Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Towards Inter- and Multiprofessional Cooperation in Counselling at Comprehensive Schools Päivi Atjonen, Professor Sanna Mäkinen, Researcher Jyri Manninen,

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Towards Inter- and Multiprofessional Cooperation in Counselling at Comprehensive Schools Päivi Atjonen, Professor Sanna Mäkinen, Researcher Jyri Manninen,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Towards Inter- and Multiprofessional Cooperation in Counselling at Comprehensive Schools Päivi Atjonen, Professor Sanna Mäkinen, Researcher Jyri Manninen, Professor University of Joensuu Faculty of Education

2 Empirical Research Context Our empirical focus is on the national project ”Development of guidance and counselling 2008–2010” coordinated by the National Board of Education 148 participating schools, municipalities and regional networks from all over Finland

3  A  Theoretical Viewpoints

4 Inter/Multiprofessional Collaboration Main idea (Leathard 2003) : Traditional cooperation: additive effects = 10  Multiprofessional cooperation: multiplicative effects 2x2x2x2x2 = 32 A good definition: ”The term ’interprofessional collaboration’ is the key term that refers to interaction between the professionals involved, albeit from different backrounds, but who have the same joint goals in working together.” (Leathard 2003)

5 Multi/Interprofessional Cooperation Elements of ”working together” – both a process and a concept (D´Amour et al. 2005) are  sharing  partnership  interdependence  power

6 Interprofessional & Multiprofessional Collaboration & Cooperation 1. Inter/Multi multi, many between, inter, trans 2. Professional profession, occu- pation professional expertise education appreciation identity 3. Collaboration, cooperation: Dynamic and actively developing process Tranforming and trans- formative process Structure for common activities Process of working toget- her, consists of concrete issues such as decision- making, negotiations and compro-mises Includes shared planning and implementation + cooperative activities Opportunities to transcend professional boundaries vs. competition

7 Development of Inter/Multiprofessional Collaboration Levels of “working together” (Leathart 2003; Hall 2005): 1.No direct cooperation between members 2.Formal and occasional cooperation 3.Regular communication, consulting and exchange of information 4.Established and transferable modes of cooperation which are not only person- based but are attached to the structured level 5.Commitment to the multidisciplinary working which is included in the daily policy of planning, implementation and development

8 Cooperation or Collaboration? Winer & Ray 2003

9 Cooperation or Collaboration? Winer & Ray 2003

10 Final Part of the Previous Table Cooperation: Informal, no goals are defined jointly, no planning toget- her, information is shared when need- ed Coordination: Some planning is required and more communication, thus, a closed work- ing relationship is developed Collaboration : Working together, having shared commitments and goals, developed in partnership. Lea- dership, resources, risk, control and results are shared. More accomplished than could have been individually.

11 Multi/Interprofessional Cooperation/Collaboration Our interpretation 1  Cooperation and coordination rather than collaboration better describe ongoing activities in the projects which we are investigating Our interpretation 2  Interprofessional cooperation: teachers, special teachers, student/study counsellors, school welfare officers, principals (= only professionals working inside the educational institution)  Multiprofessional cooperation: social workers, youth workers, counsellors in employment offices, physicians, policemen, priests (= also profes-sionals working outside the school sector)

12 Research Questions How is interprofessional cooperation perceived by persons responsible for the development of counselling at grades 6–9 of the comprehensive school? How is multiprofessional cooperation perceived by persons responsible for the development of counselling at grades 6–9 of the comprehensive school? Are there differences in the inter- and multiprofessional cooperation perceived by the selected subgroups of the respondents?

13  B  Context and Data

14 Research Context Guidance and counselling in the Finnish educational system  Student counsellor in the comprehensive school (lower level, grades 1–6)  Study counsellor in the comprehensive school (upper level, grades 7–9)  The National Core Curriculum for Basic Education: o to support pupils’ growth and development so that they are able to advance their study abilities and social maturity, and to develop knowledge and skills necessary from the standpoint of life-planning pupils reach decisions on studying, training, day-to-day life, and careers on the basis of their own abilities and interests

15 Research Context Various national development projects initiated by the Ministry of Education and the National Board of Education (NBE) Examples (years 2000–):  Evaluation of Educational Guidance and Counselling  Chances  Development of School Counselling  Flexible Basic Education  Participation  Successful Lessons

16 Research Context Our research focus is on the latest & most current national project “Development of guidance and counselling 2008–2010” 148 participating schools, municipalities and regional networks from all over Finland Objectives (stated by the NBE) are to develop…  …local curriculum for counselling  …cooperation with the local employment market & business community  …cooperation between agencies which try to prevent social exclusion and promote the well- being of youth  … cooperation between school and home  …to establish counselling activities as a permanent part of regional or institution-based work

17 Gathering of Data Baseline measurement in September-Octo- ber 2008 – main data for this presentation:  respondents: 442 teachers, study counsellors and a few other professionals associated with guidance & counselling in grades 6–9 (Sept-Oct 2008)  eQuestionnaire: see the next slide

18 Gathering of Data Baseline measurement – main parts of the questionnaire  our focus today is indicated in brown! 1.Background information (8 structured items, 4 open-ended questions) 2.Development work (4 structured items, 1 open- ended question) 3.Current situation in guidance & counselling (2 structured items, 1 open-ended question) 4.Assessment of existing counselling services (30 structured items, 6-point assessment scale) 5.Expectations concerning the newly established project (4 open-ended questions)

19 Gathering of Data Other related data:  148 project proposals put forward by schools and regional organisations in application for money from the Ministry of Education (Spring 2008)  83 revised project proposals (Oct 2008)  112 self-evaluation reports of projects concerning networked counselling services (Oct-Dec 2008) Both quantitative and qualitative analysis Comparisions of subgroups: see next slide Data Analysis

20 Data Analysis: Compared Subgroups (1) female ♀ male ♂ (2) big cities small municipalities (3) member of steering group no member (4) developer at the grass-root level not at the grass-root level (5) developer at a school at the regional level

21  C  Results: Interprofessional Cooperation

22 …working?

23 Interprofessional Cooperation Group comparisons: = = = ♀ = ♂ > Cooperation within school > = higher mean (statistically significant) = means are equal

24 Interprofessional Cooperation Findings from other sets of data: Development proposals (f = 148) and their revised versions (f = 85):  development (Topic 4) and models (Topic 11) for cooperation between the school and home were rarely mentioned Self-evaluation documents (f = 112) of networked counselling services:  cooperation was described as being based on the efforts of study counsellors and principals  shared responsibilities existed between special education teachers and school- based groups of student welfare services  efforts were not always very systematic

25 Interprofessional Cooperation Findings from other sets of data: Development proposals (f = 148) and their revised versions (f = 85) + self-evaluation documents (f = 112) of networked counselling services: The main challenge is to put a holistic model of counselling into practice according to the idea “It is the task of all teachers to guide pupils…” (NBE 2004)

26  C  Results: Multiprofessional Cooperation

27 Respondents’ (n = 442) background

28 Multiprofessional Cooperation …working?

29 Multiprofessional Cooperation …working?

30 Multiprofessional Cooperation Group comparisons: = = = ♀ = ♂ =♀ = ♂ = > = higher mean (statistically significant) = means are equal

31 Multiprofessional Cooperation Factors which may make the project’s work difficult (based on eQuestionnaire) Problems of cooperation (29 % of 843 statements categorised from the open-ended question)  cooperative culture is missing, different practises in different administrative sectors, lack of enthusiasm for genuine cooperation, problems in contacts with the employment market & business community Expectations concerning the project’s future (based on eQuestionnaire) Improvement in cooperation (16 % of 597 state- ments categorised from the open-ended question)  cross-administrative cooperation, connections between schools, and the employment market & business community, cooperation between home and school

32 Multiprofessional Cooperation Findings from other sets of data: Development proposals (f = 148) and their revised versions (f = 85) + self-evaluation documents (f = 112) of networked counselling services: some evidence was found on efforts to develop networks, exchange information and coordinate local guidance services improving cooperation was among the most often mentioned objectives of the newly- established projects

33 Multiprofessional Cooperation Findings from other sets of data: Development proposals (f = 148) and their revised versions (f = 85):  Topic 2: Networking between different parties (shared use of resources, support for pupils with special needs, rehabilitation, guidance at transitions along the students’ learning paths)  Topic 3: Locating regional counselling resources and internal organisation (finding and establishing the good counselling practices which already exist, improving communication systems between different parties, launching new resource centres)  Topic 6: Cooperation with employment market and business communities (increasing pupils’ and teachers’ knowledge of work life, cooperation with local entrepreneurs)  Topic 9: Development of counselling models external to schools (care for drop-outs, cooperation with youth work & workshops)

34 Multiprofessional Cooperation Findings from other sets of data, continues: Self-evaluation documents (f = 112) of networked counselling services:  projects aim at evaluating counselling activities as a part of educational, social and employment policy (activities, indicators, participants, processes)  although some projects used statistics and surveys others did not have any systematic tools for evaluation

35  D  Concluding Remarks

36 CooperationCoordinationCollaboration Inter- professional Multi- professional ++ Inter- and Multiprofessional Cooperation State of current development projects: + satisfactory ++ moderate +++ good There was confirmation of our work hypothesis “Cooperation and coordination better describe ongoing activities of these projects”. Leathart’s level 3 has been reached but the variation is broad.

37 Inter- and Multiprofessional Cooperation Challenges interprofessional cooperation and coordination – according to the holistic model of counselling – works quite well but still needs special attention in the future genuine multiprofessional co-operation still has various obstacles: attitudes, acting parties’ varied educational background, different language and routines, lack of time to get to know each other  shared expertise + multiprofessional cooperation = a challenging combination

38 References D´Amour, D., Ferrada-Videla, M., San Martin Rodriguez, L.& Beaulieu, D. 2005, The conceptual basis for interprofessional collaboration: Core concepts and theoretical frameworks. Journal of Interprofessional Care 19 (S1), 116–131. Hall, P Interprofessional teamwork: Professional cultures as barriers. Journal of Interprofessional Care 19 (S1), 188–196. Leathard, A Interprofessional collaboration. From Policy to Practice in Health and Social Care. New York: Routledge. Winer, M. & Kay, R Collaboration handbook: Creating, sustaining and enjoying the journey. Minnesota: Amherst H. Wilder Foundation.

39 Contact Information Päivi Atjonen Professor Address: University of Joensuu Faculty of Education P.O. Box 111 FIN Finland Sanna Mäkinen, Researcher Address: University of Joensuu Faculty of Education P.O. Box 111 FIN Finland Jyri Manninen Professor Address: University of Joensuu Faculty of Education P.O. Box 111 FIN Finland

40 Publications Mäkinen, S. 2008a. Kohti entistä ehompaa oppilaanohjausta. Vuosia 2008– 2010 koskevien oppilaanohjauksen kehittämissuunnitelmien analyysi. (30 s.) Mäkinen, S. 2008b. Oppilaanohjauksen kehittäminen Ennakko- tuloksia lähtötilannekyselyn avointen vastausten analyysista. (6 s.) Mäkinen, S. 2008c. Tuumasta toimeen. Oppilaanohjauksen tarkennettujen kehittämissuunnitelmien analyysi. laanohjaus/tuumasta_toimeen.pdf (19 s.)http://www.edu.fi/hankkeita/oppi- laanohjaus/tuumasta_toimeen.pdf Atjonen, P Onko ohjaus ohjauksessa? Verkostomaisesti tuotettujen pal- velujen mallin soveltaminen oppilaanohjauksen itsearviointiin. (21 s. + 3l l.) Atjonen, P., Mäkinen, S., Manninen, J. & Vanhalakka-Ruoho, M Menossa ja mukana. Arviointia oppilaanohjauksen kehittämisen tilasta syksyllä sa_ja_mukana.pdf (42 s. + 5 l.)http://www.edu.fi/hankkeita/oppilaanohjaus/menos- sa_ja_mukana.pdf


Download ppt "Towards Inter- and Multiprofessional Cooperation in Counselling at Comprehensive Schools Päivi Atjonen, Professor Sanna Mäkinen, Researcher Jyri Manninen,"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google