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It’s Time. Fargo’s Plan to End Long Term Homelessness January 10, 2006.

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Presentation on theme: "It’s Time. Fargo’s Plan to End Long Term Homelessness January 10, 2006."— Presentation transcript:

1 It’s Time. Fargo’s Plan to End Long Term Homelessness January 10, 2006

2 Purpose & Method Develop a plan to end long term homelessness in 10 years. Develop a plan to end long term homelessness in 10 years. Plan development to be guided by a working group made up of a cross- section of community stakeholders and interested parties. Plan development to be guided by a working group made up of a cross- section of community stakeholders and interested parties. Specific strategies in the plan will focus on what can be accomplished within the City of Fargo. Specific strategies in the plan will focus on what can be accomplished within the City of Fargo.

3 About the Process Meeting #1: Framing the Issue, January 10 Meeting #1: Framing the Issue, January 10 Understanding homelessness Understanding homelessness Understanding the market Understanding the market Understanding the landscape Understanding the landscape Begin to set direction Begin to set direction Meeting #2: Brainstorming solutions, February 22 Meeting #2: Brainstorming solutions, February 22 Refine list of identified system strengths & weaknesses Refine list of identified system strengths & weaknesses Brainstorm ideas to fill local gaps and review peer solutions that address gaps identified in FM Brainstorm ideas to fill local gaps and review peer solutions that address gaps identified in FM 1st attempt at prioritization - strategies we should pursue 1st attempt at prioritization - strategies we should pursue Discuss performance measures- definition of “success” Discuss performance measures- definition of “success” Meeting #3: Developing a Comprehensive Strategy, April 4 Meeting #3: Developing a Comprehensive Strategy, April 4 Refine strategies Refine strategies Explore feasibility – what will it take to make this plan a reality? Explore feasibility – what will it take to make this plan a reality? Funding Funding Logistics (site, etc) Logistics (site, etc) Political will and community support Political will and community support Meeting #4: Reviewing the Direction Set, May 2 Meeting #4: Reviewing the Direction Set, May 2 Carryover discussion from Mtg #3 Carryover discussion from Mtg #3 Review draft plan Review draft plan Plan the Release Plan the Release

4 A very specific goal… Preventing / ending chronic homelessness is not identical with ending poverty or promoting economic self sufficiency Preventing / ending chronic homelessness is not identical with ending poverty or promoting economic self sufficiency Does long term homelessness exist in Fargo and should we work to end it? Does long term homelessness exist in Fargo and should we work to end it? “Preventing Chronic Homelessness – What works?” Deborah Dennis, Policy Research Associates

5 What is Long Term Homelessness? (LTH) Homeless individual or family Homeless individual or family With a disabling condition With a disabling condition Continuously homeless for at least 1 year or has experienced 4 or more episodes of homelessness in the last 3 years. Continuously homeless for at least 1 year or has experienced 4 or more episodes of homelessness in the last 3 years. Note: Local v. Federal Definition Note: Local v. Federal Definition

6 What is a “disabling” condition? Physical, mental or other health conditions that limit the kind or amount of work you can do or that limit your daily activities Physical, mental or other health conditions that limit the kind or amount of work you can do or that limit your daily activities Conditions that interfere with memory or daily decision making Conditions that interfere with memory or daily decision making

7 Ending homelessness requires different solutions for different subpopulations Shelter days consumedNeeded Solution Chronically homeless Stay for a “long time” 2.27 stays for 637 days  Permanent supportive housing Episodically homeless 4-5 stays (a lot of time but not in 1 block) 4.85 stays for 263 days  “Low demand” or harm reduction models  Residential treatment/transitional housing Transitionally homeless 1-2 stays (2-60 days) 1.36 stays for 58 days  Prevention  Help for a quick return to housing Stats are based on cluster distribution of single homeless adults in New York, Corporation for Supportive Housing

8 About the Local Homeless Population

9 The Counting process Point in time Point in time Local Coalition sponsored survey (the “Wilder Survey”) Local Coalition sponsored survey (the “Wilder Survey”) Conversion of snapshot counts to “Annual estimate” Conversion of snapshot counts to “Annual estimate” Calculation of “Unmet need” Calculation of “Unmet need”

10 Homeless individuals in Fargo – recent data sources 2000 Wilder Survey - 199 2000 Wilder Survey - 199 2004 Wilder Survey – 228 2004 Wilder Survey – 228 2005 Point in Time Survey – 249 (chronic homeless – 66) 2005 Point in Time Survey – 249 (chronic homeless – 66) 2005 Annual Estimate – 905 (chronic homeless – 114) 2005 Annual Estimate – 905 (chronic homeless – 114)

11 Homelessness in Metro area Wilder Research Center, November 2004

12 ND Regions

13 Distribution of Homelessness by Region (surveys & indiv) # of Surveys Adults (age 18+) Children (<18 years old) Total Indiv % of total homeless pop % of total ND pop* Region 1 17202223%4% Region 2 272922518%13% Region 3 00000%7% Region 4 1191233315624%14% Region 5 1922024724938%26% Region 6 24232254%9% Region 7 80824212419%21% Region 8 21 7284%6% Total ND 480500155655 * Based on July 1, 2003 Census Bureau estimate of county populations

14 27% of PIT survey respondents were “chronically” homeless 2005 Point in Time survey

15 More than half of the state’s chronic homeless population lives in Region 5

16 Chronic Homelessness by Region Region NumberPercent Region 143% Region 222% Region 41713% Region 57155% Region 61713% Region 71512% Region 832%

17 Basic characteristics of Fargo’s homeless population Age. 2/3 are men, with an average age of 42.1. The average age of a homeless woman in Fargo is 33.6. Age. 2/3 are men, with an average age of 42.1. The average age of a homeless woman in Fargo is 33.6. Marital Status. Approximately half of those interviewed have never married. Marital Status. Approximately half of those interviewed have never married. Veterans. Veterans make up 29% of homeless males in Fargo. Veterans. Veterans make up 29% of homeless males in Fargo. Residency. 46% of homeless persons in Fargo have lived in ND for at least 2 years. The 54% that are more “recent” residents are most likely to come to ND from Minnesota (52%) or have lived in ND before (44%). Residency. 46% of homeless persons in Fargo have lived in ND for at least 2 years. The 54% that are more “recent” residents are most likely to come to ND from Minnesota (52%) or have lived in ND before (44%). Children. 20% of the women in sheltered locations had at least one child with them. Children. 20% of the women in sheltered locations had at least one child with them. Race/Ethnicity. Fargo’s homeless population contains a disproportionate number of persons of color. 28% of Fargo’s homeless adults are persons of color – 21% of the total are American Indian. Race/Ethnicity. Fargo’s homeless population contains a disproportionate number of persons of color. 28% of Fargo’s homeless adults are persons of color – 21% of the total are American Indian. Wilder Research Center, November 2004

18 Basic characteristics (cont.) Unsheltered. Three out of four “unsheltered” homeless were men and almost half were American Indian. Unsheltered. Three out of four “unsheltered” homeless were men and almost half were American Indian. Duration of Homelessness. 60% of the unsheltered homeless have been homeless for more than 6 months – 46% of those living in sheltered locations have been homeless for that length of time. Duration of Homelessness. 60% of the unsheltered homeless have been homeless for more than 6 months – 46% of those living in sheltered locations have been homeless for that length of time. Education. Almost 80% of Fargo’s homeless population has a high school diploma or GED – 27% have attended at least some college. Education. Almost 80% of Fargo’s homeless population has a high school diploma or GED – 27% have attended at least some college. Employment. 41% of homeless persons in Fargo are employed – 18% in a full time status. For those who are not working, the most common barriers are Employment. 41% of homeless persons in Fargo are employed – 18% in a full time status. For those who are not working, the most common barriers are transportation (42%) transportation (42%) lack of housing (29%) lack of housing (29%) personal reasons (27%) personal reasons (27%) physical health problems (25%) physical health problems (25%) mental health problems (22%) mental health problems (22%) Wilder Research Center, November 2004

19 Basic characteristics (cont.) Affordability of Housing Affordability of Housing 54% of homeless persons surveyed said they could pay something for rent but no more than $300 per month (including utilities). 54% of homeless persons surveyed said they could pay something for rent but no more than $300 per month (including utilities). 25% of people surveyed could not afford to pay anything for rent. 25% of people surveyed could not afford to pay anything for rent. Only 6% could afford the typical rent for an apartment of the size they would need. Only 6% could afford the typical rent for an apartment of the size they would need. Wilder Research Center, November 2004

20 Basic characteristics (cont.) Health and well being Health and well being 41% of homeless adults in Fargo were told by a doctor in the last two years that they have a serious mental illness.[1] 41% of homeless adults in Fargo were told by a doctor in the last two years that they have a serious mental illness.[1][1] 50% of homeless adults report that they consider themselves to be alcoholic or chemically dependent. 50% of homeless adults report that they consider themselves to be alcoholic or chemically dependent. 28% of the homeless population in Fargo has received in-patient drug/alcohol treatment in the last 2 years. 28% of the homeless population in Fargo has received in-patient drug/alcohol treatment in the last 2 years. 27% of homeless adults have been dually diagnosed by a doctor in the last 2 years as having both a mental illness and a chemical dependency problem. 27% of homeless adults have been dually diagnosed by a doctor in the last 2 years as having both a mental illness and a chemical dependency problem. [ 1][ 1] Mental illness as referenced in this survey includes: schizophrenia, manic- depression or bipolar disorder, some other type of delusional disorder, major depression, anti-social personality disorder or post-traumatic stress disorder. [ 1] Wilder Research Center, November 2004

21 Characteristics of ND Homeless Population (by chronic status) Characteristic Chronic Homeless Non-Chronic Homeless Mental illness50%27% History of substance abuse73%40% Medical problems38%21% Money management problems54%27% Developmental disabilities13%5% Discharged from medical hospital8%3% Discharged from psychiatric hospital12%7% Can’t locate an apartment9%15% 2005 ND Point in Time survey

22 Veteran Status (by chronic status)

23 Source of income (by chronic status) Source of Income Chronic Homeless Non-Chronic Homeless SSI18%3% Food stamps11%20% Veteran’s benefits11%5% Asking for money on street5%2% Social Security14%8% Pension3%1% 2005 ND Point in Time survey

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26 Primary reasons for Homelessness (by chronic status) Primary Reason Chronic Homeless Non-Chronic Homeless Mental illness34%13% History of substance abuse48%25% Developmental disabilities7%1% Welfare issues4%- Medical problems12%5% Relocation/moved here5%11% 2005 ND Point in Time survey

27 Precariously housed – Households At Risk People at risk of becoming homeless represent the “front door” to homelessness People at risk of becoming homeless represent the “front door” to homelessness Approximately 10% of households with income at or below poverty level cycle through the homeless system in a given year Approximately 10% of households with income at or below poverty level cycle through the homeless system in a given year

28 Are there leading indicators? Eviction Eviction Foreclosure Foreclosure Food poverty Food poverty Energy assistance Energy assistance Other prevention services Other prevention services

29 How can chronic homelessness be prevented? Identify risk and protective factors to help prevent chronic homelessness among persons at risk Identify risk and protective factors to help prevent chronic homelessness among persons at risk Use evidence-based practices to prevent chronic homelessness Use evidence-based practices to prevent chronic homelessness “Preventing Chronic Homelessness – What works?” Deborah Dennis, Policy Research Associates

30 Who is chronically homeless? Primary contributing factors Primary contributing factors Substance Abuse Substance Abuse Serious Mental Illness with inconsistent use of medications/treatment Serious Mental Illness with inconsistent use of medications/treatment Unemployable or unable to keep a job because of disability Unemployable or unable to keep a job because of disability Poor rental history or criminal background Poor rental history or criminal background Wilder Research Center, FM Regional Survey, Nov 2004

31 Risk factors for chronic homelessness Chronic health condition Chronic health condition Mental illness Mental illness Substance abuse disorders Substance abuse disorders Limited or no social support network Limited or no social support network Very low or no income Very low or no income Discharge from jail, prison, hospital, shelter, detox, treatment, foster care Discharge from jail, prison, hospital, shelter, detox, treatment, foster care “Preventing Chronic Homelessness – What works?” Deborah Dennis, Policy Research Associates

32 Evidence-based prevention practices Housing subsidies Housing subsidies Primary predictor of housing stability, regardless of level of disability Primary predictor of housing stability, regardless of level of disability Eviction prevention Eviction prevention Rep payees/other financial mgmt interv Rep payees/other financial mgmt interv Landlord/tenant mediation Landlord/tenant mediation Respite for family caregivers Respite for family caregivers Emergency rent/utility payments Emergency rent/utility payments Discharge/transition planning Discharge/transition planning “Preventing Chronic Homelessness – What works?” Deborah Dennis, Policy Research Associates

33 Summary: The local homeless population Is the picture painted by the local data correct? Is the picture painted by the local data correct? Additions? Additions? Modifications? Modifications? Enhancements? Enhancements?

34 The Local Housing Market

35 The Housing Market Public Housing New or Existing? Housing for Rent Attached or Detached? Which neighborhood? “Move-up” Housing Own or Rent? Special Needs Housing Starter Homes Luxury Living Subsidized or Market rate? What can I afford?

36 How does this fit in the Affordable Housing discussion Workforce housing Workforce housing Extremely low income households (i.e., poverty level incomes) Extremely low income households (i.e., poverty level incomes) Precariously housed Precariously housed Homeless Homeless

37 Insert housing matrix…

38 Homeless Housing Beds by type of occupancy, 2005 Type of Occupancy/ Project Emerg Shelter Men Emerg Shelter Women, Children Trans Hous Fam Trans Hous Non- fam Perm Supp Hous Fam Perm Hous Non- fam SRO (S+C)22 S+C (FHRA)6213 Sister’s Path (LIHTC, SHP) 33 Dakotah Pioneer (LIHTC) 31 Vets Manor (SHP)11 New Life Center89120 YWCA65352 Perry Center1013 Total 89 (beds) 65 (beds) 46 (beds) 66 (beds) 95 (beds) 46 (beds) *The FHRA was awarded 11 additional S+C units in the 2005 CoC grant, expected online in 2006. *A 48 bed homeless veterans project is currently under development by Centre, Inc. and the VA.

39 Assisted Rental Housing, 2003 Type of Occupancy/Project0BR1BR2BR3 BR4BRTotal Vac Rate General Occupancy Low Inc Housing Tax Credit013643022110797 6.3% Public Housing001047223196 <1% Sec 8 Mod Rehab2601812092 4.2% HUD 236/Section 870136400183 4.2% Subtotal – General Occupancy 9196688345331,268 Senior & Disabled Low Inc Housing Tax Credit09850094 <1% Public Housing03702120393 <1% HUD 231/Section 8090000 2% HUD 202/Section 8750000 2% Sec 221(d)(4)/Section 803920041 2% Subtotal – Senior & Disabled 7550810820693 Section 8 – Existing1,104 n/a Total84704796347333,065 Source: “Housing Study Update - City of Fargo”, Community Partners Research (April 2004) *Most of the projects in this table, except Low Income Housing Tax Credit, are considered “deep subsidy” units, meaning that rent is based on 30% of tenant income.

40 When measured in constant dollars, rents in Fargo have actually declined slightly in the last 30 years % median gross rent in national brackets Median Gross rent in 1999 dollars Rent in National Lowest 20% Rent in National Middle 60% Rent in National Top 20% 1970$45523.6%57.9%18.5% 1980$46124.1%64.9%11.0% 1990$45329.8%66.7%3.5% 2000$45330.8%64.2%5.0% Median Household Gross Rent 1970-2000, Source: SOCDS Census Data

41 Housing Affordability is a relative concept 12% of households in Fargo report incomes below the poverty level (i.e., 30% AMI) 12% of households in Fargo report incomes below the poverty level (i.e., 30% AMI) “Affordable” rent for 1 person household (earning 30% AMI) is $328, including utilities “Affordable” rent for 1 person household (earning 30% AMI) is $328, including utilities “Affordable” rent for person with SSI as only income source – approx $164/month (30% of the avg SSI pmt made in ND) “Affordable” rent for person with SSI as only income source – approx $164/month (30% of the avg SSI pmt made in ND) Fair Market Rent – 1 bedroom unit - $412, 0 bedroom unit - $347 Fair Market Rent – 1 bedroom unit - $412, 0 bedroom unit - $347

42 Affordability of housing at the “fair market rent” 2005 Fair Market Rent (FMR) Housing Wage: hourly wage to afford unit at FMR Work hours per week at minimum wage to afford unit at FMR Annual income needed to afford unit at FMR 0 Bedroom $347$6.6752$13,880 1 Bedroom $412$7.9262$16,480 2 Bedrooms $524$10.0878$20,960 3 Bedrooms $756$14.54113$30,240 4 Bedrooms $874$16.81131$34,960 Out of Reach 2004

43 Affordability for poverty level households requires access to “Deep Subsidy” Housing “Deep subsidy” – housing assistance that allows tenant to pay 30% of their income toward rent with the balance covered from another source. “Deep subsidy” – housing assistance that allows tenant to pay 30% of their income toward rent with the balance covered from another source. Section 8 voucher Section 8 voucher Shelter Plus Care program Shelter Plus Care program Public Housing Public Housing Other Other

44 Summary: The Housing Market Is this an accurate assessment of how the local housing market serves the needs of the long term homeless population? Is this an accurate assessment of how the local housing market serves the needs of the long term homeless population? Additions? Additions? Corrections? Corrections? Enhancements? Enhancements? Market strengths? Market weaknesses? Market strengths? Market weaknesses?

45 Provision of Support Services

46 Mainstream Systems: Targeted v. Non-targeted Mainstream Systems are government-funded programs that are intended to meet the critical needs of low income people (services, housing and income supports) Mainstream Systems are government-funded programs that are intended to meet the critical needs of low income people (services, housing and income supports) Non-Targeted programs: designed to serve low income people and/or people with special needs Non-Targeted programs: designed to serve low income people and/or people with special needs Targeted programs: designed to serve homeless people specifically Targeted programs: designed to serve homeless people specifically

47 Why mainstream resources? “…previous research shows that any successful effort to end homelessness must include a combination of services, income supports and housing. “The same research tells us that the most important but under-utilized source of income, housing and services to people who are homeless or at-risk for homelessness are government-funded programs designed to meet the needs of low income people (“mainstream systems”).” Holes in the Safety Net: Mainstream Systems and Homelessness, Chalres and Helen Schwab Foundation, February 2003, page i.

48 FY ’04 HHS Funding for Mainstream and Targeted programs relevant to Chronic Homelessness Overview of HHS programs addressing chronic homelessness, Don Winstead, Deputy Asst Sec for Human Svc Policy, HHS, Dec 2003

49 US Dept of Agriculture Homeless children nutrition program Homeless children nutrition program Child & Adult care food program Child & Adult care food program Commodity supp food program Commodity supp food program Emergency food assistance Emergency food assistance Food stamps Food stamps National school lunch program National school lunch program School breakfast / special milk program School breakfast / special milk program WIC WIC Summer food svc prog Summer food svc prog TargetedNon-Targeted

50 US Dept Health & Human Svc Health care for Homeless Health care for Homeless Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) Runaway & Homeless Youth – Basic Center & Street Outreach Runaway & Homeless Youth – Basic Center & Street Outreach Community Health Centers Community Health Centers Community Svc Block Grant Community Svc Block Grant Head Start Head Start Maternal & Child Health Svc Block Grant Maternal & Child Health Svc Block Grant Medicaid Medicaid Mental Health Performance Partnership Block grant Mental Health Performance Partnership Block grant Migrant Health Centers Migrant Health Centers Ryan White CARE Act Ryan White CARE Act Social Svc Block Grant Social Svc Block Grant State Children’s Health Insurance program State Children’s Health Insurance program Substance Abuse Prevention & Treatment Blk Grant Substance Abuse Prevention & Treatment Blk Grant Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) TargetedNon-Targeted

51 US Dept Housing & Urban Dev Emergency Shelter Grants Emergency Shelter Grants Section 8 Single Room Occupancy Mod Rehab Section 8 Single Room Occupancy Mod Rehab Shelter Plus Care Shelter Plus Care Supportive Housing program Supportive Housing program Community Dev Block Grant Community Dev Block Grant HOME Grant HOME Grant Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA) Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA) Public & Indian Housing Public & Indian Housing Section 8 Project based assistance Section 8 Project based assistance Section 8 Voucher program Section 8 Voucher program Section 811 – Supportive housing for persons with disabilities Section 811 – Supportive housing for persons with disabilities TargetedNon-Targeted

52 US Dept of Labor Homeless Veterans Reintegration project Homeless Veterans Reintegration project Serious & Violent Offender Re-entry initiative Serious & Violent Offender Re-entry initiative Prisoner Re-entry initiative Prisoner Re-entry initiative Ready 4 Work Ready 4 Work Job Corps Job Corps Youth Offender Demonstration grants Youth Offender Demonstration grants Incarcerated Veterans Transition program Incarcerated Veterans Transition program Workforce Investment Act (WIA) Workforce Investment Act (WIA) Career One-Stop system Career One-Stop system America’s Job Bank America’s Job Bank TargetedNon-Targeted

53 US Dept of Education Education for homeless children and youth Education for homeless children and youth Elementary and Secondary Ed Act – Title I, Part A Elementary and Secondary Ed Act – Title I, Part A TargetedNon-Targeted

54 US Social Security Admin NA NA Supplemental Security Income (SSI) Supplemental Security Income (SSI) TargetedNon-Targeted

55 US Dept of Veterans Affairs Domicillary Care for Homeless Veterans Domicillary Care for Homeless Veterans VA Supported Housing VA Supported Housing Homeless providers Grant and per diem program Homeless providers Grant and per diem program Compensated Work Therapy/Transitional Residence Compensated Work Therapy/Transitional Residence Drop-in Centers Drop-in Centers Loan guarantee program for VA multifamily housing Loan guarantee program for VA multifamily housing NA NA TargetedNon-Targeted

56 FEMA Emergency Food & Shelter program Emergency Food & Shelter program NA NA TargetedNon-Targeted

57 The local arena – how are services provided? Emergency shelter Emergency shelter Transitional housing Transitional housing Permanent supportive housing Permanent supportive housing Unsheltered Unsheltered

58 Local service providers: Prevention Housing assistance & basic needs Housing assistance & basic needs Cass County Social services Cass County Social services Rape & Abuse Crisis Center Rape & Abuse Crisis Center SE ND Community Action Agency SE ND Community Action Agency Salvation Army Salvation Army ND Assoc for Disabled ND Assoc for Disabled SE Human Service Center SE Human Service Center YWCA of FM YWCA of FM Emergency Food Pantry Emergency Food Pantry Presentation Partners in Housing Presentation Partners in Housing Central Cities Ministry/Communal Fund Central Cities Ministry/Communal Fund

59 Local service providers: Prevention Education, Counseling & Referral Education, Counseling & Referral SE Human Service Center SE Human Service Center Mental Health Association Mental Health Association Crisis Help Lines (211, First Link) Crisis Help Lines (211, First Link) Village Family Svc Center (Tenant Ed project) Village Family Svc Center (Tenant Ed project) SE ND Community Action SE ND Community Action

60 Local service providers: Outreach Health Care for Homeless Veterans Health Care for Homeless Veterans SE Human Service Center SE Human Service Center Youthworks Youthworks Law Enforcement agencies Law Enforcement agencies Homeless Health Services Homeless Health Services Native American Christian Ministries Native American Christian Ministries Native American Programs Native American Programs Rape & Abuse Crisis Center Rape & Abuse Crisis Center Salvation Army Salvation Army

61 Local Service Providers: Supportive Services Case Management Case Management SEHSC – PATH coordinators SEHSC – PATH coordinators SE ND Community Action SE ND Community Action Salvation Army Salvation Army Youthworks Youthworks ND Association for Disabled ND Association for Disabled Life Skills Life Skills SE ND Community Action SE ND Community Action New Life Center New Life Center Youthworks Youthworks Re-entry for Violent Offenders Re-entry for Violent Offenders

62 Local Service Providers: Supportive Services Alcohol & Drug Abuse Treatment Alcohol & Drug Abuse Treatment SE Human Service Center SE Human Service Center Off Main Off Main ShareHouse & Sister’s Path ShareHouse & Sister’s Path Mental Health Treatment Mental Health Treatment Mental Health Association Mental Health Association SE Human Service Center SE Human Service Center

63 Local Service Providers: Supportive Services Education Education Public Schools – Educ program for homeless children and youth Public Schools – Educ program for homeless children and youth Adult Learning Centers Adult Learning Centers Feed the Children Feed the Children Youthworks Youthworks Veterans Upward Bound Veterans Upward Bound Employment Assistance Employment Assistance Job Service ND Job Service ND SE Human Service Center PATH coord SE Human Service Center PATH coord ND Vocational Rehab ND Vocational Rehab Job Club/Employment Dev (SENDCAA) Job Club/Employment Dev (SENDCAA)

64 Local Service Providers: Supportive Services Child Care Child Care Cass County Social Services Cass County Social Services SE ND Community Action SE ND Community Action Transportation Transportation ND Association for Disabled ND Association for Disabled Job Service ND Job Service ND Veterans Administration Veterans Administration Youthworks Youthworks Metro Transportation Initiative Metro Transportation Initiative Health Care Health Care Cass County Social Services Cass County Social Services Homeless Health Clinic Homeless Health Clinic Family Health Care Family Health Care Good Medicine Indian Health Good Medicine Indian Health

65 Summary: Support Services Is this an accurate picture of the local system for services? Is this an accurate picture of the local system for services? Additions? Additions? Corrections? Corrections? Enhancements? Enhancements? System Strengths? System Weaknesses? System Strengths? System Weaknesses?

66 The Local Landscape

67 Coalitions working on this issue Statewide efforts Statewide efforts Continuum of Care Continuum of Care Interagency Council on Homelessness Interagency Council on Homelessness Local efforts Local efforts FM Area Homeless Coalition FM Area Homeless Coalition Jail Intervention Coordinating Committee Jail Intervention Coordinating Committee

68 Recent projects New Housing New Housing Sister’s Path Sister’s Path Shelter + Care Shelter + Care YWCA Trans Housing YWCA Trans Housing Graver Rehab Graver Rehab Vets Manor Vets Manor Service approaches Service approaches Crisis Intervention Teams Crisis Intervention Teams

69 Federal Sources of Funding - Capital HUD HUD HOME and CDBG HOME and CDBG HOPWA HOPWA Supportive Housing Program (McKinney SHP) Supportive Housing Program (McKinney SHP) Section 811 (supportive housing for persons with disabilities) Section 811 (supportive housing for persons with disabilities) Section 202 (supportive housing for elderly) Section 202 (supportive housing for elderly) Emergency Shelter Grant (ESG) Emergency Shelter Grant (ESG) Low Income Housing Tax Credits Low Income Housing Tax Credits Fed Home Loan Bank Affordable Housing Program (FHLB AHP) Fed Home Loan Bank Affordable Housing Program (FHLB AHP) Veterans Programs Veterans Programs Financing Supportive Housing Capital Sources, Corporation for Supportive Housing, www.csh.org

70 Federal Sources of Funding - Services HUD HUD Supportive Housing Program (McKinney SHP) Supportive Housing Program (McKinney SHP) Shelter Plus Care (S+C) Shelter Plus Care (S+C) Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA) Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA) HHS HHS SAMHSA Mainstream/Block grants SAMHSA Mainstream/Block grants Medicaid Medicaid Ryan White CARE Act programs (Title I & II) Ryan White CARE Act programs (Title I & II) Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) SAMHSA Discretionary Grants SAMHSA Discretionary Grants Health Center Grants for Homeless Populations Health Center Grants for Homeless Populations Transitional Living program for Older Homeless Youth Transitional Living program for Older Homeless Youth Financing Supportive Housing Capital Sources, Corporation for Supportive Housing, www.csh.org

71 Federal Sources of Funding - Services Dept of Education Dept of Education Education for Homeless Children & Youth Education for Homeless Children & Youth Dept of Labor Dept of Labor Veterans’ Employment Program (VWIP) Veterans’ Employment Program (VWIP) Dept of Veteran’s Affairs Dept of Veteran’s Affairs HUD/VA Supported Housing (VASH) HUD/VA Supported Housing (VASH) Financing Supportive Housing Services Sources, Corporation for Supportive Housing, www.csh.org

72 Federal Sources of Funding – Operating HUD HUD Section 8 Vouchers Section 8 Vouchers Shelter Plus Care (S+C) Shelter Plus Care (S+C) Supportive Housing Program (McKinney SHP) Supportive Housing Program (McKinney SHP) Section 8 Mod Rehab Single Room Occupancy (SRO) Section 8 Mod Rehab Single Room Occupancy (SRO) Mainstream Housing Opportunities Mainstream Housing Opportunities HOME HOME Housing Opportunities for People with AIDS (HOPWA) Housing Opportunities for People with AIDS (HOPWA) Financing Supportive Housing Services Sources, Corporation for Supportive Housing, www.csh.org

73 Final Discussion Do we understand the issue? Do we understand the issue? Do we share a vision? Do we share a vision? What are our system’s strengths and vulnerabilities? What are our system’s strengths and vulnerabilities? What are the necessary components of success? What are the necessary components of success? Ideas for forward motion – what do we need that we don’t have (besides $$!) Ideas for forward motion – what do we need that we don’t have (besides $$!)


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