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Chapter 1.5 Time and Motion PART 1 FUNDAMENTALS Copyright © 2011 Thames & Hudson.

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Presentation on theme: "Chapter 1.5 Time and Motion PART 1 FUNDAMENTALS Copyright © 2011 Thames & Hudson."— Presentation transcript:

1 Chapter 1.5 Time and Motion PART 1 FUNDAMENTALS Copyright © 2011 Thames & Hudson

2 PART 1 FUNDAMENTALS Chapter 1.5 Time and Motion Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Introduction  Time and motion are closely linked elements in art  Most of the traditional art media are inherently motionless and timeless  Artists who work in static media have found imaginative ways to indicate the passage of time and the appearance of motion  New technology and media have evolved that allow artists to capture and express time and motion

3 PART 1 FUNDAMENTALS Chapter 1.5 Time and Motion Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Time  Since events necessarily take place over time, any artwork that deals with events must show how time goes by  Artists find ways to depict the passage of time and to remind us of its influence on our lives

4 PART 1 FUNDAMENTALS Chapter 1.5 Time and Motion Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields The Passage of Time  Artists often seek to tell a story

5 1.95 Workshop of the Master of Osservanza (Sano di Pietro?), The Meeting of St. Anthony and St. Paul, c. 1430–35. Tempera on panel, 18½ x 13¼”. National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.

6 1.96 Nancy Holt, Solar Rotary, Aluminum, concrete, and meteorite, approx. height 20’, approx. diameter 24’. University of South Florida

7 PART 1 FUNDAMENTALS Chapter 1.5 Time and Motion Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields The Attributes of Time  Time-based arts, such as film, embody six basic attributes of time: duration, tempo, intensity, scope, setting, and chronology

8 1.97 Thomas Edison and W. K. Dickson, Fred Ott’s Sneeze, Still frames from kinetoscope film. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

9 PART 1 FUNDAMENTALS Chapter 1.5 Time and Motion Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Motion  Motion occurs when an object changes location or position  Because this process occurs as time passes, motion is directly linked to time  To communicate motion without actually making anything move, artists can choose to imply time or, alternatively, create the illusion of time

10 PART 1 FUNDAMENTALS Chapter 1.5 Time and Motion Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Implied Motion  Motion is implied when we do not actually see the motion happening, but visual clues tell us that it is a key aspect of the work

11 1.98 Gianlorenzo Bernini, Apollo and Daphne, 1622–4. Carrara marble, 8’ high. Gallería Borghese, Rome, Italy

12 Click the image above to launch the video PART 1 FUNDAMENTALS Chapter 1.5 Time and Motion Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Gianlorenzo Bernini: The Ecstasy of St. Teresa

13 1.99 Giacomo Balla, Dynamism of a Dog on a Leash, Oil on canvas, 35⅜ x 43¼”. Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York

14 PART 1 FUNDAMENTALS Chapter 1.5 Time and Motion Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Illusion of Motion  When artists imply motion, we do not actually see it occurring  Artists can also communicate the idea of motion by creating an illusion of it  Artists create this illusion through visual tricks that deceive our eyes into believing there is motion as time passes, even though no actual motion occurs

15 1.100 Jenny Holzer, Untitled (Selections from Truisms, Inflammatory Essays, The Living Series, The Survival Series, Under a Rock, Laments, and Child Text), Extended helical tricolor LED, electronic display signboard, site-specific dimensions. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York

16 1.101 Bridget Riley, Cataract 3, PVA on canvas, 7’3¾” x 7’3¾”. British Council Collection

17 PART 1 FUNDAMENTALS Chapter 1.5 Time and Motion Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Stroboscopic Motion  When we see two or more repeated images in quick succession, they tend visually to fuse together

18 Click the image above to launch the video PART 1 FUNDAMENTALS Chapter 1.5 Time and Motion Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Animation

19 1.102 Zoetrope, 19th century. Bill Douglas Centre for the History of Film and Popular Culture, University of Exeter, England

20 1.103 Walt Disney Pictures, frame from Finding Nemo, 2003

21 1.104 Still from Double Indemnity, Billy Wilder, 1944

22 PART 1 FUNDAMENTALS Chapter 1.5 Time and Motion Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Actual Motion  We perceive actual motion when something really changes over time  Performance art is theatrical; the artist’s intention is not to create an art object, but an experience that can exist only in one place and time in history Performance art emerged as a specific form of visual art during the twentieth century Joseph Beuys incorporated everyday objects, such as animals, fat, machinery, and sticks into his Actions, a series of self-performed situations in which the artist would interact with these things in a defined space and time  Kinetic art plays out the passage of time through an art object, usually a sculpture, which moves

23 1.105 Blue Man Group perform at the Venetian Hotel, Las Vegas, Nevada, September 17, 2005

24 1.106 Alexander Calder, Untitled, Aluminum and steel, 29’10⅜” x 75’11¾”. National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.

25 PART 1 FUNDAMENTALS Chapter 1.5 Time and Motion Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Time and Motion in Photography  The work of a photographer is deeply concerned with motion and time  Photographers move around their subject, choosing the right focus for the shot and putting the camera in the best position to capture the image they seek  A photograph freezes a moment in time

26 1.107a–e Dorothea Lange, Destitute Pea Pickers in California. Mother of Seven Children. Age Thirty-two. Nipomo, California, Images a, c–e: Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Image b: Oakland Museum of California

27 1.107a

28 1.107b

29 1.107c

30 1.107d

31 1.107e

32 1.107f Dorothea Lange, Migrant Mother, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

33 PART 1 FUNDAMENTALS Chapter 1.5 Time and Motion Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Natural Processes and the Passage of Time  Some artists use biology and organic materials to create their artwork  Organic materials grow and degrade with the passage of time, so work by “bioartists” is always changing

34 1.108 Adam Zaretsky and Julia Reodica, Workhorse Zoo, Performance at the Salina Art Center, Salina, Kansas

35 1.109 Ron Lambert, Sublimate (Cloud Cover), Water, vinyl, humidifiers, steel, aluminum, and acrylic, dimensions variable

36 PART 1 FUNDAMENTALS Chapter 1.5 Time and Motion Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Conclusion  Artists have been able to incorporate the passage of time and movement into their works using a variety of modern media  Through film and video, we can appreciate the motion of life and have come to experience time in new ways  Television, movies, the Internet, and a multitude of other technologies use movement as an important visual element

37 PART 1 FUNDAMENTALS PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios Chapter 1.5 Time and Motion This concludes the PowerPoint slide set for Chapter 1.5 Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts By Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Copyright © 2011 Thames & Hudson

38 PART 1 FUNDAMENTALS PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios Chapter 1.5 Time and Motion 1.95 National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., Samuel H. Kress Collection, Photo University of South Florida. © Nancy Holt/DACS, London/VAGA, New York Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Prints & Photographs Division, LC-USZ Galleria Borghese, Rome 1.99 Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York, Bequest of A. Conger Goodyear and Gift of George F. Goodyear, © DACS Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Partial gift of the artist, 1989, Photo David Heald © Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York. © ARS, NY and DACS, London Copyright Bridget Riley, All rights reserved Courtesy the Bill Douglas Centre for the History of Cinema and Popular Culture, University of Exeter Disney Enterprises/Album/akg-images Double Indemnity, © Paramount Pictures © Blaine Harrington III/Alamy Photo © B. O’Kane/Alamy. © 2011 Calder Foundation, New York/DACS, London 1.107a Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Prints & Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Collection, LC-USZ b © The Dorothea Lange Collection, Oakland Museum of California, City of Oakland. Gift of Paul S. Taylor 1.107c Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Prints & Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Collection, LC-USF C 1.107d Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Prints & Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Collection, LC-USF C 1.107e Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Prints & Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Collection, LC-USF f Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Prints & Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Collection, LC-DIG-fsa-8b Courtesy the artists © the artist. Courtesy Catherine Person Gallery, Seattle, WA Picture Credits for Chapter 1.5


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