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CLUB MEMBERSHIP OVERVIEW Membership numbers Coach & Team numbers  Recreational: 1100 (75%)  In-House: 825  Academy: 75  Travel: 200  Select: 300 (21%)

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Presentation on theme: "CLUB MEMBERSHIP OVERVIEW Membership numbers Coach & Team numbers  Recreational: 1100 (75%)  In-House: 825  Academy: 75  Travel: 200  Select: 300 (21%)"— Presentation transcript:

1 CLUB MEMBERSHIP OVERVIEW Membership numbers Coach & Team numbers  Recreational: 1100 (75%)  In-House: 825  Academy: 75  Travel: 200  Select: 300 (21%)  Classic: 240  State: 60  Adult Recreational: 60 (4%)  Membership gender breakout  55% Female  45% Male  Coaches  Recreational: 175  Academy: 10  Select: 35  Teams  Recreational: 85  In-House: 77  Travel: 8  Academy: 10  Select: 16  Classic: 12  State: 4

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3 CLUB MEMBERSHIP OVERVIEW Membership numbers Coach & Team numbers  Recreational: 1100 (75%)  In-House: 825  Academy: 75  Travel: 200  Select: 300 (21%)  Classic: 240  State: 60  Adult Recreational: 60 (4%)  Membership gender breakout  55% Female  45% Male  Coaches  Recreational: 175  Academy: 10  Select: 35  Teams  Recreational: 85  In-House: 77  Travel: 8  Academy: 10  Select: 16  Classic: 12  State: 4

4 WHERE DO WE FIT INTO THE SOCCER COMMUNITY?

5 INTERNATIONALLY  FIFA: Int’l Governing Body  CONCACAF: Governs North America, Central America and the Caribbean

6 NATIONALLY  US SOCCER: governing body for all soccer in the U.S.  US YOUTH SOCCER (USYS): our National youth affiliate  WI YOUTH SOCCER (WYSA): governing body under USYS  EAST CENTRAL SOCCER DISTRICT (EC): District under WYSA.  UNITED HURRICANES (UH)

7 WHO ARE WE?

8 UNITED HURRICANES SOCCER CLUB United Hurricanes Soccer Club was established in 2013 as a result of the merger of two forward thinking clubs; HS United (est. 1981) and the Howard Hurricanes (est. 1989). Together we will work tirelessly to change the face of soccer in the Green Bay area and provide the best possible opportunities for ALL of our players.

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10  Provide a player-centric club atmosphere for families where each player is given the opportunity to play soccer in a supportive and rewarding environment.  Emphasizing fun, enjoyment and skill learning at a level that fits his/her interest and ability.  While also creating a challenging environment for talented players who aspire to reach their full potential.

11 PROGRAM OFFERINGS PROGRAMAGESSEASONSTRYOUTS?COST TIME COMMITTMENT IN-HOUSE REC MAY-JULY / SEPT- OCT NO $43-53 $ /WK M-TH ENHANCED ACADEMY 7-10 SEPT-OCT / MAR- APR MAY-JUNE NO $ $ /WK M-TH/SA DEVELOPMENTAL SELECT AUG-OCT / JAN-APR APR-JUNE YES (EVALUATIONS) $ $115 uniform 3/WK M-TH EAST CENTRAL REC MAY-JULYNO $852/WK M-TH/SU CLASSIC SELECT14-18 AUG-OCT / JAN-APR APR-JUNE YES $ $115 uniform 3-4/WK M-TH /SA-SU ADULT REC18+ JUNE-JULYNO $851-2/WK SU/ M-TH TOPSOCCEROPEN TBDNO TBD

12 PLAYER PATHWAYS IN-HOUSE RECREATIONAL (GRASSROOTS) U4-U10 ENHANCED ACADEMY U8-U10 EAST CENTRAL RECREATIONAL LEAGUE U12-U19 DEVELOPMENTAL SELECT U11-U13 ENHANCED ACADEMY U8-U10 IN-HOUSE RECREATIONAL (GRASSROOTS) U4- U10 EAST CENTRAL RECREATIONAL LEAGUE U12-U19 DEVELOPMENTAL SELECT U11-U13 EAST CENTRAL RECREATIONAL U12-U19 CLASSIC SELECT U13-U19 EAST CENTRAL RECREATIONAL LEAGUE U12-U19 CLASSIC SELECT U13-U19 ADULT RECREATIONAL 18+ DEVELOPMENTAL SELECT U11-U13 CLASSIC SELECT U14-U19 EAST CENTRAL RECREATIONAL U14-U19 ADULT RECREATIONAL 18+

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15 LONG-TERM PLAYER DEVELOPMENT (LTPD)  A COMPREHENSIVE APPROACH  Player centered  Holistic  Developmentally appropriate curriculum

16 IN ORDER TO LEARN & DEVELOP, CHILDREN REQUIRE:  Relationships with responsive adults  Active, hands-on involvement  Meaningful experiences  Opportunities to construct their understanding of the world (a process supported by the three previous constructs)

17 BASIC PRINCIPLES OF DEVELOPMENTALLY APPROPRIATE:  All domains of child development (social, emotional, physical, cognitive) are important and interrelated.  Many aspects of child development follow a consistent documented progression, with later skills and proficiencies building upon the others already acquired.

18 BASIC PRINCIPLES OF DEVELOPMENTALLY APPROPRIATE:  Rates of development vary from child to child and even vary between domains of development within the individual child.  Development and learning takes place within the dynamic interaction of both biological maturation and personal experience.  Early experiences have profound effects, and there are optimal periods for certain types of learning and development.

19 BASIC PRINCIPLES OF DEVELOPMENTALLY APPROPRIATE:  Play is an important vehicle for developing self- regulation as well as social, language, and cognitive development.  Development and learning are advanced when children are challenged just above their competency and when they have many opportunities to practice new skills.

20 BASIC PRINCIPLES OF DEVELOPMENTALLY APPROPRIATE:  Children’s experiences shape their motivation and approach to learning (persistence, initiative, flexibility) and these dispositions in turn influence their learning and development.

21 THE DEVELOPMENT CURRICULUM

22  https://www.youtube.com/user/OSAVideoMaster https://www.youtube.com/user/OSAVideoMaster

23 Roadmap of learning objectives  Where are we going – How do we get there  The WHO, WHAT, WHERE, WHEN, WHY AND HOW

24 THE WHO

25 THE PLAYERS ALL DECISIONS ARE BASED ON ONE QUESTION… “IS THIS WHAT IS BEST FOR THE PLAYERS”

26 THE WHERE & THE WHEN

27  RIGHT HERE AND  RIGHT NOW  The time for questioning is done, the answer is clear, there is no need to wait.

28 THE WHY

29 LTPD OBJECTIVES  More individual time on the ball  More DECISION MAKING opportunities without the fear of failure  Acceptance of making MISTAKES  Embrace Individuality  Encourage CREATIVITY

30 LTPD OBJECTIVES Develop players who:  Are well-rounded, confident & SKILLED  Play with integrity, CREATIVITY & passion  LOVE the game  Play for a LIFETIME

31 THE WHAT

32 AGE SPECIFIC DETAILED PLAN (U4/U6/U8 etc. )  Based on Developmental Characteristics of the age group.  Season long plan  Followed by all teams within an age group  Focused on the individual  Players participate in all subjects

33 THE HOW

34 EDUCATION  BOARD  COACHES  MANAGERS  PARENTS  COMMUNITY

35 COACHES ARE THE TEACHERS  OUR COACHES MUST  Understand the characteristics of the age group  Create a positive environment for learning  Be enthusiastic and positive  Make sessions enjoyable and fun  Allow players to learn at their own pace  Allow players to play their game  Educate themselves about the game and LTPD

36 AGE SPECIFIC CURRICULA  Appropriate in these areas of development  PHYSICAL (psychomotor)  COGNITIVE (mental/psychological)  SOCIALLY (psychosocial)  ALL children develop at different rates at different times  LTPD allows players to learn at their own pace  Age appropriate lessons and player expectations  INCLUSIVE- no selecting out  Allows for differentiation/individualization

37 TOOL BOX OF COACHING APPROACHES DESIGNED TO ENHANCE THE INDIVIDUALS DEVELOPMENTAL EXPERIENCE SLANTY LINE THEORY GUIDED DISCOVERY SMALL SIDED GAMES

38 DIFFERENTIATION SLANTY LINE THEORY STRAIGHT-LINE APPROACH High-water / Low-water game- the rope starts on the ground and everyone jumps over it...Then two children raise the rope to a new level. As children are unable to jump over the rope they are ELIMINATED until only one person is left... The problem: It ELIMINATES those who need the activity the most

39 DIFFERENTIATION SLANTY LINE THEORY SLANTY LINE Mosston takes the same rope and SLANTS IT. Now…  Each child can participate at THEIR OWN ABILITY LEVEL  Each child is CHALLENGED Children will not continue activities in which they are continually eliminated or wait to take turns. Given opportunities, children seek out challenges and take risks.

40 HOW DO WE APPLY THE SLANTY LINE THEORY TO TRAINING?  Discreetly  This method is intended to increase player success  General application- full group  Can you beat your score?  Players are competing against themselves and their challenge is relative to their current level  Specific application- individuals  Address players individually in the flow of the activity to increase or decrease their challenge  Group application- divide group by ability on that skill  Address groups individually in the flow of the activity to increase or decrease their challenge

41 GUIDED DISCOVERY

42 WHAT IS IT?  Method that uses effective age appropriate questioning  Guided questions  Empowers players to discover “I hear and I forget, I see and I remember, I do and I understand’ - Confucius

43 WHY USE GUIDED DISCOVERY  It improves the learning process for the players- active learners  It gives the players the opportunity to practice problem solving-real time  It empowers players to make decisions and take risks “Asking the right questions takes as much skill as giving the right answers.” - Robert Half

44 EXAMPLES OF U6 & U8 QUESTIONS  What should you do to see where your teammates are?  What part of the foot do you use to make a short pass?  Where should you aim when shooting on goal? EXAMPLES OF U10 & U12 QUESTIONS  How can we get the ball down the field quickly?  What happens when you pass the ball behind your teammate? THERE ARE NO WRONG ANSWERS! MAY NEED TO REPHRASE THE QUESTION

45 POSITIVE COACHING RESPONSES...  Good idea! Can you show me?  Great....so how could we do it faster?  I like that answer...what other skill can we use to get the ball to our teammates?  Now you’re getting the idea!

46 EFFECTIVE QUESTIONING  Need to pre-plan questions  Gain the players attention  When is it appropriate to ask questions  Wait time for responses  Reinforcement  Prompting/Probing  Distributing questions

47 PITFALLS  Players sometimes answer without real thought, they just call out catchwords or phrases they have heard from the coach i.e. space, pressure  Rhetorical questions  Not giving players time to think and respond  Too many questions sequentially

48 SMALL-SIDED GAMES

49 WHAT ARE SMALL-SIDED GAMES? Games played on smaller fields with fewer than 11 players a side BENEFITS OF SMALL-SIDED GAMES  Skill development; more touches on the ball  Tactical development; more decision making opportunities  Fun and enjoyment; goal scoring chances increased  Game understanding; positional play is greatly expanded  Intuitive development; transitional play is increased and becomes automatic

50 STUDY CONDUCTED BY SPORTS UNIVERSITY OF COLOGNE SCOTLAND4v47v711v11 Touches per game Touches per player v1 situations Attempts on goal Goals scored26112 Ball out of play3 min3.5 min14 min SPAIN7v711v11 Effective play67%53% Touches per player 227 Attempts on goal268 MANCHESTER UTD4v48v8 Passes Dribbles v1 Situations Attempts on goal Goals scored600100

51 UH SMALL-SIDED GAMES  U4 play 3v3 (no goalkeeper)  U6 play 3v3 (no goalkeeper)  U8 play 4v4 (no goalkeeper)  U10 play 6v6 (5+ goalkeeper)  U12 play 8v8 (7+ goalkeeper)

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53 POSSESSION PHILOSOPHY  DEEMPHASIZING THE LONG BALL  Playing the ‘long ball’ is counterproductive to long-term individual, as well as collective, development  They will get scored on-they will lose possession-It’s ok!  We will not compromise for short term results  Learning to play the ball out from the back is essential for development  All teams must feel comfortable playing the ball from the back through the midfield and from there to the final quarter of the field

54 POSSESSION PHILOSOPHY OFFENSE-DEFENSE QUICK TRANSITION  When we have the ball  WE ARE ALL PLAYING OFFENSE  When they have the ball  WE ARE ALL PLAYING DEFENSE

55 UH FORMATIONS Per the US Soccer Curriculum Guidelines, UH teams will play in the following formations.  4-a-side = 2-2  6-a-side =  8-a-side =  11-a-side = 4-3-3/4-4-2

56 U8 U

57 GYM SESSION

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59 PURPOSE The purpose of this curriculum is to help standardize “best practice” soccer training throughout the club. This curriculum will serve as a vehicle to develop coaching consistency within age groups and a developmental progression across age groups. The curriculum can stand on its own to teach all coaches what is best for developing players. At the same time, coaches can utilize our coaching staff for constant consultation and/or clarification whenever needed. Please understand that every child varies in their development and these are strictly guidelines. Guidelines are meant to be flexible as all players of the same age are certainly not at the same developmental level. It is important we challenge all players at a level that befits their ability. The information in this document comes not only from State Directors of Coaching and State Developmental Coaches but also from the National Director of Coaching and other National Staff Coaches. The information is not solely based on observation and experience in soccer, but also on research and practice in psychology, child development, physiology, child education, and learning theory. We hope all coaches will use this curriculum to help insure our players are being provided the best soccer environment possible.

60 COACHES It is not important that you be a good soccer player to be a good soccer coach. It is important that you be able to connect with the children on their level. Our challenge as coaches of young players is to create game-like activities that aid the learning process and provide enjoyment for players. So much of what makes a coach successful at developing the young soccer players, in a FUN environment that makes the kids want to continue coming back, is the coach's ability to create age appropriate, fun training sessions. This coaching guide was created specifically to help our coaches do just that.

61 ROLE OF THE U4 & U6 COACH The role of the coach in the U4 & U6 age group is as facilitator, friendly helper, organizer, and motivator. The coach should be patient, enthusiastic, and imaginative. The coach should experiment with fun activities that include all players, if possible. The environment and the activities are more important than technical coaching is at this level.

62 LICENSING REQUIREMENTS The State Youth Module (Y1) is required. The National Youth License is recommended.

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64 THE U4 & U6 PLAYER The fascination for the ball, the desire to master it and the thrill of scoring goals provides the launching pad into a lifetime of soccer participation. The joy and pleasure of the game are best nurtured by encouraging freedom of expression and organizing children’s play in small groups.

65 MENTAL / PSYCHOLOGICAL (COGNITIVE)  Short attention span  Individually oriented…egocentric  Sensitive…Easily bruised psychologically  Love to use their imagination…pretend  Tend to only one task at a time  Can process small bits of information  Immature understanding of time and space relations

66 PHYSICAL (PSYCHOMOTOR)  Constantly in motion  No sense of pace (full speed ahead)  Easily fatigued with rapid recovery  Eye/hand and eye/foot coordination is primitive  Can balance on good foot  Catching skills are not developed  Love to run, jump, fall and roll  Boys and girls are quite similar psychologically and physically

67 SOCIALLY (PSYCHOSOCIAL)  Love to show off  Little or no real concern for team activities  Tend to parallel play…play next to but not with a friend or teammate  Influential people in their life -MOM & DAD  Like to mimic goofy actions

68 U4 & U6 WHAT TO TEACH PLAYERS GAME COMPONENTS

69 TECHNIQUES (SKILLS)  DRIBBLING  Keep the ball close  Dribble with all sides of both feet (inside, outside, sole)  Dribble out of trouble  Dribble past someone  Changing of speed and direction  Introduction to SHIELDING  “Don’t let them get your ball”  Introduction to SHOOTING  With both feet (with inside of foot and laces)  Stopping the ball  Players should spend equal time developing both feet this is very important!

70 PSYCHOLOGY (MENTAL AND SOCIAL)  Sharing  Fair play  Dealing with parental involvement (confusion)  “How to play”  Emotional management  Keep it fun and enjoyable! This will help foster a desire to play (intrinsic motivation)  Encourage imagination and creativity

71 PHYSICAL  Coordination and basic motor skills with and without the ball  Balance  Running  Jumping  Rolling  Hopping  Skipping

72 TACTICS (DECISIONS)  Where is the field  Moving in the correct direction  Dealing with the ball rolling away  Dealing with the ball rolling toward  Advanced U6 players could begin to be exposed to these simple tactical scenarios and understand how to both attack and defend these game contexts: 1 v 1 (attacking and defending)

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74 NO PURPOSEFUL PASSING  They can not/ will not pass the ball  Remember: me, my, mine  They are playing 1v5 games  Don’t tell or ask them to  Tell parents not to ask- this may take many reminders, keep on them as it is crucial to player development  ONLY USE UH BALLS DURING GAMES

75 NO SENSE OF POSITIONING  They will play hive/herd ball…  Let them!  They will not spread out, and if they do they wont stay that way, so don’t bother trying.  It’s more important to encourage the desire to get the ball  There are no positions at these ages

76 DIRECTIONAL CHALLENGES  They will run the wrong way  Let them!  They will score on the wrong goal  CHEER!

77 BY THE END OF THE SEASON  Players should be comfortable when the ball is at their feet  Players should be capable of  Running with the ball  Stopping a ball  Striking a ball  “Getting” the ball

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79 MAIN OBJECTIVES OF KINS 1. Emphasize the skill of DRIBBLING 2. Discourage the aimless booting of the ball 3. Promote DECISION-MAKING 4. Reduce dependence on the adults for problem solving 5. Keep the ball in play-CONTINUOUS PLAY

80 BENEFITS OF KINS  Improves the skill and enjoyment of all players, regardless of ability level  Raises the skill level in all programs  Ball in play almost 100% of the time vs. 45% under traditional rules  70% increase in the total number of touches per player in each game

81 IMPORTANCE OF DRIBBLING  Dribbling-foundation for other fundamental skills of soccer  Players need to learn to dribble within a variety of playing situations, such as:  Dribbling forward unopposed  Changing speed and direction  Shielding the ball from opponents  Dribbling past an opponent  Dribbling to get away from pressure

82 WHAT ABOUT PASSING?  PASSING  Implies INTENTION by a player to direct the ball accurately towards a teammate  Implies DECISION-MAKING  Do not confuse passing with kicking  Kicking means using the feet to propel the ball in a certain direction  You will not see passing in U4 & U6 games  It is not developmentally feasible for most U4-U8 players.

83 THE DRIBBLING / PASSING CORRELATION  The best dribblers are also the best passers  Both of these skills require:  Ability to shift body weight quickly from one foot to the other  Ability to balance on one foot while propelling the ball with the other foo t  Once a player becomes a good dribbler, he/she automatically starts to look up and survey the field in between touches  Which is necessary for passing

84 KINS PROGRAM ‘NEW BALL’ METHOD

85 NEW BALL METHOD  Keeps the flow of the game constant  Increase the number of ball touches by all the players  Eliminates restarts (throw-ins, corner kicks, goal kicks) and keeps the ball in play continuously  Restarts have no relevance or developmental benefits at the U4-U8 levels

86 IMPLEMENTING ‘NEW BALL’ METHOD  Coach controls the balls  If using two coaches, each coach should be in charge of half a field.  Each coach will have UH balls ready to be thrown, one at a time.  When a ball goes out of bounds, the coach yells “new ball!” and puts a new one into play on the ground

87 IMPLEMENTING ‘NEW BALL’ METHOD DISTRIBUTION  Always place the ball into the unoccupied space  Players will learn to move towards the ball  Try not to create a bounce with the ball as Players are not yet skilled enough to control a bouncing ball

88 IMPLEMENTING ‘NEW BALL’ METHOD SHY PLAYERS  Coaches can get the non-assertive players involved, by throwing or rolling the ball towards them  If the players are really shy, simply place the ball at their feet

89 IMPLEMENTING ‘NEW BALL’ METHOD GAME MANAGEMENT  If one team is dominating the game, the advantage can be shifted to the other team by throwing the ball accordingly.  This method can also be used to break up a ‘hive’, if all the players are bunched up around the ball for too long.

90 IMPLEMENTING ‘NEW BALL’ METHOD LOOSE BOUNDARY COMPONENT  Field boundaries are not adhered to very strictly  Ball is still in play even if it goes outside the sidelines and end lines  Only when play goes away from the field that a new ball is introduced  Coaches will need to use their judgment  The purpose of this component is to produce almost non-stop action with actual playing time close to 100% of game time

91 IMPLEMENTING ‘NEW BALL’ METHOD- LOOSE BOUNDARY COMPONENT WHY NO THROW-INS?  The hands-to-body coordination required for a throw in not developed at these ages  By 8-9 years old that hands-to-body coordination has developed and players are able to master a throw in with little instruction needed  Because they lack the necessary coordination, throw ins take a tremendous amount of time away from actual game play

92 U4 & U6 SEASON INFORMATION AND ORGANIZATION

93 2014 SEASON INFORMATION  SEASON DATES: MAY 5 TH - JULY 23 RD  No games or training on Memorial Day, July 2 nd and July 3 rd  Kick-Off Week  Boys: May 5 th & May 7th  Girls: May 6 th & May 8th  DAYS OF PLAY  Boys: Monday and Wednesday  Girls: Tuesday and Thursday  START TIMES  5:30, 6:45 or 7:00  These times are randomly assigned by our scheduling system but may be altered (ie all 6:45 starts) to accommodate the coach's scheduling needs.

94 U4 SEASON FORMAT  2 sessions per week  May 5-15 training sessions  May 19 - July 22 all sessions will be  ½ hr training- 5 min break- ½ hour game  Teams will train in “pairs” of teams  Teams within the pairs should be mixed together for training  Training plans will be provided  All teams will do the same training session

95 U6 SEASON FORMAT  2 sessions per week  May 5-27 training sessions (off Memorial Day)  May games  June- Mon & Tue’s- Training  June- Wed & Thu’s- Games  July –All games  Teams will train in “pairs” of teams  Teams within the pairs should be mixed together for training  Training plans will be provided  All teams will do the same training session

96 ROSTERS & SCHEDULES  TEAM ROSTERS  Will be ed to coaches no later than April 30 th  TEAM SCHEDULES  Will be ed to coaches no later than April 30 th

97 TRAINING SESSION MANAGEMENT

98 TRAINING DAY MANAGEMENT PREPARATION  Know your plan (and your back up plan)  Check the field for safety  Clear of debris  Goals are anchored  Nets are secure  First Aid kits available  Ensure equipment is available  Enlist the parents help if needed with the session  Enlist players help to set-up/pick-up  Keep them busy-down time is the enemy  NO LINES, NO LAPS, NO LECTURES

99 TRAINING DAY MANAGEMENT PARENT MANAGEMENT  Parents should  Sit on the opposite side of the field from the team  Sit behind the spectator lines or at least 5 ft off the touchline  Clean up field and surrounding area before and after game/training  Keep siblings and pets off the field  Not enter the field without coach/referee permission

100 TRAINING & GAME ATTIRE  PLAYERS  Team Shirt (once received)  Athletic shorts or pants- no buttons, snaps, zippers or pockets  Shin guards  Soccer socks completely covering the shin guard  Soccer cleats or tennis shoes- no baseball or football  No jewelry  COACHES  Team Shirt (once received)  Athletic shorts/ pants

101 U4 & U6 CURRICULUM TOPICS WEEKTECHNICALPHYSICAL WEEK 1 & 2DRIBBLINGCOORDINATION & BALANCE WEEK 3 & 4SHOOTING & RUNNING W/BALLSPEED & AGILITY WEEK 5 & 6BALL CONTROL & TURNINGBASIC MOTOR WEEK 7 & 8DRIBBLINGPERCEPTION & AWARENESS WEEK 9 & 10SHOOTING & RUNNING W/BALLCOORDINATION & BALANCE WEEK 11 & 121v1 ATTACKINGPERCEPTION, AWARENESS & BASIC MOTOR

102 TRAINING PLAN

103 WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN AN ACTIVITY AND A DRILL ? Drills  A to B to C  Boring  Not realistic  Lack competition  Static  Do not allow for differentiation  Often include standing in lines Activities  Reality (game) based  FUN  Competitive  Allow for decisions!!  Allow for creativity  100% participation  Age appropriate  Differentiation- Slanty Line theory

104 SEASON GOALS & OBJECTIVES  Player is comfortable when the ball is at their feet  Encourage the players desire to score!  FUN!  SKILL PRIORITIES  Running with the ball  Stopping the ball  Striking the ball  “Getting the ball”  Dribbling  Out of trouble / traffic  Past an opponent  Soft first touch

105 MODIFIED RULES AGE DIVISIONU4 BOYS & GIRLSU6 BOYS & GIRLS PLAYER AGE3 AND 45 AND 6 GAME DAY FORMAT½ AND ½10 MIN AND GAME GAME FORMAT3 v 3 GOALKEEPERNONE REFEREECOACH ROSTER SIZE (MIN/IDEAL/MAX)4 / 5 / 6 COACHES ON FIELDNO BALL SIZE33 DURATION OF QTRS6 MIN10 MIN TIME BTW QTRS/HALVES1 MIN/ 5 MIN SUBSTITUTIONSUNLIMITED-ON THE FLY FREE KICKSALL DIRECT- NO PENALTY KICK KICK OFF & AFTER GOAL SCOREDKICK OFF AT CENTER ALL OTHER RESTARTSBY COACH- PER KINS PROGRAM

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107 GAME DAY MANAGEMENT

108 PREPARATION  Plan a 5-8 minute warm-up activity (U6)  Pre-plan player rotations SAFETY  Check the field for safety  Clear of debris  Goals are anchored  Nets are secure  First Aid kits available  Ensure players are wearing required equipment  No jewelry (except medical)  Socks over shin-guards  Soccer cleats or safe athletic shoes

109 DURING THE GAME  Be a model of sportsmanship  Maintain a calm relaxed demeanor  Stay back from the touchline (ensure players are back too)  Limit coaching! This is the players game  It is their time to MAKE DECISIONS  There will be mistakes-sometimes over and over again  Mistakes are necessary to their learning process  Try not to react- physical or verbal  Limit substitutions  Allow players enough time to get into the flow of THEIR game  Ensure appropriate playing time

110 AFTER THE GAME  Shake hands with the other team  Thank the official(s)  No postmortem for players or parents  Let them go home and address any issues at the next training session  Make sure all players have been picked up  Wait with those who haven’t-Times Two Policy  Ensure field and sideline area are clean  Report any field or equipment issues to your Commissioner or Division Coaching Director  Ensure field and sideline area are clean

111 PARENT MANAGEMENT  Parents should  Sit on the opposite side of the field from the team  Sit behind the spectator lines or at least 5 ft off the touchline  Clean up field and surrounding area before and after game  Keep siblings and pets off the field  Not enter the field without coach/referee permission  CHEER! (NOT COACH)  For effort  For attempts  For everyone  FOCUS ON FUN  After a game…did you have FUN?  “I love to watch you play!”

112 CLUB WEBSITE OVERVIEW

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114 THANK YOU FOR YOUR COMMITMENT TO THE PLAYERS AND THE SPORT. OUR CLUB COULD NOT OPERATE WITHOUT THE GENEROUS HELP OF VOLUNTEERS LIKE YOU. SEE YOU ON THE PITCH!

115  0pJOIBk7cTrn3og 0pJOIBk7cTrn3og


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