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Gayle F. Born, M.Ed. Mary Jane Trotti, M.A.. Rationale Why Teach Social Skills? Social Skills deficits become a family issue. Everything in your child’s.

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Presentation on theme: "Gayle F. Born, M.Ed. Mary Jane Trotti, M.A.. Rationale Why Teach Social Skills? Social Skills deficits become a family issue. Everything in your child’s."— Presentation transcript:

1 Gayle F. Born, M.Ed. Mary Jane Trotti, M.A.

2 Rationale Why Teach Social Skills? Social Skills deficits become a family issue. Everything in your child’s day is social. You can’t accommodate for social deficits. The greatest predictor of future success for your child is your child’s social skills rather than IQ. Richard Lavoie, It’s So Much Work to be Your Friend: Helping the Child with Learning Disabilities Find Social Success. Touchstone/Simon &Schuster 2005 Copyright© 2011 M.J. Trotti and Gayle Born

3 The Impact of Social and Emotional Intelligence More likely to live happy and productive lives Can tolerate frustration better Fight less with others Less Self-Destructive Less Lonely- more engaged in relationships Healthier More focused and less impulsive Have higher academic achievement Diane Schilling, 50 Activities for Teaching Emotional Intelligence, Copyright© 2011 M.J. Trotti and Gayle Born

4 The Big 12 Neurological Disorders that Impact Social and Emotional Functioning ADHD Inattentive Type Hyperactive Type Combined Type OCD Obsessions Compulsions/rituals Copyright© 2011 M.J. Trotti and Gayle Born

5 Anxiety Disorders Generalized Anxiety Disorder Panic Disorder Social Phobia Separation Anxiety PTSD Learning Disorders: Reading Disorder Mathematics Disorder Disorder of Written Exp. LD-NOS Copyright© 2011 M.J. Trotti and Gayle Born

6 Mood Disorders Depression Dysthymia Bipolar Tourette’s Syndrome Motor Tics Vocal Tics Copyright© 2011 M.J. Trotti and Gayle Born

7 Communication Disorders Receptive Language Disorder Expressive Language Disorder Receptive/Expressive Language Disorder Sensory Processing Disorder Sensory Seeker Sensory Defensiveness Copyright© 2011 M.J. Trotti and Gayle Born

8 Processing Disorders Slow Cognitive Tempo Central Auditory Processing Disorder Visual Processing Disorder Pervasive Developmental Disorders Asperger’s Syndrome PDD-NOS Autism Copyright© 2011 M.J. Trotti and Gayle Born

9 Executive Dysfunction Deficits in: Planning Organization Self-monitoring, Pacing Initiating Sequencing Prioritizing, Time management Non-Verbal Learning Disability Deficits in: Visual-spatial skills Motor skills Social skills Math computation Copyright© 2011 M.J. Trotti and Gayle Born

10 What tools should we use? Copyright© 2011 M.J. Trotti and Gayle Born

11 Skills & Strategies Problem Solving/Decision Making Managing Stress Personal Responsibility Self-Concept Empathy Communications Group Dynamics Conflict Resolution Self-awareness Managing Feelings Copyright© 2011 M.J. Trotti and Gayle Born

12 Superflex and the Unthinkables Copyright© 2011 M.J. Trotti and Gayle Born Video Presentations Chess GameNew Dress Field TripFamily VacationJoke Cards

13 Be an Active Listener!  A good Listener: Faces the speaker Looks into the speakers eyes. Is relaxed, but attentive Keeps an open mind Listens to the words and tries to picture what the speaker is saying Doesn’t interrupt or fidget Waits for the sender to pause to ask clarifying questions. Tries to feel what the sender is feeling Nods and says “uh huh,” or summarizes to let the speaker know he/she is listening Copyright© 2011 M.J. Trotti and Gayle Born

14 The Anger Thermometer In some ways anger is like a thermometer. It has degrees, from cool to very hot. The higher you go on the Anger Thermometer, the angrier you are! Try to cool off and bring yourself down the Anger Thermometer. Enraged Furious Angry Irritated Annoyed 1997 Educators for Social Responsibility

15 Engine Control Physical Strategies Release Strategies Cognitive Strategies Relaxation Strategies Graceful Exit Clock Watch Copyright© 2011 M.J. Trotti and Gayle Born

16 Strategies to Aid Calming And Avoid Escalation of Problems Provide a cue Use a signal Divert the child’s attention, if possible Redirect to a different location or activity Use relaxation techniques Use rewards Remind student about consequences Provide the student time to regroup Design a calming area as a “take-a-break” or “cool down” spot Copyright© 2003 by Sandra F. Rief

17 C.A.P.S. C – Stands for cool off. During this step you should leave the room, go get water, take a walk, exercise, or to the restroom – until you feel calm and in control. A – Stands for agree to talk about it. You can’t solve a conflict unless you can get the other person to agree to talk. In this step you ask the person to talk about it. (If the person refuses to talk you cannot proceed) P – Stands for point of view. In this step each of you tells your side of the disagreement using an “I” statement. “I” statements follow format: When you _____, I feel _____ and I would like for you to _____. An example would be: When you keep kicking my chair, I can’t concentrate and I would like you to keep your feet under your chair. S – Stands for solve it. In this step each of you commit to something you are willing to do to solve the problem. Copyright© 2003 by Sandra F. Rief

18 A Common Language Brings Us Together!!!! Copyright© 2011 M.J. Trotti and Gayle Born

19 The Language of Group  Very important to use a common language Check-in Greeting Farewell Connecting with others (F.E.V.E.R) Conflict Resolution (A.A.A) Engine Control “I” Statements Personal Space Attractive Behaviors Pssst Active Listening Superflex and the Unthinkables Copyright© 2011 M.J. Trotti and Gayle Born


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