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It’s All About “Style” …and perception, and appearances, and stereotypes, and influence, and behavior, and some other stuff…

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Presentation on theme: "It’s All About “Style” …and perception, and appearances, and stereotypes, and influence, and behavior, and some other stuff…"— Presentation transcript:

1 It’s All About “Style” …and perception, and appearances, and stereotypes, and influence, and behavior, and some other stuff…

2 Based on looks… Does these folks convey an attitude of success? Is their version of success something you aspire to?

3 How credible are these folks? Why would there be a difference? Based on appearances…

4 Would you trust these people Would you follow their lead? Based on looks…

5 How apt are you to be persuaded by this person? Have you already been? Why? Based on what you can see…

6 Based on appearances… What do you assume about these people?

7 To Be Clear… Whether “right” or “wrong”, bias exists. People stereotype. People assume stuff based on what they observe. UN 100 students very likely make assumptions about you--stereotyping and profiling YOU based on little more than what they observe for two hours each week. – Think about what they think they know about you. – Think about what you think you know about them. – This applies to your co-instructors, too. WAH!

8 Furthermore… Folks’ perceptions of you are likely not isolated from their behavior toward you (or the class). For instance, if you perceive someone to be dangerous based on their homely appearance, you will likely avoid that person…regardless of whether or not your assumptions are correct. Think about the “homeless man” on the previous slide. “Stereotype” is closely related to “Archetype” – If only in small ways, the stereotypical “corporate” businessman on the previous slide is also the archetypal, or “model” or “standard” of what many think a “corporate” businessman looks like. – Bieber could be considered the archetypal pop star, and that very well may be because of our own perceptions of what a pop star is or does…our stereotyping about pop stars…likely based on how we’ve seen other pop stars act on stage, television, in magazines, etc. We will examine the archetypal (perhaps stereotypical) Teaching Assistant…

9 5 Peer Leader Archetypes Jean M. Henscheid from the University of South Carolina categorized “peer leaders” in to five archetypes. Think in terms of what you are…NOT want you want to be: – The Critical and Supportive Other – The Crisis Counselor – Ebeneezer – The Cool One – The Disorienteer

10 The Critical and Supportive Other This peer leader understands their role as an educator first. They organize or suggest thoughtful, engaging, and challenging activities to facilitate learning and see the students’ intellectual and social success at the institution as their primary responsibility. They are careful to put learning first, friendship second, but know that the best learning occurs in a secure environment where risk-taking is encouraged. They are mature, confident, organized, flexible, and collaborative.

11 The Crisis Counselor This peer leader hones in on the often predominant emotional needs of first-year students to the exclusion of intellectual transition issues. They may fail to appropriately refer students in emotional need to individuals certified to manage these issues and may even foment crises to maintain their status as the student’s personal adviser and confidant. They may not be confident in their abilities to facilitate intellectual growth so may compensate by overemphasizing emotional issues.

12 Ebeneezer This peer leader relishes their authority role over near- peers and exhibit unnecessarily authoritarian of gruff behaviors. They may interpret their role as that of disciplinarian and seek opportunities to inappropriately punish student behavior. They may wish to highlight their institution-savvy or intellectual acumen by pointing out the new students’ lack of knowledge. A less surly variation of Ebeneezer is Charlie Brown’s teacher who has experienced school as a series of lectures, assignments, and quizzes and chooses to replicate their experience for the students in class.

13 The Cool One This peer leader works to build friendships with the students by “dissing” the norms and expectations of the institution. At their worst, this peer leader may attempt to “buy” the students’ friendship by extending invitations to inappropriate social activities, laughing off missed assignments, and focusing the students’ attention on social issues. A more benign version of The Cool One is the Friend Seeker, who may succumb to peer pressure from the students to lower academic standards of the class in order to gain the students’ affection.

14 The Disorienteer This peer leader may have the best intentions of the students at heart but has not mastered the art of organizing their responsibilities, managing their time, or saying no to too many obligations. They may arrive late to class or other appointments, fail to complete tasks, or forget important activities. They may respond by being self-deprecating and offering continuing promises to change or they may become defensive and shift blame.

15 Choose and go to your corner! The Critical and Supportive Other? – This peer leader understands their role as an educator first. They organize or suggest thoughtful, engaging, and challenging activities to facilitate learning and see the students’ intellectual and social success at the institution as their primary responsibility. They are careful to put learning first, friendship second, but know that the best learning occurs in a secure environment where risk-taking is encouraged. They are mature, confident, organized, flexible, and collaborative. The Crisis Counselor? – This peer leader hones in on the often predominant emotional needs of first-year students to the exclusion of intellectual transition issues. They may fail to appropriately refer students in emotional need to individuals certified to manage these issues and may even foment crises to maintain their status as the student’s personal adviser and confidant. They may not be confident in their abilities to facilitate intellectual growth so may compensate by overemphasizing emotional issues. Ebeneezer? – This peer leader relishes their authority role over near-peers and exhibit unnecessarily authoritarian of gruff behaviors. They may interpret their role as that of disciplinarian and seek opportunities to inappropriately punish student behavior. They may wish to highlight their institution-savvy or intellectual acumen by pointing out the new students’ lack of knowledge. A less surly variation of Ebeneezer is Charlie Brown’s teacher who has experienced school as a series of lectures, assignments, and quizzes and chooses to replicate their experience for the students in class. The Cool One? – This peer leader works to build friendships with the students by “dissing” the norms and expectations of the institution. At their worst, this peer leader may attempt to “buy” the students’ friendship by extending invitations to inappropriate social activities, laughing off missed assignments, and focusing the students’ attention on social issues. A more benign version of The Cool One is the Friend Seeker, who may succumb to peer pressure from the students to lower academic standards of the class in order to gain the students’ affection. The Disorienteer? – This peer leader may have the best intentions of the students at heart but has not mastered the art of organizing their responsibilities, managing their time, or saying no to too many obligations. They may arrive late to class or other appointments, fail to complete tasks, or forget important activities. They may respond by being self-deprecating and offering continuing promises to change or they may become defensive and shift blame. Which ONE do you identify most with?

16 In Your Groups… Characterize how your UN 100 students “see” your group’s archetype. In other words, how does an “Ebeneezer” TA appear to their UN 100 students. DRAW IT!

17 Homework… Send your responses to Due by FRIDAY, October 11 th, 5:00pm. Address each of the following (500 words): – Which archetype did you identify with? – In what ways do students’ perceptions of you influence your credibility as a TA? – What elements of your chosen archetype help you to engage students positively? – How do you think your archetype directly relates to your personality profile results?


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