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Lesson 4—The Nightingale and the Rose BTLEW Part Three ENTER BTLEW.

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Presentation on theme: "Lesson 4—The Nightingale and the Rose BTLEW Part Three ENTER BTLEW."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Lesson 4—The Nightingale and the Rose BTLEW Part Three ENTER BTLEW

3 Lesson 4—The Nightingale and the Rose BTLEW Text Appreciation I. Text AnalysisText Analysis 1. ThemeTheme 2. StructureStructure 3. Further DiscussionFurther Discussion II. Writing DevicesWriting Devices 1. Genre and SymbolsGenre and Symbols 2. Figurative SpeechesFigurative Speeches a. PersonificationPersonification b. Simile & MetaphorSimile & Metaphor c. Climax & AnticlimaxClimax & Anticlimax 3. Syntactic DevicesSyntactic Devices III. Sentence ParaphraseSentence Paraphrase

4 Lesson 4—The Nightingale and the Rose BTLEW I.Text Analysis The nightingale is the true lover, if there is one. She, at least, is Romance, and the student and the girl are, like most of us, unworthy of Romance. Nightingale sacrifices its own life for pure love’s sake. A true love needs wholehearted devotion and passion. Theme The end of Theme.

5 Lesson 4—The Nightingale and the Rose BTLEW Part 1 (Paras. ): Part 2 (Paras. ): Part 3 (Paras. ): Part 4 (Paras. ): I.Text Analysis Structure Nightingale struck by “the mystery of love” Nightingale looking for a red rose to facilitate the love Nightingale sacrificing her life for a red rose The end of Structure. Student discarding the red rose 46-54

6 Lesson 4—The Nightingale and the Rose BTLEW I.Text Analysis Fairy tale To be continued on the next page.  Question: What genre can this story be categorized into? Optimism Pessimism Fairy tales conclude with the cliché typical of most fairy tales, ‘They all lived happily ever after,’ implying better living circumstances for all. Wilde’s fairy tales have no happy endings. His tales end mostly in unresolved tensions, provoking readers to consider necessary improvements which need to be made within the social order. Even in his most popular tales, the protagonists die. comparison

7 Lesson 4—The Nightingale and the Rose BTLEW I.Text Analysis  To be continued on the next page. red rose—true love, which needs constant nourishment of passions of the lovers. It can be divided into three stages: love in the heart of a boy and a girl; love in the soul of a man and a maid; and love that is perfected by Death, that does not die in the tomb. Lizard—cynic, a person who sees little or no good in anything and who has no belief in human progress; person who shows this by sneering and being contemptuous For Reference Question: What are the symbolic meanings of “Red rose”, “Lizard”, “Butterfly” and “Nightingale”?

8 Lesson 4—The Nightingale and the Rose BTLEW I.Text Analysis  To be continued on the next page. Nightingale—a truthful, devoted pursuer of love, who dares to sacrifice his own precious life For Reference Question: What are the symbolic meanings of “Red rose”, “Lizard”, “Butterfly” and “Nightingale”?

9 Lesson 4—The Nightingale and the Rose BTLEW I.Text Analysis  To be continued on the next page. For reference: The Nightingale is a small brown bird famous for its beautiful sad song. Throughout literary history there are many poems and stories dedicated to the nightingale, including John Keats’ poem Ode to a Nightingale and Oscar Wilde’s children’s story, The Nightingale and the Rose.

10 Lesson 4—The Nightingale and the Rose BTLEW I.Text Analysis Question: What’s Oscar Wilde’s belief on love and art?  To be continued on the next page. Self-comment on his own life “Some said my life was a lie but I always knew it to be the truth; for like the truth was rarely pure and never simple.” Paradoxical, contradictory, well-turned phrase Wildean dichotomy Duality in all aspects fascinates and confuses: the Anglo-Irishman with nationalist sympathies; the protestant with life-long Catholic leanings; the married homosexual; the musician of words and painter of language who confessed that writing bored him… a figure of paradox and contradictio n

11 Lesson 4—The Nightingale and the Rose BTLEW I.Text Analysis To be continued on the next page. “I had genius, a distinguished name, high social position, brilliancy, intellectual daring; I made art a philosophy, and philosophy an art: I altered the minds of men and the colour of things: there was nothing I said or did that did not make people wonder... I treated Art as the supreme reality, and life as a mere mode of fiction: I awoke the imagination of my century so that it created myth and legend around me: I summed up all systems in a phrase, and all existence in an epigram.” a figure of paradox and contradictio n

12 Lesson 4—The Nightingale and the Rose BTLEW I.Text Analysis To be continued on the next page. "Better to have loved and lost, than to have never loved at all." —St. Augustine "There is no remedy for love but to love more." —Thoreau "To love and win is the best thing. To love and lose, the next best." —William M. Thackeray "As the ocean is never full of water, so is the heart never full of love." —Anonymous One should always be in love. That is the reason one should never marry. —Oscar Wilde To love oneself is the beginning of a life-long romance. —Oscar Wilde A man can be happy with any woman as long as he does not love her. —Oscar Wilde Young men want to be faithful and are not; old men want to be faithless and cannot. —Oscar Wilde Comparativ e Study of Quotes on Love Optimism Pessimism

13 Lesson 4—The Nightingale and the Rose BTLEW I.Text Analysis To be continued on the next page. Pessimism About the Future “Yes: I am a dreamer. For a dreamer is one who can only find his way by moonlight, and his punishment is that he sees the dawn before the rest of the world.”

14 Lesson 4—The Nightingale and the Rose BTLEW I.Text Analysis Question: What do you think is the Wildean attitude toward love, romance, art and philosophy? To be continued on the next page. Content (Three stages of love) Form (The beauty of language) 

15 Lesson 4—The Nightingale and the Rose BTLEW I.Text Analysis To be continued on the next page. For reference: The nightingale is the true lover, if there is one. She, at least, is Romance, and the Student and the girl are, like most of us, unworthy of Romance. So, at least, it seems to me, but I like to fancy that there may be many meanings in the tale, for in writing it I did not start with an idea and clothe it in form, but began with a form and strove to make it beautiful enough to have many secrets and many answers. (Wilde’s comments in a letter to one of his friends) Form Content 

16 Lesson 4—The Nightingale and the Rose BTLEW I.Text Analysis To be continued on the next page. For reference: His fairy tales have been described as “poems in prose”. an appreciation of beautiful things And the marvelous rose became crimson, like the rose of the eastern sky. Crimson was the girdle of its petals, and crimson as a ruby was the heart… then she gave one last burst of music. The white moon heard it, and she forgot the dawn, and lingered on in the sky. The red rose heard it and trembled all over with ecstasy, and opened its petals to the cold morning air. 

17 Lesson 4—The Nightingale and the Rose BTLEW I.Text Analysis To be continued on the next page. “Death is a great price to pay for a red rose…” “It is more precious than emeralds, and dearer than fine opals. Pearls and pomegranates cannot buy it, nor is it set forth in the market- place. It may not be purchased of the merchants, …” Alliteration: the use of identical consonant with different vowels assonance alliteration Assonance: the resemblance of sound between syllables in nearby words, arising from the rhyming of two or more stressed vowels, but not the consonants For reference: His fairy tales have been described as “poems in prose”. 

18 Lesson 4—The Nightingale and the Rose BTLEW I.Text Analysis To be continued on the next page. For reference: head vs. heart The Student’s one-sided preference for word knowledge over emotions is clear from the moment he first sees the rose. “It is so beautiful,” he says, “that I am sure it has a long Latin name.” The Student, the young woman, and their society are all one-sided psychically. They have devalued the “capacity to love”, here symbolized by both the Nightingale and the rose. 

19 Lesson 4—The Nightingale and the Rose BTLEW I.Text Analysis Question: What are the types of sentences mainly found in this story?  simple  short  long  complex To be continued on the next page. 

20 Lesson 4—The Nightingale and the Rose BTLEW I.Text Analysis To be continued on the next page. For reference: head vs. heart The relationship of head and heart is a central concern of Wilde's fairy tales. Promising to provide the red rose "out of music by moonlight" and to "stain it with my own heart’s blood," the Nightingale asks of the Student only that he "will be a true lover, for Love is wiser than Philosophy, though she is wise, and mightier than Power, though he is mighty." But the Student cannot understand what the Nightingale says, "for he only knew the things that are written down in books.” He has too much "head" knowledge and almost no "heart" knowledge. 

21 Lesson 4—The Nightingale and the Rose BTLEW Question: The story is written in  concrete style (mostly nouns and few adjectives)  flowery style (very descriptive with adjectives) I.Text Analysis The end of Questions. 

22 Lesson 4—The Nightingale and the Rose BTLEW Why is it so important for the student to have a red rose? Why is the Nightingale so determined to get the student a red rose? Why is a rose so hard to get? Why is the Nightingale so persistent in shedding its blood for the student? Is love better than life as is believed by the Nightingale? Do you believe in true love? Why or why not? Comment on Wilde’s attitude to Love, Romance. I.Text Analysis Further Discussion About the Text The end of Further Discussion.

23 Lesson 4—The Nightingale and the Rose BTLEW II.Writing Devices Fairy tales are full of imagery and symbols. Find imagery and symbols in this text. Genre and Symbols jewels (gems, precious stones): emeralds, opal, ruby, sapphire, diamond, jade plants: daisy, rose, oak-tree, daffodil animals: nightingale, lizard, butterfly subjects: philosophy, metaphysics, logic stringed instruments: harp, violin The end of Genre and Symbols.

24 Lesson 4—The Nightingale and the Rose BTLEW II.Writing Devices “She has form, that cannot be denied but has she got feeling? I am afraid not. In fact, she is like most artists; she is all style without any sincerity. She would not sacrifice herself for others.” he said to himself, as he walked away through the grove. (Para. 34) Personification: give human forms or feelings to animals, or life and personal attributes to inanimate objects, or to ideas and abstractions Personification What effect do you think it has here?

25 Lesson 4—The Nightingale and the Rose BTLEW II.Writing Devices Simile: … her voice was like water bubbling from a silver jar. … as white as the foam of the sea… Metaphor: … and redder than the fans of coral … and the cold crystal moon Simile & Metaphor

26 Lesson 4—The Nightingale and the Rose BTLEW Climax: derived from the Greek word “ladder”, implying the progression of thought at a uniform or almost uniform rate of significance or intensity II.Writing Devices So the Nightingale pressed closer against the thorn, and the thorn touched her heart, and a fierce pang of pain shot through her. Bitter, bitter was the pain, and wilder and wilder grew her song, for she sung of the Love that is perfected by Death, of the Love that dies not in the tomb. Climax & Anticlimax To be continued on the next page. What effect do you think it has here? More Examples

27 Lesson 4—The Nightingale and the Rose BTLEW II.Writing Devices And the marvelous rose became crimson. Crimson was the girdle of pedals, and crimson as ruby was the heart. But the Nightingale’s voice grew fainter and a film came over her eyes. Fainter and fainter grew her song, and she felt choking in her throat. The end of Figurative Speeches. And at noon the Student opened his window and looked out. … “What a wonderful piece of luck!” he cried… he leaned down and plucked it. Anticlimax: stating one’s thoughts in a descending order of significance or intensity, often used to ridicule or satire Climax & Anticlimax

28 Lesson 4—The Nightingale and the Rose BTLEW II.Writing Devices Syntactic Devices Style or manner of expression choice of words grammatical structures length of sentences To be continued on the next page.

29 Lesson 4—The Nightingale and the Rose BTLEW II.Writing Devices Then she gave one last burst of music. The Moon heard it, and she forgot the dawn, and lingered on in the sky. The Red Rose heard it, and trembled all over with ecstasy, and opened its petals in the cold morning air. Concrete verbs Concrete nouns To be continued on the next page. Diction

30 Lesson 4—The Nightingale and the Rose BTLEW II.Writing Devices high Synonym Preciseness? swiftly & smoothly In a stately & confident manner To be continued on the next page. So she spread her brown wings for flight, and soared into the air. She swept over the garden like a shadow, and like a shadow she sailed through the grove.

31 Lesson 4—The Nightingale and the Rose BTLEW II.Writing Devices So the Nightingale pressed closer against the thorn, and the thorn touched her heart, and a fierce pang of pain shot through her. Bitter, bitter was the pain, and wilder and wilder grew her song, for she sung of the Love that is perfected by Death, of the Love that dies not in the tomb. And the marvelous rose became crimson. Crimson was the girdle of pedals, and crimson as ruby was the heart. But the Nightingale’s voice grew fainter and a film came over her eyes. Fainter and fainter grew her song, and she felt choking in her throat. To be continued on the next page. Descriptive adjectives

32 Lesson 4—The Nightingale and the Rose BTLEW II.Writing Devices Inversion … and louder and louder grew her song… Rhetorical Question What is a heart of a bird compared to the heart of a man? Repetition And a delicate flush of pink came into leaves of the rose, like the flush in the face of the bridegroom where he kisses the lips of the bride. Find more examples in the text. To be continued on the next page. Syntactical Structures

33 Lesson 4—The Nightingale and the Rose BTLEW II.Writing Devices Repetition She swept over the garden like a shadow, and like a shadow she sailed through the grove. Bitter, bitter was the pain, and wilder and wilder grew her song. And the marvelous rose became crimson. Crimson was the girdle of pedals, and crimson as ruby was the heart. But the Nightingale’s voice grew fainter… Fainter and fainter grew her song… The end of Writing Devices. Find more examples in the text.

34 Lesson 4—The Nightingale and the Rose BTLEW III.Sentence Paraphrase 1 I have read all that the wise men have written, and all the secrets of philosophy are mine, yet for want of a red rose my life is made wretched. (Para. 3) his nature of taking instead of giving go to 2 The use of “all” stresses perfect mentality the student claims he possesses. The student possesses all the wisdom, yet understands nothing about love.

35 Lesson 4—The Nightingale and the Rose BTLEW III.Sentence Paraphrase 2 But the Nightingale understood the student’s sorrow, and sat silent in the Oak-tree. (Para. 12) subject complement go to 3 More Examples To be continued on the next page.

36 Lesson 4—The Nightingale and the Rose BTLEW III.Sentence Paraphrase back to 2 1.So I shall sit lonely and my heart will break. (Para. 5) 2.Ah, I have read all that the wise men have written… my life is made wretched. (Para. 3)

37 Lesson 4—The Nightingale and the Rose BTLEW III.Sentence Paraphrase 3 What is the heart of a bird compared to the heart of a man? (Para. 28) The heart of a bird is nothing compared to the heart of a man. A question in form but a statement in meaning go to 4

38 Lesson 4—The Nightingale and the Rose BTLEW III.Sentence Paraphrase 4 “She has form,” he said to himself, as he walked away. “That cannot be denied. But has she got feeling? I’m afraid not. In fact, like most artists, she is all style without any sincerity.”(Para. 34) go to 5 The student’s ignorance of what true love is makes him conclude that Nightingale’s last singing is void of feeling and sincerity. design, structure, or pattern of a work of art capacity to experience the higher emotions way in which something is said, done, expressed, or performed nothing but

39 Lesson 4—The Nightingale and the Rose BTLEW III.Sentence Paraphrase 5 … the Love that is perfected by Death, of the Love that dies not in the tomb. (Para. 41) the Love that never dies that does not die in the tomb The end of Sentence Paraphrases.

40 Lesson 4—The Nightingale and the Rose BTLEW Part Three This is the end of Part Three. Please click HOME to visit other parts. HOME


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