Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

SUPERHEROS FOR SCIENCE! The Science Fair Workshop By Showboard, Inc. ®

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "SUPERHEROS FOR SCIENCE! The Science Fair Workshop By Showboard, Inc. ®"— Presentation transcript:

1 SUPERHEROS FOR SCIENCE! The Science Fair Workshop By Showboard, Inc. ®

2 REAL SCIENTISTS!!! BRYAN LEMUS – Miami, Fl JASMINE ROBERTS – Tampa, Fl JEFFREY LITTREL – Pittsburg, Pa

3 WHY HAVE A SCIENCE FAIR? STUDENT OPPORTUNITIES COMMUNITY EVENT STATE AND NATIONAL STANDARDS

4 Science projects and fairs provide opportunities for individual students to use scientific principles and techniques to investigate real world problems, not just read in a book about what someone else has done. Tell me – I forget Teach me – I remember Involve me – I understand WHY HAVE A SCIENCE FAIR?

5 Science projects and fairs give students the opportunity to study a subject of individual interest. Science experiments can be developed for topics as varied as water skiing, swimming, basketball, music, art, rocketry, psychology, robotics, and computers. Students come to realize that science is found in every niche of the universe.

6 Science projects and fairs give students the opportunity to: Develop an understanding of the scientific method. Develop an open and creative approach to problem solving. Develop writing skills. Develop library research skills. Develop public speaking skills. Develop responsibility, discipline, honesty and teamwork. Develop organization and time management skills. Develop poise and self-confidence by participating in the science fair judging process. Gain recognition for academic achievement. WHY HAVE A SCIENCE FAIR?

7 STATE STANDARDS AND SCIENCE FAIRSSTATE STANDARDS AND SCIENCE FAIRS Understanding What You Read Analyzing Primary Source Information Comparing and Contrasting Main Idea, Details and Patterns of Organization Gathering, Analyzing and Evaluating Information Synthesizing Information and Drawing Conclusions Recognizing Cause-and-Effect Relationships Narrative Writing Thanks to - Carie Callan Lopatka - Orange County Regional Science and Engineering Fair WHY HAVE A SCIENCE FAIR?

8

9 SCHOOL FAIR TEAM STUDENT SUCCESSFUL SCIENCE FAIR PARENTSCOMMUNITY SUPERHERO CHALLENGE “Never doubt that a small, dedicated group of people can change the world.” - Margaret Meade

10 STUDENTS –PROJECT IDEAS –SCIENTIFIC PROCESS SKILLS –PROJECT DISPLAY BOARDS –WORLDWIDE COMPETITIONS AND EXPOS SUPERHERO CHALLENGE

11 STUDENT IDEAS FOR PROJECTS INTEREST OF STUDENT INTERNET MAGAZINES IDEA SHEETS OLD PROJECTS LOCAL ENVIRONMENT CURRENT EVENTS

12 INTERNET HELPFUL WEBSITES FAIR RESOURCES Science Fair Resource Guide Finding Science Reagents The Ultimate Science Fair Resource IDEA GENERATION Science Fair Central

13 PROJECT IDEAS SCIENCE FAIRS Science Fair Homepage Internet Science and Technology Fair Another Science Fair Homepage PRESENTATION AND EVALUATION Science Fair Studio SCIENCE FAIR JUDGING SHEET OTHERS INTERNET

14 EVALUATIONEVALUATION CRITERIACRITERIA

15 SCIENCE FAIR EVALUATION CRITERIA A.Statements to be addressed under Creative Ability/Originality There was a question asked It was an original question and the answer was not known The approach to answering the question was creative The creativity of the study was within the creative ability of the student The student used the scientific method in experimentation rather than only observations B.Statements to be addressed under Scientific Thought The scope of the study was within the student’s ability The study was well thought out and showed initiative in thought and design The goals and objectives of the study were well defined The scientific literature was developed for this study A logical hypothesis was developed for this study The data collected relates to the hypothesis C.Statements to be addressed under Thoroughness The student collected all data available The student identified all controls The sample sizes and population sources were carefully chosen The variable of each experiment was clearly defined Replications and duplications were used The student anticipated the problems encountered The student related the work to that reported in the literature The data was collected in quantitative units Several experiments were done, not just one The study was completed or brought to a logical stopping place The data was thoroughly analyzed

16 D.Statements to be addressed under Skill The experiments protocols were handled with skill The experiments were designed with care and anticipation The data measurements were done precisely, the study was skillfully designed, and was not too complicated Technical problems were overcome and not merely avoided A detailed notebook and log were kept This study was the student’s alone and excessive help was not utilized E.Statements to be addressed under Clarity The student is able to explain The student clearly understands the research The student understands the meaning of the results obtained The student understands where this research can lead in the future The student understands how this study can be improved It is clear to the student whether the data supports or fails to support the hypothesis Is the display well organized so that the component parts of the presentation are logical? Is it neat and uncluttered or are there items that are not part of the science or relevant to the study performed? Does the display stand alone? Can you understand the study without the student present? Does the display communicate science or just an exercise in artistry? F.Statements to be addressed under Teamwork (only for Team Projects) The tasks and contributions of each team member are clearly outlined Each team member was fully involved in the project Each team member was familiar with all aspects of the project The final work reflects the coordinated efforts of all team members

17 SCIENTIFIC PROCESS SCIENTIFIC METHOD RELATION TO STANDARDS MAKE IT A FUN EXERCISE

18 THE SCIENTIFIC METHOD

19 STUDENT TIMELINE

20 Log Books Log books are very important. Log books can fill in missing information when IRB & SRC issues come up. Log books are critical to understanding the implementation of the scientific method.

21 STUDENTS learn protocol, procedure, laboratory safety, ethics, and much more. MENTORS are protected and more willing to work with pre-college students TEACHERS have greater authority to guide student research and are better able to ensure student safety. RULES AND REGULATIONS

22

23

24 CHECKLIST FOR ADULT SUPERVISOR/SAFETY ASSESSMENT FORM 1 must be signed and dated by the adult supervisor prior to the beginning of experimental research RESEARCH PLAN 1A, INCLUDING THE RESEARCH PLAN ATTACHMENT all aspects must be completed by the student including detail of the research plan, written in the present or future tense APPROVAL FORM 1B must be signed and dated prior to the beginning of experimental research by the student, parent, adult supervisor, and possibly the src chairperson ORIGINAL ABSTRACT must be written after research is completed REQUIRED ISEF FORMS

25 HUMAN SUBJECTS VERTEBRATE ANIMALS POTENTIALLY PATHOGENIC BIOLOGICAL AGENTS CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RISK ASSESSMENTS OTHER ISEF FORMS

26 PROJECT DISPLAY BOARD Display Board Sections Purpose Hypothesis Procedure –Materials –Variables –Data collection –Data analysis (graphs) Conclusion COMMUNICATION Clear, Concise, Complete, Catchy

27

28 FROM THE CLASSROOM TO THE WORLD LOCAL –REGIONAL FAIR NATIONAL –ISEF –DCYSC INTERNATIONAL –MILSET

29 SUPERHERO CHALLENGE PARENTS STUDENT SPONSORS/SUPERVISORS VOLUNTEERS

30 EDUCATING PARENTS ABOUT SCIENCE FAIR PRACTICE INTERVIEW SESSIONS IN SCHOOL RESEARCH TIME COMMITTEE INVOLVEMENT SETTING EXPECTATIONS ALL DECISIONS OF THE JUDGES ARE FINAL PARENT INVOLVEMENT

31 ENCOURAGING WORDS (FROM MOM AND DAD) 1.That topic sounds great! I have a friend at work who might give you some information. 2.I’ll take you to the library to get some more information. 3.I’m really impressed with your thoroughness. 4.I know we must have something in the garage that you could use for your equipment. 5.Let’s keep your science checklist here on the refrigerator so we’ll know where it is. 6.Do I need to sign your data notebook? You have written your observations very clearly. 7.Pretend I am in your class and let me hear your presentation. 8.Your backboard display is very neat and tells everything about your project. I especially like the neat format of your graphs and tables. 9.We can pick up some colored paper and markers while we are at the store so you can begin Laying out your display. 10.Good luck on your presentation. I know you’ll do a good job. 11.You are working hard on your experimentation! Remember to keep it out of your brother’s/sister’s reach! 12.I’ll be glad to drive you to school today with your display. I know it is awkward to carry with all of your books.

32 SUPERHERO CHALLENGE SCHOOL FAIR TEAM –WHERE TO START –RESOURCES –JUDGING –RULES AND REGULATIONS

33 SCHOOL FAIR TEAM WHERE TO START? GOALS CHECKLISTS ESTABLISH YOUR TEAM TIMELINE CONTACT/RESOURCE LIST

34 SCHOOL SCIENCE FAIR COMMITTEES

35 CHECKLIST

36 DIRECTORS CHECKLIST FOR A SUCCESSFUL FAIR 1.Coordinate the date for the Science Fair with principal and/or school activity director. Avoid the week before semester exams. Avoid the rush to get paperwork into the District Science Office or SRC. 2. Reserve a location (gym, library, cafeteria, public facility). Notify the night or community school principal. Establish a Science Fair Committee: Institution Review Board (IRB), Awards (order awards early), Judges, Publicity, Setup, Takedown, Registration, and Program. 4. Make sure that you have a current rulebook from the International Science & Engineering Fair. This can be ordered from Science Service, Inc.; 1719 N Street, NW; Washington DC Phone (202) or Fax (202) This may or may not apply in your situation. 5.Provide teachers with judging criteria. 6.Design a registration card for the second-level fair, include appropriate information, such as: student’s name, teacher’s name, category (botany, zoology, etc.), division (elementary, junior, middle, senior), and title. 7.Set up a database using the information in #6. Excel works best. 8.Design a rotation touring schedule for the student body to view the science projects. 9.Schedule student, parent, and teacher monitors to be on duty while the student body is viewing projects. 10.Secure more than an adequate number of judges (set up a database including names, mailing, fax, and addresses). 11.Conduct a meeting for judges (go over criteria, etc.). 12.Secure a specific time commitment from judges. If time and help are available, call just prior to the judging, send available abstracts that he/she will be judging. 13.Have clipboards, nametags, and pencils available for the judges the day of the fair. 14.Provide a room and refreshments for the judges (if possible). 15.Request teachers to review class projects before entering them into the school’s fair (if applicable; make sure they have the proper paper work completed). 16. Have teachers make certain that a registration form is completed for each entry from their room.

37 14. Provide a room and refreshments for the judges (if possible). 15. Request teachers to review class projects before entering them into the school’s fair (if applicable; make sure they have the proper paper work completed). 16. Have teachers make certain that a registration form is completed for each entry from their room. 17. Have the teachers initial, color code, and number code each project. 18. Collect registration cards from the students as they bring their projects in for the setup. Direct your registration committee member to type a list of projects by Titles (alphabetized) to go in your database. 19. Refuse to accept projects unless they have been reviewed by the teacher, and are properly labeled, numbered, name-coded, and certified. 20. Request custodial assistance for the setup and the removal of projects (involve students as much as possible). 21. Enlist the art teacher, club, and/or classes, computer science class to make posters and banners to advertise the Science Fair. 22. Enlist assistance for the tabulation of scores. 23. Encourage teachers to include practice for interview sessions in their plans for teaching students how to complete a Science Fair project (e.g., Anticipate questions from the judges, wear appropriate attire). 24. At a department meeting just prior to the fair, enlist their help in committing themselves to a specific amount of judging time, if needed. 25. SEND THANK YOU NOTES WHERE NEEDED. 26. Evaluate your school’s fair with the committee and/or their science department. Target areas needing improvement the following year. 27. Plan a special announcement for the winners (1st, 2nd, 3rd, and maybe honorable mention if time permits). Plan some type of special recognition for the specific winners that will advance to the next level of competition. 28. Have a meeting with the winning students and their teachers. Complete the official registration for the next level and return it before the deadline. 17.Have the teachers initial, color code, and number code each project. 18.Collect registration cards from the students as they bring their projects in for the setup. Direct your registration committee member to type a list of projects by Titles (alphabetized) to go in your database. 19.Refuse to accept projects unless they have been reviewed by the teacher, and are properly labeled, numbered, name-coded, and certified. 20. Request custodial assistance for the setup and the removal of projects (involve students as much as possible). 21.Enlist the art teacher, club, and/or classes, computer science class to make posters and banners to advertise the Science Fair. 22. Enlist assistance for the tabulation of scores. 23.Encourage teachers to include practice for interview sessions in their plans for teaching students how to complete a Science Fair project (e.g., Anticipate questions from the judges, wear appropriate attire). 24.At a department meeting just prior to the fair, enlist their help in committing themselves to a specific amount of judging time, if needed. 25. SEND THANK YOU NOTES WHERE NEEDED. 26.Evaluate your school’s fair with the committee and/or their science department. Target areas needing improvement the following year. 27.Plan a special announcement for the winners (1st, 2nd, 3rd, and maybe honorable mention if time permits). Plan some type of special recognition for the specific winners that will advance to the next level of competition. 28.Have a meeting with the winning students and their teachers. Complete the official registration for the next level and return it before the deadline. 29.Make arrangements for transportation and overnight reservations (if needed). Arrange for the supervision of students who are setting up their projects at the fair. 30.Get advance permission from your principal for temporary duty and, if necessary, for a substitute, both for the day before the fair and the first day of the fair. 31. Some good information may be found on the internet...Check with other Science Fair directors for addresses.

38 SAMPLE REGISTRATION FORM

39 SCIENCE FAIR SITE Finding a location Advertising the Fair Volunteers for set up Volunteers for break down

40 THE BIG EVENT! DISCIPLINES – SAMPLE SET-UP FORMAL OR INFORMAL SET-UP SET-UP TIMES KEEP THINGS MOVING

41 JUDGING FIND JUDGES COMMUNICATION WITH JUDGES –JUDGING TIMES –FEEDBACK FORMS EDUCATE JUDGES EVALUATION CRITERIA WORKSHEET OPTIONS CARE AND FEEDING

42 SAMPLE QUESTIONS FOR JUDGES What is the purspose of your project. Describe the problem. Explain your procedure. Where did you get the idea for your project? What is your control? Variable? What instruments did you use for measurement? Did you repeat your test? How many times? On what data did you base your conclusion? What problems arose during your investigation? How did you overcome them? Are there any other approaches you might have taken to your research? What is the value of your project? Do your results indicate further investigation of this idea is needed? What would you do differently if you could do this project again?

43 COMMUNITY JUDGES FUND RAISING RESOURCE DATABASE SUPERHERO CHALLENGE

44 RESOURCES LOCAL AND STATE PARENTS ROTARY CLUBS STATE FAIR BUSINESSES COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES NATIONAL SCIENCE SERVICE INTEL EDUCATION DISCOVERY INTERNATIONAL MILSET UNESCO

45 EXXON MOBIL - $500.OO WAL-MART www. walmartfoundation.org Click on ‘Education’ OFFICE DEPOT BEST BUY https://bestbuyteach.scholarshipamerica.org/ LOCAL BUSINESSES, MILITARY, NON-PROFITS, SERVICE CLUBS (Elks, Lions, Rotary, Kiwanis, Masons, Sierra...) FRIENDS, PARENTS ASK! FRIENDS OF SCIENCE FAIR PHOTOS / T-SHIRTS SPONSORSHIPS

46 TO MOVE FORWARD… GET EXCITED MEET THE CHALLENGE –TEAM MEMBERS, STUDENTS, PARENTS AND THE COMMUNITY SUSTAIN THE EFFORT!

47 SUSTAINABILITY WIN CARDS –FILL OUT –E- MAIL SPECIALS –WEB SITE –www.showboard.com WRITE US

48 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT USE OUR FREE WORKSHOPS USE OUR AUTHORS – AGNES PFLUMM (Science and Literacy) – TARGETING STUDENTS SCIENCE MISCONCEPTIONS (Science Practice Skills) – MAGIC AND SHOWMANSHIP (Scientific Applications) – SOLAR POWERED RACING CARS (Science Practice Skills)

49

50


Download ppt "SUPERHEROS FOR SCIENCE! The Science Fair Workshop By Showboard, Inc. ®"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google