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Analyzing the Social Return On Investment in Youth Mentoring & Youth Intervention Programs A Framework for Minnesota.

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Presentation on theme: "Analyzing the Social Return On Investment in Youth Mentoring & Youth Intervention Programs A Framework for Minnesota."— Presentation transcript:

1 Analyzing the Social Return On Investment in Youth Mentoring & Youth Intervention Programs A Framework for Minnesota

2 The Mentoring Partnership of Minnesota and the Minnesota Youth Intervention Programs Association represent more than 500 proven programs delivering a comprehensive support system for 190,000 young people throughout the state each year.

3 Thank you to the following organizations: Center for 4-H & Community Youth Development of the University of Minnesota Extension The Curtis L. Carlson Family Foundation IWCO Direct

4 Before these SROI studies, there had been no formal economic analysis of the costs and benefits of Youth Mentoring and Youth Intervention programs in the state of Minnesota. This study puts forward a framework for quantifying the value and benefits of Mentoring and Intervention programs.

5 What is Social Return On Investment (SROI)? Generic name given to methods of policy analysis that compare public and private benefits and costs Results may be expressed in different ways – Percentage return on investment – Benefit/cost ratio – Net present value of project

6 SROI study goals Provide Mentoring and Intervention Programs with a benefit cost analysis Establish a framework SROI communicating the economic and social benefits to programs, investors, business, government and our communities

7 Program Implications A useful model that has been an effective way to communicate the economic and social impacts of programs for Early Childhood Development Provides SROI data related to comprehensive mentoring and Intervention programs Helps to reinforce the value of quality mentoring and early intervention programs

8 Analyzing the Social Return On Investment in Youth Mentoring & Youth Intervention Programs A Framework for Minnesota

9 Social Return On Investment (SROI) studies conducted by the Wilder Research and the University of Minnesota found that the Mentoring Partnership has a $2.72 SROI for every dollar spent on programs, and comprehensive Youth Intervention Programs have a $4.89 SROI for every dollar spent.

10 Major findings:Youth Mentoring Improved school attendance Reduced truancy Improved health outcomes Reduced juvenile crime Reduced costs of adult crime Reduced need for social services

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12 Mentoring Programs Types of Mentoring One to One School-based Group & Team Peer to Peer E-mentor Types of Programs Community-based School-based Faith-based Business

13 Implications Quality Mentoring Helps: Kids avoid risky behavior, achieve in school and improve social skills Increase opportunities for youth to grow into economically self-sufficient adults Enhance corporate image, improve employee satisfaction, improve team building and leadership skills

14 Major findings: Youth Intervention Reduced truancy Improved school performance Reduced near-term court costs Reduced costs of adult crimes Reduced need for social services Improved health outcomes

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16 Youth Intervention Programs Pre-court diversion programs Restorative justice programs Counseling services Education Prevention services

17 Implications Early Youth Intervention Helps: Kids who are just beginning to show signs of troublesome or illegal behaviors Keep kids out of more costly treatment options and keeps them at home in school and in their community Kids avoid risky behavior, achieve in school and improve social skills Increases opportunities for youth to grow into economically self-sufficient adults

18 Every effective Youth Mentoring and Youth Intervention program that reaches youth at an early age saves millions of dollars in future corrective expenditures and provides strong, prepared citizens in our communities

19 Paul AntonDr. Judy Temple Wilder Research University of Minnesota Analyzing the Social Return On Investment (SROI) analysis of mentoring and youth intervention programs

20 Judy Temple, PhD Associate professor with a joint appointment in the Humphrey Institute and in the Department of Applied Economics at the University of Minnesota

21 What is Social Return On Investment (SROI)? Generic name given to methods of policy analysis that compare public and private benefits and costs Results may be expressed in different ways – Percentage return on investment – Benefit/cost ratio – Net present value of project

22 Put forth a framework for SROI analysis Provide examples that give realistic estimates of the return on mentoring programs and youth intervention programs Recommend additional data collection and retention Purposes of the study

23 What is benefit-cost analysis? Why is BCA useful? Discussion of costs General principles Ways of calculating benefits Examples from early childhood programs The benefit/cost analysis (BCA) was used for both studies

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25 Return on investment studies have had a profound effect in raising awareness of the value of early childhood education Results from studies of the Perry Preschool program and the Chicago Child-Parent Centers show a benefit-cost ratio of more than $7 to $1. These results have led to a large increases in state-funded early education programs in the last 5 years.

26 Benefit/cost analysis is useful for: Informing policymakers Generating support from taxpayers Generating support from the business community

27 Illustrative Example: Representative mentoring program A high-quality one-to-one mentoring program Youth are matched with volunteer mentors who are rigorously screened and trained Mentors commit for a period of a year and meet four times a month with their mentees Youth are helped across a wide spectrum of issues that include social skills, study skills, and work habits Source: Analyzing the Social Return on Investment in Youth Mentoring Programs, Wilder Research, February, 2007

28 Administrative and operating costs$ 1,300 Estimated value of volunteers’ time 2,262 Total resource cost (per student)$ 3,562 Source: Analyzing the Social Return on Investment in Youth Mentoring Programs, Wilder Research, February, 2007 SROI of a representative mentoring program: costs

29 Program Benefits Reduced juvenile crime $ 371 Reduced truancy Reduced school costs 150 Increased graduation rate 3,826 Enhanced school achievement 2,129 Reduced probability of tobacco initiation 823 Reduced probability of illegal drug initiation 127 Mentor satisfaction 2,262 Total benefits (per student) $9,688 Source: Analyzing the Social Return on Investment in Youth Mentoring Programs, Wilder Research, February, 2007

30 SROI of a representative mentoring program: total return Benefits and costs (per student) Total benefits $ 9,688 Total resource cost $ 3,562 Benefit/cost ratio $ 2.72 Source: Analyzing the Social Return on Investment in Youth Mentoring Programs, Wilder Research, February, 2007

31 SROI of a mentoring program: total return (excluding mentor satisfaction) Benefits and costs (per student) Total benefits (excl. mentor effects)$ 7,426 Total resource cost$ 3,562 Benefit/cost ratio $ 2.08 Source: Analyzing the Social Return on Investment in Youth Mentoring Programs, Wilder Research, February, 2007

32 Mentoring SROI Summary Our representative program returns benefits of $2.72 for every dollar of resources used. Returns $2.08 for every dollar of cost if the value of mentors’ time is excluded from the estimated benefits. Source: Analyzing the Social Return on Investment in Youth Mentoring Programs, Wilder Research, February, 2007

33 Paul Anton Chief Economist for Wilder Research

34 Illustrative Example: A comprehensive intervention program An extensive program of mentoring and other programmatic help Half of participants are referred for truancy; half are diverted from court for property crimes Teaching and reinforcement of healthy behaviors; reduction in risky, counterproductive behavior Cost per participant: $2,000 Source: Analyzing the Social Return on Investment in Youth Intervention Programs, Wilder Research, February, 2007

35 Reduced initial court costs $675 Reduced juvenile crime 36 Reduction cost of treatment 402 Improved high school graduation 7,310 Reduced school expenses $300 Enhanced school achievement 1,064 Total benefits (per student) $9,786 Cost of program (per student) $2,000 Benefit-cost ratio $ 4.89 Source: Analyzing the Social Return on Investment in Youth Intervention Programs, Wilder Research, February, 2007 SROI of a comprehensive intervention program: total return

36 SROI of a comprehensive intervention program: return to State of Minnesota Reduced initial court costs $ 675 Reduced juvenile crime 36 Reduction cost of treatment 402 Improved high school graduation (lifetime earnings) 7,310 Reduced school expenses 300 Enhanced school achievement 1,064 Total benefits (per student) $ 9,786 State share of cost of program (per student) $ 667 Note: total benefits/state costs $14.68 Source: Analyzing the Social Return on Investment in Youth Intervention Program, Wilder Research, February, 2007

37 SROI of a comprehensive intervention program: public return Reduced initial court costs $ 675 Reduced juvenile crime 36 Reduction cost of treatment 402 Reduced school expenses 300 Increased future taxes 2,368 Total benefits (per student) $ 3,105 State share of cost of program (per student) $ 667 Note: public benefits/state costs $ 4.66 Source: Analyzing the Social Return on Investment in Youth Intervention Programs, Wilder Research, February, 2007

38 Youth Intervention SROI Summary An effective comprehensive program costing around $2,000 per participant returns benefits of $4.89 for every dollar of cost Moreover, the program returns $14.68 for every State dollar invested, assuming a 2 to 1 match of other funding Source: Analyzing the Social Return on Investment in Youth Intervention Programs, Wilder Research, February, 2007

39 Short-term data collection Intake and exit data questionnaire related to outcomes Criminal justice data Survey of participants after graduation for program (for example, one year later) undertaken by individual programs

40 Long-term data collection Fund and conduct a long-term longitudinal study: Across a number of programs (mentoring and intervention) Identify participants and a comparable control group Track and survey both groups for a number of years (perhaps 10 years) with regard to outcomes

41 Our Moderator Dale A. Blyth Associate Dean of Extension Division of the University of Minnesota


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