Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Chapter 2 Communicating in Groups and Teams Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 4e Copyright © 2003.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Chapter 2 Communicating in Groups and Teams Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 4e Copyright © 2003."— Presentation transcript:

1 Chapter 2 Communicating in Groups and Teams Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 4e Copyright © 2003

2 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 4e Ch. 2, Slide 2 Why form groups and teams? Better decisions Faster response Increased productivity Greater “buy-in” Less resistance to change Improved employee morale Reduced risks

3 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 4e Ch. 2, Slide 3 Four Phases of Team Development

4 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 4e Ch. 2, Slide 4 Four Phases of Team Development Forming

5 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 4e Ch. 2, Slide 5 Four Phases of Team Development Forming

6 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 4e Ch. 2, Slide 6 Four Phases of Team Development Forming Storming

7 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 4e Ch. 2, Slide 7 Four Phases of Team Development Forming Storming

8 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 4e Ch. 2, Slide 8 Four Phases of Team Development Forming Storming Norming

9 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 4e Ch. 2, Slide 9 Four Phases of Team Development Forming Storming Norming

10 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 4e Ch. 2, Slide 10 Four Phases of Team Development Forming Storming Norming Performing

11 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 4e Ch. 2, Slide 11 Four Phases of Team Development Forming Storming Norming Performing

12 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 4e Ch. 2, Slide 12 Characteristics of Successful Teams Small size, diverse makeup Agreement on purpose Agreement on procedures Ability to deal with conflict Use of good communication techniques Ability to collaborate rather than compete Shared leadership

13 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 4e Ch. 2, Slide 13 Roles Played by Team Members Task Roles Initiator Information seeker/giver Opinion seeker/giver Direction giver Summarizer Energizer

14 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 4e Ch. 2, Slide 14 Gatekeeper Reality tester What kinds of statements might be made by these role players? Roles Played by Team Members

15 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 4e Ch. 2, Slide 15 Relationship Roles Participation encourager Harmonizer/tension reliever Evaluator of emotional climate Praise giver Empathic listener What kinds of statements might be made by these role players? Roles Played by Team Members

16 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 4e Ch. 2, Slide 16 Dysfunctional Roles Blocker Attacker Recognition-seeker Joker Withdrawer What kinds of statements might be made by these role players? Roles Played by Team Members

17 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 4e Ch. 2, Slide 17 Skills for Team Leaders Task Relationships Goal setting Agenda making Clarifying Summarizing Verbalizing consensus Establishing work patterns Following procedures

18 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 4e Ch. 2, Slide 18 Skills for Team Leaders Interpersonal Relationships Regulating participation Maintaining positive climate Maintaining mutual respect Instigating group self-analysis Resolving conflict Instigating conflict Based on Cragan and Wright, Communication in Small Groups, 5e, Wadsworth, 1999.

19 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 4e Ch. 2, Slide 19 Methods for Reaching Group Decisions Majority Consensus Minority Averaging Authority rule with discussion What are the advantages and disadvantages of each method?

20 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 4e Ch. 2, Slide 20 Strategies for Effective Conflict Resolution 1. When attacked, negotiate rather than escalate. Separate the issue from the person. Act as if the other side does not want to harm you personally. 2. Use the third person. Avoid “you” and “I” statements. Not: You never come prepared, and I’m sick of it. But: It’s hard to discuss this without all the facts.

21 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 4e Ch. 2, Slide 21 Strategies for Effective Conflict Resolution 3. Work to maintain a calm tone of voice. Stay away from provocative verbal emphasis. Not: It’s HARD to discuss this without ALL the facts. 4. Practice compassionate, helpful feedback. Focus on behaviors, not attitudes. Talk about things that can be changed. Not: Stop being aggressive! But: It would be easier to respond if you lowered your voice.

22 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 4e Ch. 2, Slide 22 Strategies for Effective Conflict Resolution 5. Avoid sending threatening signals. Don’t engage in sustained eye contact. Keep hand gestures to a minimum. 6. Don’t use “First Strike” language. You always... or If you really... or Try to understand When provoked, try a listening check. Calmly and respectfully restate both sides of the argument. Take time to walk around the topic–and cool off.

23 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 4e Ch. 2, Slide 23 Strategies for Effective Conflict Resolution 8. Clear the air. If you’re on a team with someone who seems consistently irritated with you, ask for a private meeting. Solicit feedback; listen without interrupting and with an open mind. Request permission to respond with equal openness.

24 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 4e Ch. 2, Slide 24 Planning and Participating in Meetings Before the meeting Consider alternatives. Is a meeting necessary? Invite the right people. Include... those who have information. those who can make decisions. those who must implement decisions. Distribute an agenda.

25 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 4e Ch. 2, Slide 25 Planning and Participating in Meetings During the Meeting Start on time and introduce the agenda. Appoint a secretary and a recorder. Encourage balanced participation. Confront conflict frankly. Summarize points of consensus along the way.

26 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 4e Ch. 2, Slide 26 Planning and Participating in Meetings Ending the Meeting and Following Up Review meeting decisions. Distribute minutes of meeting. Remind people of action items.

27 Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 4e Ch. 2, Slide 27 End


Download ppt "Chapter 2 Communicating in Groups and Teams Mary Ellen Guffey, Business Communication: Process and Product, 4e Copyright © 2003."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google