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25 The United States in World War II QUIT CHAPTER OBJECTIVE INTERACT WITH HISTORY INTERACT WITH HISTORY TIME LINE VISUAL SUMMARY SECTION Mobilizing for.

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Presentation on theme: "25 The United States in World War II QUIT CHAPTER OBJECTIVE INTERACT WITH HISTORY INTERACT WITH HISTORY TIME LINE VISUAL SUMMARY SECTION Mobilizing for."— Presentation transcript:

1 25 The United States in World War II QUIT CHAPTER OBJECTIVE INTERACT WITH HISTORY INTERACT WITH HISTORY TIME LINE VISUAL SUMMARY SECTION Mobilizing for Defense 1 SECTION The War for Europe and North Africa 2 SECTION The War in the Pacific 3 SECTION The Home Front 4 MAP GRAPH

2 25 HOME CHAPTER OBJECTIVE To understand the military campaigns, political decisions, and efforts on the home front that won World War II The United States in World War II

3 25 W I T H H I S T O R Y I N T E R A C T How can the United States use its resources to achieve victory? Examine the Issues It is December of After Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor, the U.S. has entered the war. As a citizen, you and millions like you must mobilize a depressed peacetime country for war. The United States must produce the workers, soldiers, weapons, and equipment that will help to win the war. What sacrifices will you and your family be willing to make? How can the government encourage businesses to convert to wartime production? HOME How can the military attract recruits? The United States in World War II

4 25 The United StatesThe World 1941 Hitler invades the Soviet Union The Japanese bomb Pearl Harbor. A. Philip Randolph demands that war industries hire African Americans Roosevelt creates the War Production Board to coordinate mobilization. Japanese Americans are sent to relocation centers In the Pacific, the Battle of Midway turns the tide in favor of the Allies. Nazis develop the "final solution" for exterminating Jews Zoot-suit riots rock Los Angeles Rommel’s forces surrender in North Africa U.S. Marines take Iwo Jima. Harry S. Truman becomes president when Roosevelt dies Nazi retreat begins after the Battle of the Bulge. Japan surrenders after atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. TIME LINE HOME 1944 GI Bill of Rights is passed. President Roosevelt is elected to a fourth term On June 6, the Allies launch D-Day, a massive invasion of Europe. The United States in World War II

5 1 Mobilizing for Defense The United States enters the war and mobilizes its citizens and resources to give its allies unprecedented military and industrial support. OVERVIEW ASSESSMENT KEY IDEA HOME

6 1 Mobilizing for Defense OVERVIEW Following the attack on Pearl Harbor, the United States mobilized for war. Military industries in the United States today are a major part of the American economy. MAIN IDEA WHY IT MATTERS NOW TERMS & NAMES HOME War Production Board (WPB) Manhattan Project A. Philip Randolph Office of Price Administration (OPA) Women’s Auxiliary Army Corp (WAAC) rationing George Marshall ASSESSMENT

7 1 Mobilizing for Defense 1. List four ways that America prepared for war. continued... Preparation for War, HOME ASSESSMENT Industries geared up for wartime production. Creation of WAAC Employment of women in the war industry Establishment of OPA and WPB

8 1 Mobilizing for Defense 2. How did government regulations impact the lives of civilians? ANSWER Rationing forced people to use resources wisely or do without some goods. Gas rationing forced people to carpool or walk to work. A “black market” developed that illegally sold scarce goods. HOME ASSESSMENT End of Section 1

9 2 The War for Europe and North Africa The United States, Great Britain, and the Soviet Union cooperate in the fight to defeat Germany and its allies. OVERVIEW ASSESSMENT KEY IDEA HOME MAP

10 2 HOME OVERVIEW Allied forces, led by the United States and Great Britain, battled Axis powers for control of Europe and North Africa. During World War II, the United States assumed a leading role in world affairs that continues today. MAIN IDEA WHY IT MATTERS NOW TERMS & NAMES ASSESSMENT Omar Bradley George Patton Harry S. Truman Dwight D. Eisenhower Battle of the Bulge D-Day V-E Day The War for Europe and North Africa MAP

11 2 1. List the major events influencing the fighting in Europe and North Africa. continued... Jan. 31, 1943 Germans surrender at Stalingrad. HOME ASSESSMENT Dec. 22, 1941 Churchill and Roosevelt meet at the White House. The War for Europe and North Africa May 1944 Battle of Anzio ends. July 1944 Russians liberate first death camp. May 8, 1945 Germany surrenders. May 1943 Last of Afrika Korps surrenders. June 6, 1944 Allies invade Normandy. January 1945 Germany loses Battle of the Bulge. Event Two Event One Event FourEvent SixEvent Eight Event Three Event FiveEvent Seven MAP

12 2 2. Do you agree with the decision made by Roosevelt and Churchill to require unconditional surrender by the Axis powers? Why or why not? Think About: ANSWER Agree: Hitler had to be crushed completely so that he would not have the opportunity to rebuild his army. Disagree: If something less than unconditional surrender were required, the bloodshed would stop earlier and fewer Allied soldiers would be killed. the advantages of defeating a foe decisively the advantages of ending a war quickly how other conflicts, such as the Civil War and World War I, ended HOME ASSESSMENT continued... The War for Europe and North Africa MAP

13 2 3. When President Roosevelt’s body was brought by train to Washington, Betty Conrad was among the servicewomen who escorted his casket. “ The body in the casket was not only our leader but the bodies of all the men and women who had given their lives for freedom. They must not and will not have died in vain.” What did Roosevelt’s body symbolize to Betty Conrad? ANSWER Roosevelt’s body symbolized the bodies of all the men and women who had given their lives for freedom. HOME ASSESSMENT End of Section 2 The War for Europe and North Africa MAP

14 3 The War in the Pacific America wages an aggressive military campaign against Japan in the Pacific Islands and finally ends the war. OVERVIEW ASSESSMENT KEY IDEA HOME

15 3 The War in the Pacific HOME TERMS & NAMES Chester Nimitz Battle of Midway Nuremberg trials J. Robert Oppenheimer Douglas MacArthur Nagasaki Hiroshima kamikaze ASSESSMENT OVERVIEW In order to defeat Japan and end the war in the Pacific, the United States unleashed a terrible new weapon, the atomic bomb. Countries of the modern world struggle to find ways to prevent the use of nuclear weapons. MAIN IDEA WHY IT MATTERS NOW

16 3 The War in the Pacific 1. List the key military actions in the Pacific during World War II and note the significance of each. continued... Doolittle’s raid Japanese victory destroyed the myth of white supremacy in Asia. American spirits lifted by the Tokyo bombing. Damaged Japanese air power Philippines Midway HOME ASSESSMENT Military ActionSignificance Leyte GulfReduced Japanese navy to minor role OkinawaAllowed attack on Japan itself HiroshimaAmerica is first to use the atomic bomb. NagasakiLed to Japan’s surrender

17 3 The War in the Pacific 2. At the trials, many Nazis defended themselves by saying they were only following orders. What does this rationale tell you about the German military? Why was it important to negate this justification? ANSWER Soldiers observed the German military tradition of following orders issued by commanding officers. It is important to negate this point of view to stress the importance of individual responsibility. HOME ASSESSMENT continued...

18 3 The War in the Pacific 3. Explain how the United States was able to defeat the Japanese in the Pacific. ANSWER The United States followed an island-by-island strategy of winning territory back from Japan. With each victory, Allied forces moved closer to Japan. HOME ASSESSMENT continued...

19 3 The War in the Pacific 4. Is it legitimate to hold people accountable for crimes committed during wartime? Why or why not? Think About: ANSWER POSSIBLE RESPONSES: Legitimate—People should be prosecuted for committing atrocities as much during war time as during peacetime. Not Legitimate—In war, people are expected to kill the enemy. Ordinary laws do not apply during wartime. the laws that govern society the likelihood of conducting a fair trial HOME ASSESSMENT End of Section 3 the behavior of soldiers, politicians, and civilians during war

20 4 The Home Front Americans begin to adjust to new economic opportunities and continuing social problems after World War II. KEY IDEA OVERVIEW ASSESSMENT HOME GRAPH

21 4 The Home Front HOME TERMS & NAMES GI Bill of Rights Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) Japanese American Citizens League (JACL) internment James Farmer ASSESSMENT OVERVIEW After World War II, Americans adjusted to new economic opportunities and harsh social tensions. Economic opportunities afforded by World War II led to a more diverse middle class in the United States. MAIN IDEA WHY IT MATTERS NOW GRAPH

22 4 The Home Front 1. List the advances and problems in the economy and in civil rights during World War II. continued... HOME ASSESSMENT Low unemployment, rising crop prices, opportunities for women More equality in the military, founding of CORE Economy Civil Rights Shortage of housing and food, rationing Segregation, discrimination, race riots in Detroit and Los Angeles; internment of Japanese Americans AdvancesProblems GRAPH

23 4 The Home Front 2. How were the experiences of African Americans, Mexican Americans, and Japanese Americans similar during World War II? How were they different? continued... ANSWER Similar: All three groups suffered from discrimination. Different: Japanese Americans living on the West Coast were forced into internment camps. HOME ASSESSMENT GRAPH

24 4 The Home Front 3. Do you think that the government’s policy of evacuating Japanese Americans to camps was justified on the basis of “military necessity”? Explain your answer. continued... ANSWER POSSIBLE RESPONSES: Yes: The United States government had no way of telling with certainty that Japanese citizens were loyal. No: There was no proof that Japanese Americans were disloyal to their country. HOME ASSESSMENT GRAPH

25 4 The Home Front 4. What effect did World War II have on American families? Think About: ANSWER The war changed traditional gender roles as women enlisted in the armed forces and took jobs outside the home. The war also reinforced the country’s long- standing policy of discrimination against minorities. the role of women in families and the economy the relationship between the races the impact of the federal government on society End of Section 4 HOME ASSESSMENT GRAPH


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