 Report OralWritten InformPersuadeInformPersuade Audience Within the Health Care System FriendlyNeutral Outside the Health Care System HostileFriendlyNeutralHostile Form Purpose Direction Attitude

27 IMMRAD If the purpose is to inform, the standard formula for the scientific report is

28 SOCO FirstMiddleLast Most important things first... move to details If the purpose is to persuade, the standard formula for the scientific report is

29 SOCO Supporting Evidence SOCO Citation of Authority SOCO Elements of Persuasion SOCO SOCO Single Overriding Communication Objective

30 Intro- duction SOCO Supporting Evidence SOCO Case Studies SOCO Etc. SOCO To InformTo Persuade M&M Results Discussion Audience’s Attention Span IMRADSOCO Introduction, Materials and Methods, Results and DiscussionSingle Over-Riding Communication Objective Figure 1. Architecture of Scientific Presentations

31 Where is the wisdom we have lost in knowledge? Where is the knowledge we have lost in information? T. S. Eliot Where is the information we have lost in data? CDC Editors Where is the wisdom we have lost in knowledge? Where is the knowledge we have lost in information? T. S. Eliot Where is the information we have lost in data? CDC Editors


Download ppt "Science and Art in Public Health: The Struggle to Turn Sows’ Ears into Silk Purses R. Elliott Churchill, MS, MA Centers for Disease Control and Prevention."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google