Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Contents Click the link below to go directly to the slides for that chapter. Chapter 1 ■ Your Personal Strengths Chapter 2 ■ The Roles You Play Chapter.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Contents Click the link below to go directly to the slides for that chapter. Chapter 1 ■ Your Personal Strengths Chapter 2 ■ The Roles You Play Chapter."— Presentation transcript:

1

2 Contents Click the link below to go directly to the slides for that chapter. Chapter 1 ■ Your Personal Strengths Chapter 2 ■ The Roles You Play Chapter 3 ■ Why We Work Chapter 4 ■ Exploring the Career Clusters Chapter 5 ■ Think Like an Entrepreneur Chapter 6 ■ Skills for Success Chapter 7 ■ Academic Planning Chapter 8 ■ Communicating with Others Chapter 9 ■ Building Relationships Chapter 10 ■ Basic Math Skills Chapter 11 ■ Technology and Your Career Chapter 12 ■ Career Planning Chapter 13 ■ Managing a Job Search Chapter 14 ■ Getting Started in Your Career Chapter 15 ■ Being Productive in Your Career Chapter 16 ■ Living a Healthy and Balanced Life Chapter 17 ■ Starting Your Own Business Chapter 18 ■ Planning Your Own Business Chapter 19 ■ Managing Your Business Chapter 20 ■ Personal Money Management Chapter 21 ■ Personal Financial Planning Chapter 22 ■ Basic Economics Chapter 23 ■ Basic Business Financial Management Chapter 24 ■ Financial Calculations for Business

3 Creating Job Search Materials  Your resume is the most important job search document. It is a written summary of your work-related skills, experience, and education.  A cover letter is sent along with your resume. It introduces you to a potential employer and highlights the qualities that make you suitable for the position.  A list of references includes the names and contact information of people who know you and your qualifications, and who are willing to speak about you to potential employers. 3 Employers often consider tens or even hundreds of candidates for every job opening. ChapterManaging a Job Search 13

4 Preparing Your Job Search Materials  A cover letter should be short and to the point. Customize it to the job opening for which you are applying.  A reference is someone who knows you well and is willing to speak to employers about your qualifications.  Create a reference list to include in your career portfolio, and have it available for employers when they ask.  Select at least three people, and ask them for permission to use them as a reference.  Everyone looking for work should keep a career portfolio for storing documents such as a resume, cover letter, personal data sheet, and list of references. 4 ChapterManaging a Job Search 13

5 Your Job Search Portfolio  A portfolio that includes samples of your current work is an important part of your job search materials if you are looking for a position in a creative career.  Keep your job search materials organized in a folder or binder will help you follow up every possibility:  Keep a to-do list of tasks you want to accomplish each day, such as people you want to contact, resumes you have to send out, and thank-you notes to write.  Contact some people in your network every day.  Follow up on all leads.  Set up folders for storing documents that relate to your job search. 5 ChapterManaging a Job Search 13

6 Preparing a Resume  You want your resume to describe you in a way that makes the employer want to meet you.  There are many ways to organize or format a resume. Choose a format that highlights your experience and skills so they stand out to someone glancing at it quickly.  Sometimes you will mail your resume in an envelope with a cover letter. Other times you will send it electronically by e- mail. 6 A resume is a document that provides a snapshot image of your qualifications. It summarizes you, your skills, and your abilities. It is a statement of who you are, what you have done in your life, and what you hope to do next. Your resume may be the first communication between you and a potential employer. ChapterManaging a Job Search 13

7 Organizing Your Resume  A typical resume has four main sections:  Contact information  Objective  Education  Work experience  You may also include a Skills section for listing jobs skills and a Personal Information section that lists extracurricular activities, awards, and honors.  Action words are verbs that describe your actions in a way that makes them stand out to the reader. When you use action words to describe your responsibilities and skills in a cover letter or on your resume, it will bring your actions to life. 7 ChapterManaging a Job Search 13

8 Applying for a Job  Applying means that you present yourself as a candidate for the position.  Applying usually starts with sending in your resume and a cover letter.  When you apply for a job, your short-term goal is to get invited for an interview.  A job application is a standard form you fill out when you apply for a job. You might fill it out in person or online.  A personal information card holds the information you might need to fill out a job application accurately. You may want to store the information in your cell phone or handheld device. 8 ChapterManaging a Job Search 13

9 Interviewing for a Job  A job interview is like a test—if you pass, you are offered the job.  Use these four steps to prepare for a job interview: 1.Research the company or organization where you are going for the interview. 2.Make a list of questions an interviewer might ask you 3.Prepare answers to the questions and be specific. 4.Make a list of five to ten questions you can ask the interviewer.  Practice for the interview by rehearsing your behavior and answers to questions helps give you confidence. 9 A job interview is a formal meeting between a job seeker and a potential employer. ChapterManaging a Job Search 13

10 Preparing for a Job Interview  To best use the interview time to get a job offer:  Dress neatly and professionally.  Be clean.  Arrive ten minutes early.  Be polite and respectful to everyone you meet.  Shake hands with your interviewer when you arrive, and before you leave.  Listen carefully, using positive body language.  Use proper English when you speak; no slang.  Avoid chewing gum, cell phone calls, and texting.  At the end of the interview, shake hands again, and thank the interviewer. 10 ChapterManaging a Job Search 13

11 After the Interview  Telephone interviews are used to screen, or make a first decision about, potential employees.  After the interview, write a thank-you note to the interviewer.  Follow up the interview by a call or an .  Being called back for a second interview means you passed the first test.  If you are offered the job, make sure you have all the information you need to make the best decision. Use the decision-making process to decide whether to accept the position or not.  If you do not get a job offer, it may be helpful if the interviewer can explain why you were not selected. 11 ChapterManaging a Job Search 13

12 Evaluating a Job Offer  The most important consideration when evaluating a job offer is usually the monetary compensation.  Base pay is the hourly wage or annual salary that you earn.  A commission is a payment based on a percentage of sales.  A bonus is a lump sum paid in addition to base pay.  Make a budget to identify expenses to know how much income you need.  Benefits are things other than wages that have value. Most companies offer some benefits such as health insurance, life insurance, vacation time, and so on. 12 Employment needs range from compensation, or wages and benefits, to recognition; from training to accommodations for disabilities. ChapterManaging a Job Search 13

13 Insurance and Accommodations  Insurance is an investment that protects you financially against everyday risks.  You may be able to negotiate with the employer if the salary and benefit offer is lower than you expected.  When you negotiate, always be polite and positive.  An accommodation makes it possible for a disabled employee to perform his or her job responsibilities in a safe and accessible work environment.  By law, employers who are aware of an employee’s disability must make accommodations, if the accommodations do not impose an extreme hardship on the business. 13 ChapterManaging a Job Search 13

14 Chapter Review  A resume is a written summary of your work-related skills, experience, and education.  A cover letter introduces you to a potential employer and highlights the qualities that make you suitable for the position.  A reference is someone who knows you well and is willing to speak to employers about your qualifications.  A career portfolio stores documents such as a resume, cover letter, personal data sheet, and list of references.  A job application is a standard form you fill out when you apply for a job. 14 ChapterManaging a Job Search 13

15 Chapter Review (continued)  A job interview is a formal meeting between a job seeker and a potential employer.  After the interview, write a thank-you note to the interviewer.  Compensation is the combination of wages and benefits you receive as part of the job offer.  Benefits are things other than wages that have value.  Insurance is an investment that protects you financially against everyday risks.  An accommodation makes it possible for a disabled employee to perform his or her job responsibilities in a safe and accessible work environment. 15 ChapterManaging a Job Search 13


Download ppt "Contents Click the link below to go directly to the slides for that chapter. Chapter 1 ■ Your Personal Strengths Chapter 2 ■ The Roles You Play Chapter."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google