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Industrial Revolution By TJ Roberts & Colin Drotar.

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Presentation on theme: "Industrial Revolution By TJ Roberts & Colin Drotar."— Presentation transcript:

1 Industrial Revolution By TJ Roberts & Colin Drotar

2 Facts About Industrial Revolution The Industrial Revolution was a rapid period of growth. Manufacturing methods did not produce enough goods to meet everyone's needs. It was first formulated by British Historian Arnold Toynbee. America went from working in homes and farms to water power, then to steam power The first big breakthrough was from water power and it was textiles. Also, agricultures and roads improved and populations grew.

3 Industrial Revolution Pictures

4 Works Cited Martello, Robert. "Industrial Revolution." Encyclopedia of Science, Technology, and Ethics. Ed. Carl Mitcham. Vol. 2. Detroit: Macmillan Reference USA, Gale U.S. History In Context. Web. 23 Apr. 2012

5 Labor Unions For Garment and Textile Workers

6 How it started Sara G Bagley, founded Lowel Female Labor Reform Association in Sara Bags was the first women to hold a high ranking in America labor movement. The associations had two main goals to influence and investigation of working conditions by Mass. State legislature and to obtain a ten hour working day. This was all for garment and textile workers. Union supported the ten hour working campaign.

7 Working Conditions Men and women often worked 12/14 hours per day 6 days a week. working conditions were know to be terrible and were dangerous. Mill workers got very little pay for what they did.

8 Successes President Martin Van Buren had granted a ten hour workday in New Hampshire, Ohio Pennsylvania passed ten hour workday laws. For factory workers in other states long hours remained common. Union supporters continued to fight for work reforms such as, an end to child labor in the factories in the 1800s.

9 Eli Whitney & Interchangeable Parts Erik Irvin & Troy Pearlman

10 Eli Whitney In 1798 addressed some tool problems Gave officials a proposal for mass-production of guns by using water powered machinery Made water powered machines Also came up with the idea of interchangeable parts

11 Interchangeable Parts Parts of a machine that are identical Using these interchangeable parts made machines easier to repair and replace broken parts Whitney promised to build 10,000 muskets in 2 years with the machines He got money to build his own factory in 1801

12 Influence Whitney proved the British technology could be improved Mass-production became the efficient production of large numbers of identical goods

13 Steamboats By: Wesley Olsen, and Taylor Goldberg

14 The Beginning In 1803 Robert Fulton tested the first steamboat in France, several years later he tested the first full sized steamboat. It was called the Clermont. The steamboat could move upriver easily and did not rely on wind power which meant they could carried more goods and people with additional efficiency They burned coal to fuel the engine.

15 improvements Henry shreve created a steamboat with an engine on the upper deck allowing the boat to draw in less water and navigate easier and safer In 1824 the court reinforced the federal governments authority to regulate the river/water control over states ending monopolies

16 The Future The steam boat made a big step for us InTechnology and economy which keeps us moving forward. Steamboats has allowed us to be able to make improvements and better means of transportations

17 Project By: Tyler Kaplan, Shawn Scaffa "Cotton Gin." U*X*L Encyclopedia of U.S. History. Sonia Benson, Daniel E. Brannen, Jr., and Rebecca Valentine. Ed. Lawrence W. Baker and Sarah Hermsen. Vol. 2. Detroit: UXL, Gale U.S. History In Context. Web. 23 Apr Work Cited

18  Eli Whitney: inventor of Cotton Gin  Revolutionized cotton production  Increased speed of production  Powered by Water Mills  Wanted to keep secret

19  Extracted Seeds  Processed Cotton into string  Produced more cotton than 20 slaves  Reduced Jobs

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21 ProsCons Cleans 50 lbs of cotton per dayUses Water Mill Power Can work all day without stoppingReduces Jobs Collects seeds from cotton automatically Prolonged Slavery Comprised 2/3 of all American exports Cotton Gin needs high maintenance without Water Mill

22 Who was the inventor of the cotton gin? A. Eli Whitney Eli Whitney B. Mike Wisousky Mike Wisousky C. Brian Choi Brian Choi D. God Zilla God Zilla

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24  I wish he made the cotton gin too.

25  THANKS FOR PLAYING!

26 Cotton Gin By: Kristin Kroh and Jackie Salantri

27 The Cotton Gin was invented by Eli Whitney in The Cotton Gin is a machine that removes seeds from short staple cotton. It use’s a hand crank cylinder with wired teeth, that separates the seeds and cotton fibers. Person = 1 pound/day Cotton Gin= 50 pound/day

28 Eli Whitney was not the first person to invent the cotton gin machine. The downside to the cotton gin was the effect it had on slavery. The more the cotton gins the more demand of slaves and workers. Another downside, was people began to copy his idea of the cotton gin, selling it around the world.

29 -1836 cotton was 2/3 of all American exports.

30 Works Cited " Cotton Gin." U*X*L Encyclopedia of U.S. History. Sonia Benson, Daniel E. Brannen, Jr., and Rebecca Valentine. Ed. Lawrence W. Baker and Sarah Hermsen. Vol. 2. Detroit: UXL, Gale U.S. History In Context. Web. 23 Apr

31 By Dr. Seuss (AKA Aftyn Anders n and Andréa Bauer)

32 Long ago in a land far away immigrants went to the Midwest to live out their days They went to get farms and to become laborers, many Americans did not like their new cultures Americans were protestants before Catholics came, native born Americans felt they weren’t the same

33 The Know-Nothing party, a political group, treated the immigrants like they were poop The Know Nothing politicians made difficult laws to prevent foreigner to be citizens to do what they want They had to live in here for 21 years to become citizens but the know-nothings fell apart due to slavery disagreements

34 By Dr. Seuss (AKA Aftyn Anders n and Andréa Bauer) This has been written in poetry form ANTI IMMIGRATION MOVEMENTS

35 Long ago in a land far away, immigrants went to the Midwest to live out their days They went to get farms and to become laborers, many Americans did not like their new cultures Americans were protestants before Catholics came, native born Americans felt they weren’t the same

36 The Know-Nothing party, a political group, treated the immigrants like they were poop The Know Nothing politicians made difficult laws to prevent foreigner to be citizens to do what they want They had to live in here for 21 years to become citizens but the know-nothings fell apart due to slavery disagreements

37 WE USED THIS!!!! dow?displayGroupName=Reference&disableHighlighting=false&prodId=UHIC&a ction=e&windowstate=normal&catId=&documentId=GALE%7CCX & mode=view

38 TEMPERANCE ACT Jenny Salvatore Kelly Viola

39 TEMPERANCE ACT  The temperance movement was marked by an undercurrent of ethnic and religious hostility.  Some of the first advocates were people of Anglo- Saxon heritage who associated alcohol with the growing number of Catholic immigrants from Ireland and the European continent.  Supposedly, the Catholics were loud and boisterous as a result of too much drinking.  According to these activists, the consumption of alcohol was responsible for many personal and societal problems, including unemployment, absenteeism in the workplace, and physical violence.

40 TEMPERANCE ACT  Congress enacted the Lever Act of 1917 (40 Stat. 276) to outlaw the use of grain in the manufacture of alcoholic beverages, and many state and local governments passed laws prohibiting the distribution and consumption of alcohol.  The Temperance Movement began in the Nineteenth Century.  It had an unprecedented agreement to reform the agitation.  They accepted the consumption of alcoholic beverages. It was an attack of the ignited popular enthusiasm.  This all took place in the United Sates.

41 WOMEN'S GROUPS  Groups such as the Women's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) and the Anti-Saloon League were at the forefront of the onslaught on alcohol.  Members of these groups spoke publicly in favor of Prohibition and lobbied elected officials for laws banning the consumption of alcohol.  Some of the more active members disrupted business at saloons and liquor stores

42 WORKS CITED  "Temperance Movement." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. Ed. Shirelle Phelps and Jeffrey Lehman. 2nd ed. Vol. 9. Detroit: Gale, Gale U.S. History In Context. Web. 23 Apr  “Temperance Movement.” Encyclopedia of the United States in the Nineteenth Century. Ed. Paul Finkelman. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, Gale U.S. History in Context. Web. 20. Apr. 2012

43 PRISON REFORM BY: KYLE SEDIA AND JIMMY RAGNOLI Dorothea Dix Prisoner reform

44 DOROTHEA DIX Dorothea dix helped the mentally ill who we keep in prisons. The mentally ill were treated the same as the prisoners. When she found out that this was happing he talked to the state legislature. Then Massachusetts started to make facilities for the mentally ill so there were need where meet and there were living better. Children who did crimes were treated the same as adults. But soon they were put into housing units where they can get educated. Soon they tried to end pusiment all together and just use education to change there behavior

45 The Underground Railroad By: Dona Lisciotto Madeleine Whitmore North

46 Facts Underground railroad wasn’t even an underground railroad it was a network of people that agreed to help slaves Loosely organized groups begun to help slaves escape from South to North or Canada Traveled on foot, small boats, and covered wagons they were even shipped in boxes The escaped slaves were called packages of freight

47 Facts The slaves had no guideposts but the stars Rest spots during the day were called “stations”, they were barns,attics, or other places on property owned by abolitionists (station masters or someone who helped the slaves) Most famous and daring conductor of the Underground railroad was Harriet Tubman Harriet escaped slavery in 1849, she lead her whole family and 300 others out of slavery If you caught her you the reward would be $400,000

48 Pictures Map of Underground railroad routes Slaves who used the Underground Railroad Harriet Tubman was a "conductor" on the Underground Railroad. She made at least fifteen trips into the South to help runaway slaves travel north to find freedom.

49 Works Cited "Underground Railroad." U*X*L Encyclopedia of U.S. History. Sonia Benson, Daniel E. Brannen, Jr., and Rebecca Valentine. Ed. Lawrence W. Baker and Sarah Hermsen. Vol. 8. Detroit: UXL, Gale U.S. History In Context. Web. 20 Apr "Harriet Tubman was a conductor on the Underground Railroad. She made at least fifteen trips into..." American Social Reform Movements Reference Library. Ed. Carol Brennan, et al. Vol. 2: Almanac. Detroit: UXL, Gale U.S. History In Context. Web. 23 Apr "Slaves who used the Underground Railroad." U*X*L Multicultural: A Comprehensive Resource on African Americans, Hispanic Americans and Native North Americans. Detroit: U*X*L, Gale U.S. History In Context. Web. 23 Apr "Map of The Routes of the Underground Railroad." Gale Encyclopedia of U.S. Economic History. Ed. Thomas Carson and Mary Bonk. Detroit: Gale, Gale U.S. History In Context. Web. 23 Apr

50 SENECA FALLS CONVENTION By: Julia Littman and Gigi Pagano

51 BEFORE THE CONVENTION In the nineteenth century, women could not vote, hold office, sit on juries, and were barred to speak in public. Elizabeth Cady Stanton went to the World’s Anti-Slavery Convention in London and realized she wasn’t allowed to participate. Women had to sit behind a curtain.

52 HOW IT STARTED Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stanton started a society to advance the rights of women. The first public meeting about women rights was held in the United States.

53 DECLARATION OF SENTIMENTS Declaration of Sentiments, was detailed beliefs about social injustice toward women. The DOI was the basis for the language of DOS. They was 18 charges against men and 100 people signed the DOS.

54 UNCLE TOM’S CABIN By: Kyle Whatley and Sam Steele

55 WHAT WAS UNCLE TOM’S CABIN? Surprisingly it is not a cabin and happens to be a book. It was written by Harriet Beecher Stowe and published in The book spoke out against slavery and was geared towards educating the north about why slavery was wrong. In the book, a young African American man named Tom was taken from his wife and sold to a cruel man named Simon Legree in Louisiana. In a fit of anger, Simon has Tom beaten to death. This book sold 2 million copies and outraged the North Stowe’s book is still read today to learn about the harsh realities of slavery.

56 WHO WAS HARRIET BEECHER STOWE? Harriet was the daughter of the Connecticut minister, Lyman Beecher. She met some fugitive slaves after moving to Ohio at the age of 21. From them she learned how mistreated and harshly slaves are treated and was outraged by the Fugitive Slave Act. Because of her meeting with the slaves, she decided to right her book, Uncle Tom’s Cabin. When Stowe met with President Lincoln, a year into the Civil War, he remarked “So this is the little lady who brought on this big war”

57 WORK'S CITED Lesinski, Jeanne M. "Uncle Tom's Cabin." Gale Library of Daily Life: Slavery in America. Ed. Orville Vernon Burton. Vol. 2. Detroit: Gale, Gale U.S. History In Context. Web. 23 Apr. 2012

58 Written by Harriet Beecher Stowe. The book is about anti-slavery. Harriet Beecher Stow met fugitive slaves and learned about cruelties of slavery She wrote a book to educate Northerns about slavery. Daughter of a Connecticut Minister named Lyman Beecher Had seven children, which one of them died

59  Uncle Tom’s Cabin  Met with Abraham Lincoln.  Abraham Lincoln said “So this is the little woman that bought on this big war.”  More than 2 million copies sold  Was a best seller in the United States.  The book was also sold in Europe.  Main character was an African American named Tom  Tom was taken from his wife and was beaten to death by Simon Legree.  The book contributed to the cause of the civil war.  Many Southerners called it faulty.

60   Lesinski, Jeanne M. "Uncle Tom's Cabin." Gale Library of Daily Life: Slavery in America. Ed. Orville Vernon Burton. Vol. 2. Detroit: Gale, Gale U.S. History In Context. Web. 20 Apr  "Topsy from Uncle Tom's Cabin." The Civil War. Web. 23 Apr

61 Aftyn Anderson and Andrea Bauer ANTI IMMIGRATION MOVEMENTS

62 immigrants went to the Midwest to find work in America Many immigrants wanted to start farms and to become laborers because land was fairly easy to gain many Americans did not like their new cultures Americans were protestants before Catholic immigrants came to America native born Americans felt they weren’t equals

63 The Know-Nothing party was a political group that didn’t want immigrants to become citizens The Know Nothing politicians made difficult laws to prevent foreigner to become citizens. -One of the laws required immigrants live in America for 21 years to become citizens -the know-nothing party fell apart later due to slavery disagreements

64 WE USED THIS!!!! dow?displayGroupName=Reference&disableHighlighting=false&prodId=UHIC&a ction=e&windowstate=normal&catId=&documentId=GALE%7CCX & mode=view


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