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COACHING Wayne Hickman, Ed.D.; Christina Jordan, M.Ed.; & Rebecca Piermattei, M.S. School Climate Specialists Sheppard Pratt Health System.

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Presentation on theme: "COACHING Wayne Hickman, Ed.D.; Christina Jordan, M.Ed.; & Rebecca Piermattei, M.S. School Climate Specialists Sheppard Pratt Health System."— Presentation transcript:

1 COACHING Wayne Hickman, Ed.D.; Christina Jordan, M.Ed.; & Rebecca Piermattei, M.S. School Climate Specialists Sheppard Pratt Health System

2 My Job Today: To review various coaching styles 1.Influencer 2.Practical & Effective Coaching Effective Coaching Ineffective Coaching

3 Copers vs. Influencers “People tend to be better copers than influencers. In fact, we’re wonderful at inventing ways to cope.” – Patterson, Grenny, et. al.

4 Changing Minds People will attempt to change their behavior if: 1. they believe it will be worth it, and 2. they can do what is required.

5 VERBAL PERSUASION Most common tool to change others expectations When it comes to resistant problems, it rarely works The Great Persuader Personal experience Create a vicarious experiences Become a good story teller Tell the whole story Provide hope

6 VERBAL PERSUASION Most common tool to change others expectations When it comes to resistant problems, it rarely works The Great Persuader Personal experience Create a vicarious experiences Become a good story teller Tell the whole story Provide hope

7 SIX SOURCES OF INFLUENCE

8 PERSONAL MOTIVATION

9 Make the Undesirable Desirable How can you get people to do things they currently find loathsome, boring, insulting, or painful? The most basic source of motivation – intrinsic satisfaction.

10 PERSONAL MOTIVATION Create New Experiences – Get people to try it. – Make it a game. Create New Motive – Connect to a person’s sense of self (pride). – Engage in moral thinking (what is best for you). Don’t minimize or justify inappropriate behavior by transforming humans into statistics.

11 PERSONAL MOTIVATION Win Hearts by Honoring Choice – Surrender control, connect to the power of a committed heart. – Link into people’s view of who they want to be. – Allow individuals to discover on their own the links between their current behavior and what they really want.

12 PERSONAL MOTIVATION Key Strategy: Consciously connect to values Allow self-discovery Create personal experience Create vicarious experiences Tell a story End with an invitation

13 PERSONAL ABILITY

14 Surpass Your Limits We often underestimate the need to learn and actually practice the behavior. Perfect practice makes perfect. Deliberate practice requires complete attention. Give clear and frequent feedback against a known standard.

15 PERSONAL ABILITY Surpass Your Limits Break mastery into mini goals. – Set specific goals. – Goals to improve behaviors or processes rather than outcomes. – Provide short-term, specific, easy and low-stakes goals that specify the exact steps a person should take.

16 PERSONAL ABILITY Key Strategy: Demand deliberate practice Practice Break the skill into small parts Get feedback from a coach Prepare for setbacks

17 SOCIAL MOTIVATION

18 Harness Peer Pressure The Power Ensure that people feel praised. Emotionally supported. Encouraged by those around them. Discourage or socially sanction unhealthy behaviors.

19 SOCIAL MOTIVATION Harness Peer Pressure The Power of the Right One Spend lots of time with formal leaders to ensure they are using their social influence. Enlist Opinion Leaders Are early adopters of innovation. Open to new ideas. Socially connected and respected.

20 SOCIAL MOTIVATION Harness Peer Pressure Become an Opinion Leader Viewed as knowledgeable about the issues. Viewed as trustworthy and have other people’s best interest in mind. Generous with their time.

21 SOCIAL MOTIVATION Harness Peer Pressure The Power of Everyone – Public Discoveries Make the un-discussable discussable – code of silence sustains unhealthy behavior. Must have open dialogue about proposed changes before it can be safely embraced by everyone.

22 SOCIAL MOTIVATION Harness Peer Pressure Create a Village Create space where formal and informal leaders relentlessly encourage appropriate, positive behaviors and skillfully confront negative behaviors.

23 SOCIAL MOTIVATION Key Strategies: Pave the way Enlist the power of those who motivate Seek the support of those who enable

24 SOCIAL ABILITY

25 Find Strength in Numbers Enlist the Power of Social Capital The profound enabling power of an essential network of relationships. People at all intellectual levels – often perform better than one individual. When facing change, turbulent or novel times – multiple heads can be better than one.

26 SOCIAL ABILITY Key Strategies: Pave the way Enlist the power of those who motivate Seek the support of those who enable

27 STRUCTURAL MOTIVATION

28 STRUCTUAL MOTIVATION Design Rewards & Demand Accountability Extrinsic Rewards First 3 steps 1.Vital behaviors connect to intrinsic satisfaction. 2.Line up social support. 3.Rewards are the last resort.

29 STRUCTUAL MOTIVATION Design Rewards & Demand Accountability Use Incentives Wisely Ensure extrinsic rewards linked to vital behaviors are:  Immediate.  Gratifying.  Clearly correlated. Small heartfelt tokens of appreciation. Less is more.

30 STRUCTURAL MOTIVATION Design Rewards & Demand Accountability Reward small improvements in behavior along the way. Reward vital behaviors alone – not outcomes. If you reward the actual steps people follow, results take care of themselves.

31 STRUCTURAL MOTIVATION Key Strategies: Link rewards in moderation Link rewards to vital behaviors Use rewards that reward

32 STRUCTURAL ABILITY

33 Change the Environment Consider: The world of buildings, space, sound, sight. Turn laser like attention off people and take a closer look at their physical world. Frequency and quality of human interaction is largely a function of physical distance. Propinquity – is physical proximity.

34 STRUCTURAL ABILITY Change the Environment Savvy leaders rely on use of physical space as means of enhancing interaction – don’t just tell people to collaborate, they move employees next to one another. Making use of things to enable behavior works best when you can alter the physical world in a way that eliminates human choice.

35 STRUCTURAL ABILITY Change the Environment Mind the Data Stream Importance of an accurate data stream. Strategies focus on vital behaviors by serving up visible, timely, and accurate information that supports their goals.

36 STRUCTURAL ABILITY Key Strategies: Use the power of space Use the power of data and cues Use the power of tools

37 SIX SOURCES OF INFLUENCE “LOSING WEIGHT”

38 PRACTICAL & EFFECTIVE COACHING 1.Administration 2.Communication 3.Data 4.Evidence-Based Programs 5.Stakeholders 6.Implementation 7.Team & Team Meeting 8.Other qualities & considerations

39 ADMINISTRATION Support Not just buy-in Supporting team decisions (trust) Visible Involved

40 COMMUNICATION Open Clear expectations Clear limitations Any possible funding issues Frequent Always available even for quick text Honest Don’t personalize feedback and any frustration

41 COMMUNICATION Knowledgeable Implementation of PBIS Fidelity instruments Visible Support Liaison Between grant, district, administration

42 DATA Importance of data Assist in organizing/presenting data For team For staff To monitor progress of efforts Sources of data Office referrals  Attendance Out-of-school suspensions  Tardies Positive Referrals  Academics

43 EVIDENCE-BASED PROGRAMS Let school(s) work within their own timeline Okay to start small and work the kinks out Utilize data to make decisions Celebrate even the smallest successes Work with what’s already in place

44 STAKEHOLDERS Encourage that team is representative of school staff Know who has the power in the school and work through them Encourage school to gather student/staff feedback For sustainability, business/community support is imperative Expect changes in team composition over time – Assist in educating new team members about team, purpose, etc.

45 IMPLEMENTATION If at multiple schools, each school may be in a different place of implementation Let school(s) work within their own timeline Be aware that team members may have their own agenda and perspective about school needs

46 TEAM & TEAM MEETING Group dynamics Assist administration in devising an effective team Recruiting team members External coach? Get to know team members Individual personalities as well as how those personalities interact with and as the group See team as expert of school’s culture, needs, desires Broker – resource and information; build up team

47 TEAM & TEAM MEETING Willingness to help Communicated Honor culture of school Come in with open mind Present options Allow the school to move it forward at their pace

48 TEAM & TEAM MEETING Team roles Note taker Minutes (Documentation) Help set agenda standards Action Plan  Lessons Data for each goal  Budget/Incentives

49 OTHER QUALITIES & CONSIDERATIONS Motivated Approach job positively Demonstrate willingness to work with team Prioritize work Guide, facilitate NOT direct, dictate

50 OTHER QUALITIES & CONSIDERATIONS Support may look different from school-to- school Expect successes & challenges Pushback from schools is not personal Be flexible

51 OTHER QUALITIES & CONSIDERATIONS Realist How much can team can do at one time Nurturing Celebrate even the smallest of successes Confidence in team’s ability Step back, but not away If External Coach, remember … you are a GUEST in the school

52 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS MDS3 is funded by a grant from the USDOE. Federal Grant CFDA# Q184Y Sheppard Pratt Health System: – Susan Barrett, M.A. – Patti Hershfeldt, Ed.D Maryland State Department of Education Johns Hopkins University

53 REFERENCES Patterson, K., Grenny, J., Maxfield, D., McMillan, R., & Switzler, A. (2008). Influencer: The Power to Change Anything. New York: McGraw-Hill.

54 CONTACT Wayne Hickman, Ed.D. – Christina Jordan, M.Ed. – Rebecca Piermattei, M.S. –


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